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Learning Philosophy the Ability to Learn Is
Words: 859 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30098002
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Learning Philosophy

The ability to learn is one of man's most important talents, and, in order for one to improve this capacity, the respective person needs to focus on enriching his personal experience through any means available. Similarly, the respective person has to acknowledge that learning should be something that one longs for, regardless of the fact that many individuals tend to end their education after they finish high school. Learning should not be considered as being something exclusively connected to education, as people can gain important information from a series of environments other than educational institutes. Teachers are mainly responsible for the way that learners amass information, thus meaning that they have to develop methods of having students learn individually and on account of their personal values. Moreover, students need to be influenced in seeing learning as something positive and as something that they should gladly take on. In…

Learning Motivation Learning and Motivation
Words: 3469 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89082575
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') (Tingstrom et al., 226) in correspondence with the example provided by the researchers responsible for this evaluation, it may be deduced that such method of positive reinforcement implementation is best suited to a younger educational context such as grammar school. It may only be considered appropriate to attach the positive consequences of individual efforts with the capabilities of an entire class in settings where future prospects such as class rank and college admissions have not yet entered into the discourse over performance motivators.

Tingstrom et al. also identify the independent group-oriented contingencies, which "involve consequences, and criteria for all group members, but access to reinforcement for each group member is based on each member's performance (e.g., 'whoever makes a 90% or higher on the end chapter math test will be able to pick a prize from the treasure chest.' (Tingstrom et al., 226) in many ways, this has proved…

Bibliography

Bunderson, C.V. (1990). Computers in Educational Assessment: An Opportunity to Restructure Educational Practice. Educational Resource and Information Center.

Eisner, E. (1997). The Promise and Perils of Alternative Forms of Data Representation. Educational Researcher, Vol. 26, No. 6, p. 4-10.

Emerson, J. (1989). Review: Dead PoetsSociety. Jeems Cinepad. Online at http://cinepad.com/reviews/deadpoets.htm.

Florio-Ruane, Suzanne; Marianne George & Taffy E. Rapheal. (2004). Book Club Plus: Organizing Your Literacy Curriculum to Bring Students to High Levels of Literacy. Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, Vol. 27.

Learning Knowledge Centered the Authors Use
Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56731108
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Another way of combining these two approaches is by having the students involved in the process of what is learned and how. Each learner brings something different to the classroom, so will want to take away something different as well. The teacher and student can work together to set goals of what is to be achieved. Similarly, the students need continual feedback, so they know how they are accomplishing these goals. Lastly, since all students do learn differently, the classroom environment has to be a place for sharing new ideas. Students can learn considerably by seeing how their peers perceive the same drawing, or science experiment or historical event. They gain both knowledge and acquire new learning about their own abilities and that of others in the room. More importantly, this gives each child a similar opportunity to express him or herself and build self-esteem, regardless of the students' varying…

Learning Culture and Memory
Words: 2090 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91902626
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Memory
A learning culture is an organizational practice, system and values that encourage and support individuals and organizations to increase performance levels, competence and knowledge. It promotes continuous support and improvement for an achievement of goals. Adjustment of current strategies can be done by adjusting to a trend, business model, capital model, launch strategy and making a great plan.
There are several ethical principles and professional standards of learning and cognition in the workplace. Some of them are; encouraging contact between faculty and student, developing cooperation between students, encouraging active learning and respecting adverse talents and learning techniques. Some implications that should be considered when working with others are; demonstrating respect at work, providing feedback with an impact, showing appreciation and overcoming fear of conflict.
WEEK 3 DISCUSSION
Memory Suppression in Alzheimer’s disease
Alzheimer’s diseases is chronic degenerative disease of the neurons. It causes about 60-70% of dementia cases. The…

Active Performance Management Proposal Case Study Evaluating
Words: 1989 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 49847331
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Active Performance Management Proposal: Case Study Evaluating Active Performance Measurement in Beechwood

The research examines the potential possibilities of active performance management in the modern workplace. It first examines the current literature as a way to set a foundation for the actual analytic portion of the project. Then, specific research questions are examined in order to provide a framework to test the actual efficiency of an active performance management style implemented in the field. Finally, a potential methodology is explored as well as the significance of the research as a whole.

In this vulnerable economic environment, many businesses are looking for an edge on their competition. One potentially lucrative strategy for increasing productivity and efficiency within implementation of future strategies is adopting an active performance measurement strategy. In this, managers focus on evaluating perfomance from a proactive standpoint. Essentially, "the purpose of performance analysis is to locate evidence and draw…

References

Abbey, Paul, 2009. Active performance management. Management Articles. Web.  http://www.articlesfactory.com/articles/management/active-performance-management.html 

Armstrong, Michael, 2009. Armstrong's Handbook of Performance Management: An Evidence-Based Guide to Delivering High Performance. Kogan Page Publishers.

