Sensory Loss in the Aged Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

If an underlying condition is the cause of the loss, then the logical procedure would be to treat the underlying cause. In some cases the sense of smell may return and for others the loss will be permanent.

Research supports the existence of changes in smell due to age. The causes of this loss are varied. There has not been considerable research into searching for a treatment as with other sensory declines. Loss of out sense of smell is not considered to be of greater consequence in our society. With the rare exception of those whose careers depend on it, there is little societal impact caused by a loss of sense of smell. For the person, they may not enjoy all of the things that they used to, but it does not carry any significant impairment with it.

There has been no formal effort dedicated towards research to restore the sense of smell, exclusive of any underlying conditions. The loss of a sense of smell is considered to go along with certain diseases or physical abilities. The underlying condition for the loss is treated and the sense of smell may come back. However, a loss of sense of smell is not treated as a condition in itself, but is treated alongside another condition. A loss of sense of smell may mean placing the person in danger and may place them at greater risks for certain hazards, but in general, this is not considered to be something that cannot be overcome with assistive devices.

Works Cited

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Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Arabi, A. (2004) Cochlear Implants: My Perspective. Term Paper. NBB421 - Effects of Aging on Sensory and Perceptual Systems. Professor Halpern. Friday, December 3, 2004. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Bauman, N. (2004) Hair Cell Regeneration -- Overcoming the Challenges. Center For Hearing Loss Help. November 2004. http://www.hearinglosshelp.com/articles/haircellchallenge.htm. Accessed December 15, 2006.

Cain, W., Stevens, J. (1989) Uniformity of olfactory loss in aging. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 561, 29-38.

Cochlear Implants. The Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center at the Cochlear.org (2006a) Total Costs for the Procedure. http://www.cochlear.org/sys-tmpl/cochlearimplantcosts/. Accessed December 15, 2006.

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