Robert Courtney Case Robert Courtney Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

3). How exactly did he get caught? After learning that it was possible that Courtney was diluting medications, the FBI and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) arranged a sting. In the sting, one of Courtney's customers (Hunter) ordered six prescriptions from Research Medical Tower Pharmacy (Courtney's company); the results of the tests on those drugs showed that "each had been diluted to between 17 and 39% of the required dosage" (Draper, p. 3).

The customer named Hunter than ordered two more prescriptions of Gemzar and one of Taxol. Soon the results from the FDA tests showed the "concentration levels had been reduced to 28%, 24% and virtually zero," Draper explains. A few days later the FBI "swarmed the pharmacy"; in the federal officers' car outside his building Courtney was asked how the doses of cancer drugs could have been so drastically diluted. "I don't understand," he replied. The Times' writer asks rhetorically, how could a "devout Christian and family man" who had built up about $20 million of earnings "…continue to steal from cancer patients as if his own life depended on it"? That is a question for the ages. Perhaps Courtney himself doesn't know the answer. Meanwhile, Courtney is incarcerated but he "fastidiously writes prayer cards in his prison cell as he once diluted medications in his compounding room," Draper explains (p. 3).

Conclusion

Were Courtney's church-related activities designed to direct attention away from his criminal activities? Did he have some kind of a personality shift that caused him to cheat his healthcare customers, selling them watered-down drugs? These questions and other will be asked for quite awhile about Courtney. But meantime the facts, grim as they are, tell the story of a man posing as a Christian who had the audacity and arrogance to amass millions of dollars by selling phony drugs to cancer patients who truly needed the real drugs.

Works Cited

Draper, Robert. (2003). The Toxic Pharmacist. The New York Times. Retrieved July 23, 2011,

From…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Draper, Robert. (2003). The Toxic Pharmacist. The New York Times. Retrieved July 23, 2011,

From http://www.nytimes.com.

Freed, Josh. (2009). Thousands of Diluted Drug Doses. CBS News. Retrieved July 24, 2011,

From http://www.cbsnews.com.

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