Beechwood, 2012. About Beechwood. Beechwood. Web.  http://www.beechwoodps.co.uk/about 

Ferri, Richard A., 2010. Active managers' market-beating claims debunked. Forbes. Web.  http://www.forbes.com/2010/02/16/mutual-funds-active-management-debunked-personal-finance-indexer-ferri.html

Learning in Recent Years Is
Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69090854
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(3) According to the Multiple Intelligences Survey, I have quite a bit of intrapersonal and interpersonal intellegence and a moderate amount of musical and kinesthetic intelligence. This makes sense because I enjoy analyzing people and situations; and, I decided to leave my old job because I was bored sitting still behind a desk and not talking to anyone for most of the day.

As I was enjoying the surveys so much, also I took Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory and discovered that my learning style consists of doing and feeling or what Kolb would abbreviate as "CE/AE." When these findings are placed on the two-by-two grid by Kolb, my learning style is accommodating. An accommodating learning style is often times referred to as a "hands-on" style and one that relies upon intuition over logic. In fact, these findings also did not surprise me because I have to do something at least…

References

Codde, PhD, J.R. (2006). Using Learning Contracts in the College Classroom. Michigan State University.

Learning to Read and Write Are Complementary
Words: 1445 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22351665
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Learning to read and write are complementary skills. While in the younger years, writing depends on reading skills, by middle and high school, they are complementary skills: reading is necessary to do writing assignments, while writing about what has read increases comprehension of the reading materials. For this reason, separating reading and writing instruction from content areas is arbitrary and will eventually interfere with the students' progress in those content areas.

From the day children are born, parents are told by doctors, teachers and other experts to read to them, and to read to them every day. They are told to do this because hearing language that contains story lines, rich language and vivid imagery facilitates language development and develops a desire to read. From "The Poky Little Puppy" to Rudyard Kipling, children's literature exists that uses language in exciting and colorful ways. Good children's literature doesn't sound the same…

Bibliography

Erickson, Lawrence.Jan. 11, 1998. "Informational literacy in the middle grades." The Clearing House.

Foley, Regina M. Winter, 2001. "Academic Charateristics of incarcerated youth and correctional educational programs: a literature review." Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

Gardill, M. Cathleen, and Jitendra, Asha K.April 15, 1999. "Advanced Story Map Instruction: Effects on the Reading Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities." Journal of Special Education: Vol.33.

Nourie, Barbara; Livingston, Lenski, and Davis, Susan.July 17, 1998. "The (in)effectiveness of content area literacy instruction for secondary preservice teachers." The Clearing House: 71: 372-375.

Learning Methods Within a Learning Setting Each
Words: 1041 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4587189
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Learning Methods

Within a learning setting, each student comes with their individual package and it is not possible to have two pupils learning concepts in the same way despite the fact that they are taught with the same curriculum by the same educators as well. Naseem International School accommodates students from different cultures and backgrounds with different needs. The needs are not purely academic and learning needs only but also cultural and social needs hence care is needed. This paper looks at how teachers can plan for and assess the individual needs of students as well as identify and discuss strategies which promote and enhance the learning of students who have different educational needs (Project Ideal, 2008).

It is critical to asses the pupils in my class since they differ in terms of their abilities to learn and imbibe concepts in class. This assessment can be done as below:

Highest…

References

Douglous.D.Christensen, (1996). Teaching Strategies for Students with Diverse Learning Needs.

Centennial Mall South. Nebraska Department of Education. ( Pg 11-16).Retrieved January 24,2013 from  http://www.nebraskasocialstudies.org/pdf/tsfswdln.pdf 

Sue Watson, (2012). Differentiated Instruction and Assessment. Retrieved January 24, 2013

from  http://specialed.about.com/od/teacherstrategies/a/differentiated.htm

Learning Needs Assessment and Analysis the University
Words: 1825 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12900591
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Learning Needs Assessment and Analysis

The University of San Diego Counseling Center (USDCC) has been established to provide enrolled students with access to quality counseling and healthcare services. Employing a diverse selection of the university's most accomplished psychiatrists, psychologists, medical doctors, registered nurses, and other healthcare professionals, the USDCC operates a high-volume Critical Intensive Care Unit with the assistance of a 50-member nursing staff. Although the USDCC has built a reputation for delivering competent and qualified critical care services across a number of years, the organization's management structure has become concerned that educational priorities have not been updated to reflect modern advancements in the field. To that end, the USDCC recently elected to conduct a comprehensive Learning Needs Assessment and Analysis to identify the paramount educational needs in place, and the institutional forces working to facilitate or impede the implementation of these needs. Empirical research on the efficacy of various…

References

Lewin, K. (1939). Field theory and experiment in social psychology: Concepts and methods.

