Women in History Problem of Term Paper

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Author Goldman continues, "Rather than assuming that all women are incapable of performance by virtue of the average woman's lack of capability, specific requirements should serve as the selection criteria, not gender" (Goldman 271). Gender should not matter if it does not matter to the women who want to join.

The government could open up more combat jobs to women to help solve the problem, and women who were interested in combat positions should be encouraged to serve in the armed forces. Indeed, in their own study, the government found that with the right training, women's physical capabilities can increase. Another author notes, "An Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine report (January 26, 1996) shows that intensive training of motivated women can increase their physical abilities" (Jernigan 51). Thus, physical limitations are simply an excuse many people use to argue against women in the military. Even the military itself recognizes these characteristics can change with training.

How does the military solve the problem of sexual harassment and abuse in the military? First, the entire male-dominated network of the military needs to shift. While control and discipline should be prime concerns in the military, there should also be a code of respect and honor for fellow soldiers - male or female. Another writer notes that the military is shaped by domination and force, and these are used against women targets, even if they are fellow soldiers. She writes, "These values emphasize the use of force and domination to solve problems even sometimes at the expense of the people constituting the nation" (Toktas). Women should be welcomed into the ranks and appreciated for the skills they can offer, rather than for sexual roles and targets of abuse.

As for abuse, women who take an active combat role are aware of the risks that come with that role, just as men are. Men can be tortured and raped as well by enemy forces, and men in combat understand that. If women choose a combat role, they should be aware of the many facets of that role, including abuse by the enemy if they are captured. It is not a pleasant side of war, but war is never pleasant.

In conclusion, the problem of women in the military is not as problematic as one might think. Many women would like to take an active role in the armed services to serve and protect their country, but are prohibited by many regulations and societal pressures. Women who desire a military service career should not be denied. In a day when the armed services are all having difficulties finding qualified recruits, they need to open up other options. A draft for women is not necessary, but allowing women to choose combat or non-combat roles when they enter the armed services is the fair and right thing to do for women and the defense of the nation.

References

Goldman, Nancy Loring, ed. Female Soldiers -- Combatants or Noncombatants?: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982.

Jernigan, Pat. "Women at War: Gender Issues of Americans in Combat." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 19.1 (2001): 51.

Marley, David John. "Phyllis Schlafly's Battle against the ERA and Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 18.2 (2000):

Toktas, Sule. "Nationalism, Militarism and Gender Politics: Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 20.2 (2002): 29+.

Violence against Women in the Military." USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education) Aug. 2001:

Weinstein, Laurie, and Christie C. White, eds. Wives and Warriors: Women and the Military in the United States and Canada. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey,…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Goldman, Nancy Loring, ed. Female Soldiers -- Combatants or Noncombatants?: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982.

Jernigan, Pat. "Women at War: Gender Issues of Americans in Combat." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 19.1 (2001): 51.

Marley, David John. "Phyllis Schlafly's Battle against the ERA and Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 18.2 (2000):

Toktas, Sule. "Nationalism, Militarism and Gender Politics: Women in the Military." Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military 20.2 (2002): 29+.

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