Rabies Surveillance a Central Surveillance Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :



The book Rabies, edited by Alan C. Jackson and William H. Wunner is critically reviewed in a peer publication. Rabies is a "comprehensive" discussion about a major global disease, focusing on the history of the disease from ancient times, diagnostic evaluation of animal and human cases, immunological responses to the virus, and public health management recommendations. The reviewer recommends the book for its multidisciplinarity.

8. Scatterday, James E.; Schneider, Nathan J.; Jennings, William L.; Lewis, Arthur L. Sporadic animal rabies in Florida. Public Health Reports 1960;75(10): 945-955.

In 1960, the Florida State Board of Health examined 519 rabid animals, mostly dogs, from 1951-1958. "With the gradual reduction of this disease in dogs and the evolution of an increasingly effective animal bite reporting procedure, the sporadic cases in wildlife have now assumed major importance in Florida." The Board searched for an "inapparent reservoir" of vectors that led to sporadic infections.

9. Tibayrenc, Michel, Ed. Encyclopedia of infectious diseases. John Wiley & Sons 2007.

This is a comprehensive review of infectious diseases in general, focusing on the mechanisms of infection physiology rather than on individual diseases. Rabies is discussed in brief.

10. World Health Organization. Rabies vaccines: WHO position paper. Weekly epidemiological record/Releve epidemiologique hebdomadaire 2010; 32: 308-320.

Written in the dual-language diplomacy of the UN, this is the World Health Organization position on vaccinating for rabies in an international context. Annually, rabies kills 20,000 people in India, and 24,000 in Africa. Forty percent of fatalities occur to children aged 4-15, with a higher proportion…

Sources Used in Document:

10. World Health Organization. Rabies vaccines: WHO position paper. Weekly epidemiological record/Releve epidemiologique hebdomadaire 2010; 32: 308-320.

Written in the dual-language diplomacy of the UN, this is the World Health Organization position on vaccinating for rabies in an international context. Annually, rabies kills 20,000 people in India, and 24,000 in Africa. Forty percent of fatalities occur to children aged 4-15, with a higher proportion of females going without vaccination. Meanwhile, industrialized nations and parts of Latin America are wiping out rabies. Eleven species of virus have been discovered as of 2009. The WHO recommends the replacement of nerve-tissue vaccines as soon as possible. The inexpensive intradermal alternative should be used only when the financial or practical necessity is proven. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is recommended to high-risk people. Post-exposure prophylaxis is necessary depending on the level of indications.

11. World Health Organization. WHO Expert Consultation on Rabies 2005.

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