Journal of Sociology, 44, 868-896. Retrieved from  http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/2769418?uid=3739552&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=7 

0&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21101323864143

Morrison, G.R., Ross, S.M., Kalman, H.K., & Kemp, J.E. (2011). Designing effective instruction (6th ed). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Learning and Cognition Definition of Learning Merriam-Webster
Words: 1020 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81943194
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Learning and Cognition

Definition of Learning

Merriam-Webster defines learning as "knowledge or skill acquired by instruction or study; modification of a behavioral tendency by experience (as exposure to conditioning)" (Merriam-Webster, 2011). Other experts defines learning as a process, one that leads to behavioral change or potential behavior change that is relatively permanent. That is, as people learn, his or her learning alters the way one perceives the environment, the way he or she interprets incoming stimuli, and therefore, the way one interacts or behaves (Introduction to Learning Theory, 2004). According to Cherry (2011), learning is a permanent change in behavior that is the result of experience. The common characteristic that all these definitions share is their identification of a behavioral component as part of the process of learning. In other words, for learning to occur, a change in behavior takes place.

The ole of Behavior

For the early part of…

References

Bietz, K. (2011). The relationship between learning and cognition. Bright Hub. Retrieved June 26, 2011 from  http://www.brighthub.com/education/early-childhood/articles/101060.aspx 

Cherry, K. (2011). Learning Study Guide. About.com Psychology. Retrieved June 26, 2011 from  http://psychology.about.com/od/psychologystudyguides/a/learning_sg.htm 

Introduction to Learning Theory and Behavioral Psychology. (2004). Retrieved June 26, 2011 from  http://allpsych.com/psychology101/learning.html 

Merriam-Webster. (2011). Learning. Retrieved June 26, 2011 from  http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/learning?show=0&t=1309112968

Learning & Teaching LSJ Expecting
Words: 1125 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86797209
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.. than grown-ups understanding, caring and self-motivation of children [are] what should be] cultivated... It can be very damaging for a person's development to be treated as a child until the age of 21... children can make very valuable contributions to society with their fresh perspectives and playful attitudes. This is to be supported and treasured.

Instead, however, since childhood independence and autonomy often are not encouraged, today's young students often become inflexible, non-adaptive, and non-spontaneous, therefore operating based on confusion, fear, or "by rote" within new or unfamiliar environments. The example Rich gives of the elementary school-aged boy who was not expected to clear his own dishes from the table, at home or at school, and who is surprised about being asked to do so by the author (and initially reluctant to do so), is illustrative in that respect.

It is not surprising that in the school environment, as…

Works Cited

Children." Worldtrans.org. Retrieved October 1, 2005, from:  http://www.worldtrans.org/hw/children.html >.

Enjoying and Achieving." Early Years: Firm Foundations. Ofsted Better

Education and Care. Retrieved October 2, 2005, from: http://www.ofsted.

A gov.uk/publications/firmfoundations/chapter3.htm>.

Learning Styles and Learning Practices in General
Words: 315 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3539771
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Learning Styles and Learning Practices

In general, psychological theorists and educators acknowledge that learning occurs quite differently in different individuals. Some people learn best by observing, whereas others learn best by listening, and still others learn best by participating or experiencing something more tangible in connection with the subject matter (Akkoyunlu, & Soylu, 2008). There are numerous theories about how people learn, and one of the most commonly used is Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI), that categorizes learning according to the following broad distinctions: Concrete Experience or considering things substantially the way they are presented; Abstract Conceptualization or considering things as ideas and theories that represent or incorporate what is represented; Active Experimentation or forming conclusions based on what is represented and conducting experiments to confirm those conclusions; and eflective Observation or determining…

References

Akkoyunlu, B., & Soylu, M.Y. (2008). A Study of Student's Perceptions in a Blended

Learning Environment Based on Different Learning Styles. Educational Technology & Society, 11 (1), 183-193.

Chickering, A.W. & Gamson, Z.F. (1991). Applying the Seven Principles for Good

Practice in Undergraduate Education. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 47.

