Pornography There Are a Number Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Some sociologists and feminist scholars see pornography as an industry that objectifies women -- the large majority of heterosexual porn focuses on the needs of the man, and women are really little more than sexual objects. The industry itself is set up someone like prostitution, according to this view. People are paid to have sex on camera for the viewing pleasures of others. Indeed, pornography sets up an unrealistic expectation of humans -- the actors all tend to be of a certain type, any imperfections airbrushed out, very little talking, and people who are desirous of sexual activity 100% of the time (Paul, 2005).

Healthcare professionals must understand, as well, that there is a huge continuum of sexual desire, fantasy and behavior within the human species. There is a difference between the use of pornography and sexual addiction; and using pornography to replace intimate relationships. From the perspective of a professional, it is important to ensure that children are not being unwittingly exposed to pornography, or used in any demeaning manner. Further, because there is such a large continuum of sexual behavior, it is impossible to draw cogent conclusions that there is a strict causal relationship between the consumption of pornography and certain negative, or societally deviant, behaviors. The pornography business is a multi-billion dollar consumer market. If there were no market, one can be sure there would be little produced. Medical professionals should realize that since 1990 there has been a paradigm shift as gender theorists re-examine pornography and erotica. Some look at advertising and cable movies and find that there is a "pornification" of society while others see a reduction in censorship and prudish attitudes as positives. The essence is that, like guns, knives, or other materials, it is not the actual product that has the potential for damage; it is the intent of human interaction (Campbell, 2012).

References

What is Erotic and What is Pornographic? (March 29, 2004). H2g2. Retrieved from: http://www.h2g2.com/approved_entry/A2163070

Bridges, a., et al. (2003). Romantic partner's use of pornography: Its significance for women. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy. 29 (1): 1-14.

Campbell, M. (2012). Perspectives on Pornography and Erotica: Nudes, Prudes and Attitudes. Concordia University Spectrum Research Repository. Unpublished Master's Thesis retrieved from: http://spectrum.library.concordia.ca/974071/

Diamond, M., (1999). The Effects of Pornography: An International Perspective. University of Hawaii Pacific Center for Sex and Society. Retrieved from: http://www.hawaii.edu / PCSS/biblio/articles/1961to1999/1999-effects-of-pornography.html

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Huston, W. (2005). Under Color of Law: Obscenity vs. The First Amendment. Retrieved from: http://web.archive.org/web/20060928002640/http://www.nexusjournal.org / 2005obscenity/75-82.pdf

Kingstron, D., et al. (2008). Pornography use and sexual aggression: The Impact of frequency and type of pornography use on recidivism among sexual offenders. Aggressive Behaviors. 34 (1): 341-51.

Manning, J. (2006). The impact of internet pornography on marriage and the family: A review of the research. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity. 13 (1): 131-35.

Paul, P. (2005). Pornified: How Pornography is Transforming our Lives. New York: Owl Books.

Short, M., et al. (2012). A Review of Internet Pornography Use Research: Methodology and Content from the Past 10 Years. Cyber Psychology, Behavior and Social Networking. 15 (1): 13-22. Retrieved from: http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/70333276/review-internet-pornography-use-research-methodology-content-from-past-10-years

Zillman, D. (1986). Report of the Surgeon General's Workshop on Pornography and Public Health. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from: http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/NN/B/C/K/V/

Sources Used in Document:

References

What is Erotic and What is Pornographic? (March 29, 2004). H2g2. Retrieved from: http://www.h2g2.com/approved_entry/A2163070

Bridges, a., et al. (2003). Romantic partner's use of pornography: Its significance for women. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy. 29 (1): 1-14.

Campbell, M. (2012). Perspectives on Pornography and Erotica: Nudes, Prudes and Attitudes. Concordia University Spectrum Research Repository. Unpublished Master's Thesis retrieved from: http://spectrum.library.concordia.ca/974071/

Diamond, M., (1999). The Effects of Pornography: An International Perspective. University of Hawaii Pacific Center for Sex and Society. Retrieved from: http://www.hawaii.edu / PCSS/biblio/articles/1961to1999/1999-effects-of-pornography.html

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