Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Mexican Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

This test, embodied in Article 10 of the treaty, said that land grants would be considered valid to the extent that they were valid under Mexican law" (Ebright 29). According to Montoya (2002), although the treaty was ratified, the subsequent years were clouded by legal battles over quiet title to the lands involved because of the absence of Article X: "The process of defining property rights and ushering in market capitalism that had begun by issuing such a large land grant would continue under the U.S. legal and economic system. But for the next fifty years, charges of patronage, absentee landlordism, and unjust claims would cloud title to the land" (36).

Conclusion

The research showed that the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo concluded the U.S.-Mexican War and gained the United States Upper California, Texas and New Mexico in exchange for a paltry $15,000,000 and some nebulous assurances that the U.S. would cease hostilities and trade fairly in the future. The research also showed that contemporary Mexicans - as well as their modern counterparts - likely viewed the treaty as being highly one-sided and rather than being a carrot the treaty was more like extortion at the barrel of a gun. Nevertheless, the deed was done and the United States continued its westward expansion and its rendezvous with its self-proclaimed Manifest Destiny by virtue of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hildalgo.

Works Cited

Black's Law Dictionary (6th Ed.). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co., 1990.

Ebright, Malcolm. Land Grants and Lawsuits in Northern New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1994.

Montoya, Maria E. Translating Property: The Maxwell Land Grant and the Conflict over Land in the American West, 1840-1900. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002.

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. (2007). Azteca Web Page. [Online]. Available: http://www.azteca.net/aztec/guadhida.html.

Buchanan to Trist, 25 October 1847: The Mexican commissioners were told on 22 January 1848 that further military occupation of Mexico would take place…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Black's Law Dictionary (6th Ed.). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Co., 1990.

Ebright, Malcolm. Land Grants and Lawsuits in Northern New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1994.

Montoya, Maria E. Translating Property: The Maxwell Land Grant and the Conflict over Land in the American West, 1840-1900. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002.

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. (2007). Azteca Web Page. [Online]. Available: http://www.azteca.net/aztec/guadhida.html.

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