Learning Log Reflections Culture Can Refer to
Words: 1190 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19296382
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Learning Log: Reflections

Culture

Culture can refer to many different aspects of human life that affect personal and professional relationships. We usually think of culture in terms of nationality: the Japanese culture, for example, is said to emphasize personal relationships and interconnectedness more than individualistic American culture. Cultures are often classified as more 'high context' or more 'low context' in orientation. In 'high context' cultures, inside knowledge, the relative position of someone on a leadership hierarchy and an awareness of the 'double meaning' of certain gestures is more important, than in a low context culture in which 'what you say is what you mean,' such as in the U.S.

Learning about different cultural perspectives and worldviews has made me more mindful about contextualizing my own. I have also noticed that even within nations, culture may vary -- a company located in an urban environment, versus one located in a rural…

Bibliography

Kubler-Ross, Elisabeth & David Kessler. 2010. Denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Grief.com. Accessed at  http://grief.com/the-five-stages-of-grief  / [December 27, 2010]

McNamara, Carter. 1999. Basic context for organizational change. Management help.

Accessed at  http://managementhelp.org/mgmnt/orgchnge.htm#anchor493930  [December 27, 2010]

McNamara, Carter. 2000. Organizational culture. Management help. Accessed at  http://www.managementhelp.org/org_thry/culture/culture.htm [December 27, 2010]

Active Euthanasia With Parental Consent
Words: 1184 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 13795643
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e. The exceptions made for impairment and age would open a Pandora's Box of legal precedence. The Death with Dignity Act and any other forthcoming active euthanasia laws will likely continue to follow the same line of reasoning, i.e. that it is the unimpaired individual who must shoulder the full responsibility of the decisions he or she is making regarding the end of his or her life. That is in fact the point of the law, that a physician's responsibility as well as the responsibility of anyone who is active in the act of euthanasia is relinquished entirely to the will of the dying individual. In the case of a child this decision cannot be made by a proxy, nor can this decision be made for an individual who is mentally impaired, by his or her guardians or care takers. Though the parents in this case have fundamentally compelling arguments…

References

Gilmore, J. (2005, April 4). Court-Ordered Euthanasia: Euthanasia Advocates Claim It Is Not a Crime to Kill as Long as the Victims Cannot Speak for Themselves. The New American, 21, 27.

Kamisar, Y. (1998). Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Problems Presented by the Compelling, Heartwrenching Case. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 88(3), 1121-1146.

Constructivist Theories of Learning
Words: 1019 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73479750
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Learning

Constructivist and cognitive theories are both aimed towards creating a productive classroom environment in which knowledge is imparted in a manner to maximize retention and assure application. This paper aims to understand the underlying patterns of both teaching approaches and comparing and contrasting their basic assumptions, in order to test their resultant feasibility.

Learning theories revolve around the best possible methods known to educators worldwide, which can assist them in creating a productive classroom environment. As the standard of education has evolved, so has the set of strategies associated with imparting knowledge in the most industrious manner. Advance teaching techniques have seeped into the stream of traditional classes and many studious professionals have put their shoulder to the door in order to discover feasible educational theories to help all students. This paper is about the comparison between two such leading educational theories: constructivism and cognitivism. It aims to identify…

Works Cited

Cooperstein, S.E., & Kocewar-Weidinger, E. (2004). Beyond Active Learning: A Constructvist Approach to Learning. References Services Review, 32. Retrieved February 2013

Greeno, J.G., Collins, A.M., & Resnick, L.B. (n.d.). Cognition and Learning. Retrieved February 2013

Mergel, B. (1998). Instructional Design and Learning Theory. University of Saskatchewan, Educational Communications and Technology. Retrieved Februaruy 2013

Education -- Cooperative Learning Cooperative
Words: 1628 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 83427257
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The obvious implication is that the pairing of hands-on, inquiry-based active-learning teaching methods with cooperative learning holds tremendous potential for improved learning and social development of grade school students. Naturally, that would be an appropriate and likely productive area for future research in the area of effective teaching methodologies.

Conclusion

Cooperative learning has demonstrated tremendous beneficial potential as a modern educational method capable of increasing learning. Evidence also strongly suggests that cooperative learning is an equally valuable tool for increasing the educational value of academic programs for mildly disabled student populations, as well as for their integration into the mainstream student population. Beyond academic achievement, cooperative learning seems to benefit students emotionally and in terms of their development of communications and cooperation skills. Ultimately, its greatest value may be in conjunction with the more general shift toward active learning instead of the traditional focus on passive learning that has long…

Sources

Adams D. And Hamm M. (1994). New Designs for Teaching and Learning: Promoting

Active Learning in Tomorrow's Schools. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Huber RA. And Moore CJ. "A Model for Extending Hands-on Science to Be Inquiry

Based." School Science and Mathematics, Vol. 101, No. 1 (2001): 32-35.

