Monstrous Natures in Frankenstein and Term Paper

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Though the Monster tries to refrain from interfering; "What chiefly struck me was the gentle manners of these people, and I longed to join them, but dared not…[remembering] too well the treatment I had suffered the night before from the barbarous villagers" (142). The Monster learns how society behaves through the observation of the family, and through the reading of books. Much like Frankenstein, the Monster is greatly influenced by what he reads including Plutarch's Lives, Sorrow of Werter, and Paradise Lost. The Monster's innocence and ignorance, at this point, does not allow him to fully understand or relate to any of the characters in the books (166). The Monster eventually relates to Adam in Paradise Lost, not considering himself a monster, because even "Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him" (169). As Adam was created in God's own image, the Monster is a "filthy type of [Frankenstein's image], more horrid from the very resemblance" (169). The Monster is the embodiment of Frankenstein's monstrous, creative, and destructive nature. The Monster resolves to make Frankenstein as miserable as he, following him to the ends of the Earth, and being there at the time of his death.

Dracula, on the other hand, the Count, much like both monsters in Frankenstein, has become ostracized from society, in part to the passage of time, and because of his vampirism. In addition to superstition, much of the "monstrous nature" of the Count is derived from Victorian fears of sexuality and sexual freedom. In the story, the Count is repeatedly penetrating and exchanging bodily fluids with others, including men. The Count also "seduces" Lucy Westenra, taking advantage of her and turning her into a vampire in the process. Death and the disease of vampirism follow the Count wherever he goes. It is unclear what drives the Count to action, though he vows revenge for an unnamed offence (271). The Count claims to long for the days
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in which brave races "fought as the lion fights and how "the warlike days are over. Blood is too precious a thing these days of dishonourable peace, and the glories of the great races are as a tale that is told" (30). Because of his vampirism, he must consume blood in order to survive, and subsequently seeks to pass on his condition to a suitable companion, and possibly relive his past. "The blood is the life," at first dismissed as the maniacal ranting of Renfield proves to be the secret to the Count's longevity (Stoker 133). The Count, first feeds upon Renfield, driving him to madness, and subsequently feeds upon Jonathan Harker, whom imprisons within his castle (29). Furthermore, Jonathan is subjected to the Count's three vampiric brides (39). It important to note the role of blood in the story; blood is the source of life, as well as, death. Almost everyone that has been fed upon by the Count is doomed to death. The Count targets Mina, and attempts to destroy all that is good in her life. The Count almost succeeds, boasting that "their best beloved one," Mina, is now "flesh of my flesh; blood of my blood; kin of my kin…and shall later be my companion and my helper" (255). The Count not only seeks to destroy that which everyone holds near, the most innocent and upright of women, but seeks to eternally have her in his power.

Shelley and Stoker comment on Victorian conventions, exploiting the fears of scientific and industrial advancements, sexual revolution, and religious attitudes. They created monsters that were victims of society and social conventions. The monsters in these stories were victims of social ostracization. They were driven by their thirst for acceptance and companionship. Though they questioned Victorian conventions, they were unsuccessful in achieving their missions and ultimately fell victim to the convention that they were trying to defy.

Works Cited:

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. Retrieved

from http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/84.

Stoker, Bram. The Annotated Dracula. Ed. Leonard…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited:

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. Retrieved

from http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/84.

Stoker, Bram. The Annotated Dracula. Ed. Leonard Wolf and Satty. Ballantine Books, New

York: 1975. Print.

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