TV and Violence Doctors Monroe Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

It said that most parents would support new limits to be established on content of television programs and shows. Approximately half of the surveyed parents and their peers expressed concern that their own children saw what they saw on TV. More Black and Hispanic parents expressed this concern than did white parents. More than three-fourths of them said that inappropriate television and media material worried them the most. Two-thirds of them said they closely watched TV shows their children watched. Those who said they could not do very much said that the exposure had gone too widespread to be controlled or that they were too busy. The Kaiser study also reported that one in four of the parents surveyed admitted that the media were the main negative influence on their children. The rest said it had positive influence and the rest said it had little impact. Four in the 10 surveyed who owned TV sets with V-chips, which could block certain TV shows. Almost half of these said they used the technology to control their children's TV viewing. The Kaiser survey involved 1,008 randomly selected parents of children with children aged 2 to 17, conducted October 2 to 27 by the Princeton Survey Research Associates International (Fram).

Art has its limits and its advantages as well as benefits. And television is not the strongest medium, which transmits violence (Link, 1994). The approach to the problem of violence on TV would be to refrain from treating adults like children but to begin recognizing that children had the same capability to learn for themselves what they need to become adults. Parents needed to teach their children that they should read and watch TV as they would read a book. Children should handle the meaning contained on TV as well as other media. The problems of human nature could not be tackled by blocking programs or blaming artists for these problems, which in the first place, occur right in the human heart. Prohibitions should not take the beauty and greatness of art away or prevent children from learning for themselves and applying their parents' teachings on the programs and shows they viewed on TV. If prohibitions or control of program material would take the place of authentic guidance and communication between parents and children, art enthusiasts might as well stop performing (Link). Children would likewise be deprived of the chance to imitate leaders, performers and other worthwhile examples of excellence, courage and other virtues whose works are brought to them through their TV screen.

Bibliography

Better Nutrition (2002). TV Bashed. 2 pages. PRIMEDIA Intertec: PRIMEDIA Company

Bower, B. (1985). Social Channels Tune in TV's Effects. 2 pages. Science News: Social Science Service, Inc.

Etzioni, a. (1993). Lock Up Your TV Set: Violence on Television. 4 pages. National Review: National Review, Inc.

Fram, a. (2007).Most Parents Concerned About Violence in Media. 2 pages. Oakland Tribune: ANG Newspapers

Fraracci, L (2002). Television: Teacher of Violence.…

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Better Nutrition (2002). TV Bashed. 2 pages. PRIMEDIA Intertec: PRIMEDIA Company

Bower, B. (1985). Social Channels Tune in TV's Effects. 2 pages. Science News: Social Science Service, Inc.

Etzioni, a. (1993). Lock Up Your TV Set: Violence on Television. 4 pages. National Review: National Review, Inc.

Fram, a. (2007).Most Parents Concerned About Violence in Media. 2 pages. Oakland Tribune: ANG Newspapers

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