Traditional Forms of Learning Do
Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 35922237
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It does not happen overnight; 3) eflective practice occurs best when learners work with role models; 4) as noted by Fink, instruction needs to be learner-centered, of interest to the learners and long-lasting; 5) the institution in which the nurses learn must be supportive of reflective learning.

The PICOT is a useful format for developing a clinical research question. It helps to answer questions and decrease uncertainty and determine the appropriate choice of action. In this case, the PICOT is the following:

Nursing student population

Provide long-term knowledge to make reflective decisions

Traditional learning situations

eflective practice offers several benefits over traditional learning

Time frame (optional)

eferences cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using…

References cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using Constructivism and Reflective Practice to Bridge the Theory/Practice Gap. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Diego, CA, April 13-17, 1998) ED425518 ERIC

Peters, M. (2000). Does constructivist epistemology have a place in nurse education? Journal of Nursing Education, 39, 166-172

CBT Analysis of Learning Methods and the
Words: 2414 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46975300
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CBT

Analysis of Learning Methods and the Impact of Computer-Based Training (CBT) Programs

Compare and contrast the four differences in learning styles. Propose ways a trainer can help each type of learner.

The four differences in learning styles are often characterized by convergers, divergers, assimilators and accommodators (Mumford, Honey, 1992). There are significant differences between each, and the intent of this analysis is to compare and contrast them with each other. The converger learning style typifies learners who rely on conceptual learning including visualization and abstract learning, supported by active experimentation. It is comparable to the assimilator learning style in that both rely on abstract conceptualization of learning materials and concepts, in addition to a reliance on theoretical models. The converger learning style differences from the other four in its intensity of focus on taking information and intelligence and turning it into pragmatic thought (Mumford, Honey, 1992). The other learning…

References

Bedwell, W., & Salas, E.. (2010). Computer-based training: capitalizing on lessons learned. International Journal of Training & Development, 14(3), 239-249.

Khan, B.H. (2001). A framework for Web-based learning. In B.H. Khan (Ed.), Web-based training. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.

Alice Y Kolb, & David A Kolb. (2005). Learning Styles and Learning Spaces: Enhancing Experiential Learning in Higher Education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 4(2), 193-212.

Lakshmanan, A., Lindsey, C., & Krishnan, H.. (2010). Practice Makes Perfect? When Does Massed Learning Improve Product Usage Proficiency? Journal of Consumer Research, 37(4), 599.

Technology to Enhance Learning Distance and Online Applications
Words: 2163 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65833335
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Topic:Technology to Enhance Learning: Distance & Online Applications
Instructions:
Application: Online Course Design Online education offers convenient and effective means by which nurses, nursing students, and other populations can gain valuable learning experiences. In this Application, you will design an online learning environment on a nursing-education topic of interest to you. If you would like to put your course online, you are invited to try Moodle, a free course management web application, but this is not a requirement of the assignment.To begin, review Chapter 6, EuroDesigning the Online Learning Environment," in Developing Online Learning Environments in Nursing Education (OEuro(TM)Neil, Fisher, &…

E-Learning vs Traditional Learning E-Learning
Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 16353206
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Putting someone in a classroom is only half of the feat; getting the person to want to learn and be open to knowledge and learning is another thing.

An advocacy or participatory worldview holds that "our world is co-created both by the given cosmos and by how we comprehend it and make choices within it" (Heron 2001). This type of worldview in regards to learning -- e-learning or traditional learning -- is not completely unlike the constructivism theory. Though our world is created by something outside of ourselves, how we live in that world and what we choose to do is completely up to us. This means that no matter whether we are sitting on a computer learning in our living rooms or whether we are in a classroom, what we are being offered and what we are comprehending is all up to the learner and choices are made by…

References:

Heron, J. (2001). Transpersonal co-operative Inquiry. Handbook of action research,

participative inquiry & practice (pp.333-339). CA: Sage Publications.

Daymont, Blau (year) name of publication.

Walls, John. (2000). E-learning vs. face-to-face training: and the winner is… Houston business journal. Retrieved on September 4, 2010, from the Website:

Personalized learning assessment
Words: 876 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95668939
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Since this personalized learning plan under construction is meant to be as practical as possible, it is guided mainly by two theories as previously mentioned; the Multiple Intelligence theory and constructivism. Constructivism theory in this instructional unit considers learning as an active and constructive process. On the other hand the Multiple Intelligence Theory in this unit will focus on logical-mathematical intelligence since students will use knowledge from the learning material to engage in reasoning and critical thinking for problem solving (Philips H., 2010).

