Mormon Fundamentalism The Rise And Term Paper

Length: 3 pages Sources: 12 Subject: Mythology - Religion Type: Term Paper Paper: #39923965 Related Topics: 19th Century, Public Administration, Book Of Revelation
Excerpt from Term Paper :

Instead, it can be observed that the social environment changed, and the Mormons simply adapted to this social environment change in their society (Brehm & Eisenhauer, 2006:406).

Based on McConkie and Boss's (2006) analysis of Mormon culture at present, it was observed that Mormons still observed the basic theological principles that Mormons of the early years (i.e., fundamentalist years) have practiced. That is, they still subsisted to the belief that "[t]he doctrine that God continues to speak, by revelation, to Apostles and Prophets in this day...An underlying doctrinal theme that men and women are agents of Deity..." (110). This passage illustrated that among Mormons, there is consensus that there is a need 'to change constantly,' because it is only through change that the church of Mormons can grow, which is the ultimate (even central) goal of the religious institution.

Thus, change is already an inherent feature in Mormon culture, even before it assumed a fundamentalist stance. Malan (2006) seconded McConkie and Boss's assertion, by adding that...

...

This finding about Mormon culture proves once again that change is an active feature of the religion, and because change is inherent, the religion then becomes susceptible to social environmental changes occurring in the society at a given period or at a specific point in time. Quinn asserted further that as leadership changes in LDS, the religious culture also becomes susceptible to change. In effect, there are external (socio-cultural changes) and internal (leadership changes) changes that make LDS an ever-changing organization/institution. That is why its fundamentalist nature from the 19th to early 20th centuries was a result of the social influence occurring in Western societies, wherein fundamentalism was influential and popular at the time. Its popularity in the LDS, then, lasted only until the time that it gradually decreased influence over Western societies as well.

Bibliography

Brehm, J. And B. Eisenhauer. (2006). "Environmental concern in the Mormon culture region." Society and Natural Resources, Vol.19.

Malan, M. (2006). "Understanding methods of change in Mormon cultural attitudes beyond "official" doctrinal views and popular public image -- a reply to Christensen." Sexuality & Culture, Vol. 10, No. 3.

McConkie, M. And R. Boss. (2006). "OD values and Mormonism: creating adaptive systems." Public Administration Quarterly.

Newell, Q. Review of "Excavating Mormon pasts: the new historiography of the last half century." American Society of Church History.

Quinn, D. Review of "An introduction to…

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

Brehm, J. And B. Eisenhauer. (2006). "Environmental concern in the Mormon culture region." Society and Natural Resources, Vol.19.

Malan, M. (2006). "Understanding methods of change in Mormon cultural attitudes beyond "official" doctrinal views and popular public image -- a reply to Christensen." Sexuality & Culture, Vol. 10, No. 3.

McConkie, M. And R. Boss. (2006). "OD values and Mormonism: creating adaptive systems." Public Administration Quarterly.

Newell, Q. Review of "Excavating Mormon pasts: the new historiography of the last half century." American Society of Church History.


Cite this Document:

"Mormon Fundamentalism The Rise And" (2007, May 30) Retrieved April 16, 2021, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/mormon-fundamentalism-the-rise-and-37466

"Mormon Fundamentalism The Rise And" 30 May 2007. Web.16 April. 2021. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/mormon-fundamentalism-the-rise-and-37466>

"Mormon Fundamentalism The Rise And", 30 May 2007, Accessed.16 April. 2021,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/mormon-fundamentalism-the-rise-and-37466

Related Documents
Religious Fundamentalist Sub-Tradition Fundamentalist the
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Topic: Mythology - Religion Paper #: 12167405

For fundamentalists, law and authority come from God. This is true not only in formally theocratic societies, like Iran, but can also be seen expressed in the views of fundamentalist U.S. Christians, who have an obsession with having the Ten Commandments displayed outside of secular buildings, advocate school prayer and the need for laws to be justified by Judeo-Christian values. Female sexuality must be contained; boundaries must be established between men and

Religion Shaped AMERICAN& 8230; How Religion
Words: 2067 Length: 8 Pages Topic: Mythology - Religion Paper #: 68756801

Revisionist historian often seek to find non-Christian association among the lives of the founding fathers, such as the Freemasons, and Humanism, yet it is clear that these organizations were not dominant to religion and that a strong Protestant ethic still reigned supreme, especially in the language of the foundational documents of the nation. Fundamentalism Fundamentalism has in fact created a more recent expression in modern America as churches attempt to "go

Laramie Project: Small Town Violence
Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Topic: Women's Issues - Sexuality Paper #: 28033814

Just like they deny the existence of the gay scene near the small town, the idea that their attitudes could have played any contributing role in fostering the circumstances that gave rise to Matthew's murder is inconceivable. The character of Laramie as a community is conveyed by the evocative language used by the characters. Their words simultaneously paint a collective physical and emotional picture of the landscape and reveal