Teens and Tobacco the Journal Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

The different practices studied varied a lot in how often and how intensely they participated in anti-tobacco activities with patients.

The conclusions drawn by the authors of this article were that there are not enough tobacco control activities taking place among physicians. Those that are addressing tobacco with patients need to increase the intensity and frequency with which they do so. Those that are not addressing tobacco with patients need to begin to do so. Each practice should be individually evaluated to determine what changes need to be made to the tobacco use prevention policies and how to implement these changes most effectively. Physicians need to abandon the one-size-fits-all approach and actually individualize intervention methods for each patient and each specific situation. Simply handing out promotional literature on smoking will not be effective enough and a more complete approach must be planned.

While the conclusions drawn by the authors of this article are based on information gathered from physician practices in Nebraska, they are valid for a wide number of situations. People everywhere that work in situations where they have the opportunity to become involved in tobacco prevention should do so. Smoking is quite possibly the largest preventable cause of premature death and disability in America, and it is therefore an important cause. It is not only recommended that people working with children and teenagers implement anti-tobacco intervention methods into their work with them, but it is actually their duty to these children to help guide them onto a healthy, long-lived life path. Tobacco intervention needs to happen often, and it needs to be intensely implemented and consistent. Within the school system, it is important for all people -- teachers, staff, administrators, nurses, parents, and others -- work together to provide a continual and overarching program of anti-tobacco efforts. Students need to be taught not only that tobacco is bad, but actually be given the resources to come to this conclusion themselves. Detailed educational material must be presented in more than one format, including literature, multimedia presentations, lectures, interactive discussions, and other activities. It must be recognized that each youth will respond to different methods with varying levels of interest and understanding, and different methods of intervention will not have the same amount of effectiveness with different people. Tobacco prevention plans should be continually evaluated and updated based on the responsiveness of the youth involved, and it is vital to avoid using a one-size-fits-all program that does not take into account the individuality of those involved.

Bibliography

Backer, E.L., Crabtree, B.F., Gilbert, C., Havranek, R., & McIlvain, H.E. (1997).

Current trends in tobacco prevention and cessation in Nebraska physicians' office. Journal of Family Practice, 44,193-202. Archived article accessed online October 2, 2004 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0689/is_n2_v44/ai_19181952.

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Backer, E.L., Crabtree, B.F., Gilbert, C., Havranek, R., & McIlvain, H.E. (1997).

Current trends in tobacco prevention and cessation in Nebraska physicians' office. Journal of Family Practice, 44,193-202. Archived article accessed online October 2, 2004 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0689/is_n2_v44/ai_19181952.

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