The assessment will assume three main approaches; a pre-test, a formative check, and a summative assessment.

Pre-test assessment

This will aim at finding out what the students know and what they do not know in the mathematical application. It is a determination of pre-existing subject knowledge. This assessment will be done through administered test to the targeted students and observation of how they attempt to apply the…

Opportunities of a Problem-Based Learning
Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6887204
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In addition, the classic version of problem-based learning "requires students to collaborate, formulate learning issues by determining factors that may contribute to the cause or solution of a problem, identify relevant content, and generate hypotheses. Most problem-based learning models also contain student reflection components as a means of self-evaluation" (Knowlton & Sharp, 2003, pp. 5-6).

Although the positive effects of using a problem-based learning approach have been documented in a number of studies, the findings of other studies have indicated that problem-based learning may not compare favorably with more traditional teaching methods with regards to student's knowledge base, technical skills, or the resources expended; however, Dadd (2009) suggests that the benefits of using a problem-based learning approach justify the additional resources this method requires. Moreover, Simons et al. (2004) report that students using a problem-based learning approach "tend to develop more positive attitudes toward learning than students in more traditional…

References

Alavi, C. (1999). Problem-based learning in a health sciences curriculum. New York:

Routledge.

Albion, P.R. (2003). PBL + IMM = PBL2: Problem-based learning and interactive multimedia development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 11(2), 243-244.

Dadd, K.A. (2009). Using problem-based learning to bring the workplace into the classroom.

Developmental Learning and Technology
Words: 9878 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80375610
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Elementary Special Education Teachers Place Value in the use of Technology Resources for Students?

Alix Desulme

Technology is an integral part of society. Students learn through use of technology like personal computers, tablets, and e-books (Garland & Tadeja, 2013). Computers can provide access to videos, documents, and other forms of data that students have the choice of absorbing via visual or auditory methods. Tablets provide the same access but with a light-weight, touch responsive interface. Technology investment within schools not only enables varied learning opportunities for students, but it also helps students discover or improve their own ability to research and analyze information, collaborate and communicate, and solve problems (Lim, Zhao, Tondeur, Chai, & Tsai, 2013). Comment by Steve Moskowitz: Yes, this is the reason

Technology helps provide other benefits. Integrating technology in schools, especially in other areas like special education enable staff to develop new ways of teaching and…

Multiple Learning Styles in Art
Words: 1148 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8920189
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Howard Gardner's contributions to the field of education are profound, extensive, and revolutionary. His theory of multiple intelligences states that students are able to absorb, manipulate, and produce information through a variety of media. In fact, by means of his research findings, Gardner claims individuals possess different aptitudes, all of which are legitimate forms of intelligence. Naturally, his scholarship reaches educators and policy makers and changes the way in which learning is perceived and education is delivered.

The implications of the theory of multiple intelligences on curricula are considerable and open to interpretation. Some educators contend that applying this theory translates into alternative delivery of instruction so as to afford learners several points of reference. Others view pedagogical use of multiple intelligences to be an effective method of fostering students' natural abilities. Yet other instructors hold that employing multiple intelligences in education necessitates the expansion of curriculum. Gardner himself asserts…

References

Armstrong, Thomas (1996). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. New York:

Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Campbell, Linda, Campbell, Bruce & Dickinson, Dee (1998). Teaching and Learning

Through Multiple Intelligences. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Quantitative Study Review Learning Styles of Graduate Level Nursing Students
Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 23218618
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Quantitative Study Review
Abstract
This paper provides a review of a quantitative study and determines the purpose, sample, method, findings and credibility of the study. It also examines the interventions and whether there was any clinical significance to the findings. By examining the significance and credibility of the study it shows its value in nursing research.
The purpose of the study by Gonzales et al. (2017) was to describe graduate entry nursing students' learning styles. The research question was: “What are the predominant learning styles of graduate entry nursing students?” (Gonzales et al., 2017, p. 56). The study did not make any hypothesis prior to conducting the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) survey.
The sample for the study was obtained by recruiting 202 graduate entry nursing student volunteers at a southwestern university. This was essentially a convenience sample. No inclusion or exclusion criteria were discussed in the study, but in…

