Yellow Fever the Fever by Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Studies suggest certain mosquitoes may also transmit the virus (Mulla, 1999).

The host for the disease is humans, and the environment of the case study includes the regions of Norfolk and Portsmouth. The agent examined is yellow fever. Other possible hosts include mosquitoes known to bear infection, like the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Mulla, 1999).

Primary Secondary Tertiary Prevention

If living at the time, primary prevention would have included avoidance of natural spread of the disease. This may have been almost impossible however as ships frequently traveled to cities via ports. However, temporary quarantine of ships entering port from affected areas may have served as a primary prevention technique for preventing spread of the disease (Oberle, 2001). Secondary prevention methods would have included providing citizens with clean waters and immunizations (Oberle, 2001).

Vaccines have proven beneficial for preventing yellow fever transmission in humans. Unfortunately vaccines were not available at the time in question, but other preventive measures or treatments may have enabled higher survival rates.

Tertiary prevention for yellow fever would include regular surveillance to identify high risk candidates or areas and tracing of contact among individuals infected with yellow fever to prevent further contamination and monitoring of the disease (Oberle, 2001).

Conclusions and Summary

Yellow fever during the 1800s caused an epidemic in the streets of Norfolk and Portsmouth, which Wager accurately depicts in his work "The Fever." Yellow fever is characterized by viral illness that mimics the flu in many cases, and varies in severity. The epidemic resulted in loss of life of thousands of people in the affected communities. Preventive measures are now available to treat and prevent this epidemic, and may include vaccination, provisions for clean water in affected area and quarantine if necessary.

References

Mulla, Z.B. (1999 - Oct). "Yellow Fever." Florida Dept. Of State. 15, October 2005:

http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Disease_ctrl/epi/htopics/reports/yell_fev.pdf

Oberle, M. (2001). Oberle, M. "Bioterrorism: A changing world and what you can do." http://healthlinks.washington.edu/nwcphp/bt/27nov2001.ppt

Wagner, L. (2005 - Jul). "The Fever." The Virginian Pilot, Available:

http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story.cfm?story=88113&ran=42214

Watts, S. (2001). "Yellow fever immunities in West Africa and the Americas in the age of slavery and beyond: A reappraisal." Journal of Social History, 34(4): 955.

The Fever

Sources Used in Document:

References

Mulla, Z.B. (1999 - Oct). "Yellow Fever." Florida Dept. Of State. 15, October 2005:

http://www.doh.state.fl.us/Disease_ctrl/epi/htopics/reports/yell_fev.pdf

Oberle, M. (2001). Oberle, M. "Bioterrorism: A changing world and what you can do." http://healthlinks.washington.edu/nwcphp/bt/27nov2001.ppt

Wagner, L. (2005 - Jul). "The Fever." The Virginian Pilot, Available:

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