References
AbuAssi, N. E., & Alkorashy, H. A. E. (2016). Relationship between learning style and readiness for self-directed learning among nursing students at king Saud university, Saudi Arabia. International journal of advanced nursing studies, 5(2), 109-116.
Brannan, J. D., White, A., & Long, J. (2016). Learning styles: Impact on knowledge and confidence in nursing students in simulation and classroom. International journal of nursing education scholarship, 13(1), 63-73.
Gonzales, L. K., Glaser, D., Howland, L., Clark, M. J., Hutchins, S., Macauley, K., ... & Ward, J. (2017). Assessing learning styles of graduate entry nursing students as a classroom research activity: a quantitative research study. Nurse education today, 48, 55-61.
McKenna, L., Copnell, B., Butler, A. E., & Lau, R. (2018). Learning style preferences of Australian accelerated postgraduate pre-registration nursing students: A cross-sectional survey. Nurse education in practice, 28, 280-284.
Vizeshfar, F., & Torabizadeh, C. (2018). The effect of teaching based on dominant learning style on nursing students' academic achievement. Nurse education in practice, 28, 103-108.

Review of Problem Based Learning Sources
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Student Retention and Effective Strategies for Promoting Personal Success

Annotated Bibliography

oundations of Problem-Based Learning (Savin-Baden & Major, 2004)

This book represents one of the first attempts to compile a comprehensive text that introduces problem-based learning. Problem-based learning can be thought of as a pedagogy that is focused on providing students open-ended problems to solve. This methodology first appeared in medical schools and has since been applied to many disciplines and the academic process in general. This approach became popular in the 1960s and has increased in popularity since that time.

The approach is considered an active learning style in which students tackle problems in which they lead their own educational efforts. The instructor is considered more of a guide or a facilitator than someone who teaches in a more authoritarian position. The format is more project based and represents a shift from the more traditional lecture-based environment.

Transformational Change…

Fink, L. (2013). Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses. Jossey-Bass.

Savin-Baden, M. (2008). A Practical Guide to Problem-Based Online Learning. Routledge.

Savin-Baden, M., & Major, C. (2004). Foundations of Problem-based Learning. Open University Press.

Learning Cognitive Theory of Learning
Words: 5035 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10711915
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When children are given the option between a reward they would like and the internal desire to learn something, most children would rather have the reward. That is also true of many adults, whether they are in an educational setting or a business setting. Still, that does not mean that intrinsic interest cannot come along with extrinsic reward, or that operant theory is completely wrong. Many educators mix operant theory with cognitive theory in an effort to provide those with different learning styles more of an opportunity to learn and develop. This helps to reach the largest number of students per educator, improving the overall educational goal.

ognitive Theory of Learning

Introduction

The cognitive theory of learning has been part of education since the late 1920's, when a Gestalt psychologist focused on the issue of Gestalt teaching and learning, and what that could offer to students who were not learning…

Carton, J.S. (1996). The differential effects of tangible rewards and praise on intrinsic motivation: A comparison of cognitive evaluation theory and operant theory. The Behavior Analyst, 19, 237-255.

Cavalier, a.R., Ferretti, R.P., & Hodges, a.E. (1997). Self-management within a classroom token economy for students with learning disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 18, 167-178.

Davidson, P., & Bucher, B. (1978). Intrinsic interest and extrinsic reward: The effects of a continuing token program on continuing nonconstrained preference. Behavior Therapy, 9, 222-234.

Learning Styles the Theory of Honey and
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Learning Styles

The theory of Honey and Mumford, describes the styles and learning strategies. It incorporates much of the theory of Kolb's learning cycle, making it more intelligible.

It is important to discuss these strategies with students. (Marsick and atkins, p132-51) hile this allows the teacher to become aware of the need to vary their teaching because they do not exist in universal, it also allows learners to realize that everyone learns differently.

So its dominant learning strategies can influence its working methods and student personnel can then optimize them. It may also become more self-confidence. Honey and Mumford (1986) take away from Kolb (1984) the idea of an experiential learning model in four stages they call: experience, the return on experience, drawing conclusions and planning. (aring and Evans, p117-28)

According to them, each phase has specific behaviors and attitudes and is important to successfully complete the learning process itself.…

Works Cited

Lam, Y.L. Defining the effects of transformation leadership on organization learning: a cross-cultural comparison: School Leadership & Management, 2002, pp 439-52.

Marquardt, M. Action learning in action: Transforming problems and people for world- class organizational learning. Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black Publishing, 1999, pp45-49.

Marsick, V.J., and Watkins, KE. Demonstrating the value of an organization's learning culture: The Dimensions of Learning Organizations Questionnaire, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 2003 5, pp132-151.

Evans, C. And Graff, M. "Exploring style: enhancing the capacity to learn?," Education & Training, Vol. 50, 2008, pp. 93-102.

Active Process of Witnessing One's
Words: 3627 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 2914175
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A person working in a professional position often handles several large projects at once and supervises the activities or output of others. A working professional needs reliable time management tactics to manage time effectively for not only the quality and efficiency of work but for personal health and stress management as well. There are three steps that one can take in order to improve their time management skills.

Step 1 - One should plan each day, week and month by prioritizing tasks in order of importance and deadline. It is not possible to tackle projects competently without first evaluating the most significant tasks and the order in which they should be completed. One should separate projects that slow down their efficiency. Then, rearrange their schedule or delegate tasks to others in order to assure that they are not hung up on a project that is costing valuable hours of focus.…

References

Amulya, J. n.d. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.itslifejimbutnotasweknowit.org.uk/files/whatisreflectivepractice.pdf . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Archer, J. 2012. [ONLINE] How to Improve Time Management Skills for a Professional Role. Available at:  http://work.chron.com/improve-time-management-skills-professional-role-3009.html . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Importance of Information Technology. 2012. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/importance-of-information-technology.html . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Reflection and Reflective Practice. 2010. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/reflecti.htm . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Learning and Respiratory Care Problem-Based
Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 5012745
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In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that…

Many studies have shown that PBL students experience greater motivation toward learning than their traditional counterparts (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Beachey, 2007, Rogal & Snider, 2008). Further PBL has been associated with greater satisfaction in the learning process by physicians than its traditional counterpart (Beachey, 2007; Op't Holt, 2000; Rogal & Snider, 2008). Evaluations of PBL programs have found that not only do students take pleasure in the process, they also believe that they have the capacity to out perform their peers from traditional curricula in clinical settings (Op't Holt, 2005; Kaufman & Mann, 1996). Studies have shown that the teaching method has little bearing on the learning of academically talented students (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Distlehorst, Dawson, Robbs, & Barrows, 2005; Op't Hoyt, 2005). In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that one would expect significant improvement in clinical knowledge and performance in order to advocate for the use of PBL in the classroom due to the extensive resources that are required to utilize PBL curricula.

One would expect that PBL students would be at a significant advantage over their traditional peers due to the clinical application in the classroom (Colliver, 2000). Some

Learning Centered Classroom Conducive to Collaborative Learning
Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 84540540
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learning centered classroom conducive to collaborative learning and student involvement.

EXAMPLE: I believe that student participation is essential, particularly in a classroom of adult learners who have personal and professional experiences they can relate to the lesson at hand. I try to scaffold upon learners' existing knowledge to make lessons seem relevant to students. Compelling discussion requires a dialogue between teachers and students. Students must be treated with respect and be encouraged to act as full participants in the learning process. For example, one of my students was a nursing assistant who had valuable input regarding the changes in technology that had occurred in the medical field.

Performs Student Assessment of Learning Objectives

(B):Definition: Performs student assessment of learning objectives based on course curriculum and exit competencies.

EXAMPLE: Students are made aware of the grading criteria at the beginning of the course and before every assignment.

They are also made…

Resources

(F):Definition: Has knowledge of and utilizes available academic resources and directs each student in ways that foster a successful learning experience; integrates career-focused education into course.

EXAMPLE: I direct students to additional resources (including credible websites) where they can locate additional course- related information. I

Learning to Read and Write in English
Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21447154
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Learning to read and write in English has been one of my most treasured accomplishments in the recent past. To begin with, learning to read and write in English is in my opinion the very first step towards becoming a fluent speaker of one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. In that regard therefore, I am convinced that fluency in English is a plus as I pursue my career of choice. Given that English is one of the most common languages, corporations and most organizations would ordinarily hire individuals who can relate well with their customers and clients. Being able to read, write, and speak English will therefore give me a distinct advantage in my future job seeking endeavors. It is also important to note that fully aware that the world is increasingly becoming interconnected; the relevance of learning an additional language cannot be overstated. It is…

Works Cited

Baldwin, James. Sonny's Blues. Stuttgart: Klett Sprachen, 2009. Print.

Brinton, Margaret. 100 Little Reading Comprehension Lessons. New York: Lorenz Educational Press, 2004. Print.

Cusipag, Maria, et al. Critical Thinking through Reading and Writing. Philippines: De La Salle University Press, 2007. Print.

Learning as Well as Assessment
Words: 3633 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8900464
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(Singer, 2003, p. 36) Education should be a constructive process. Palinscar states that the teacher must assume an active and directive role by establishing the pace, content, and goals of the lesson. (Palincsar, 1998) Byra also described such a process of "task progression" through which content is broken down and sequenced into meaningful learning experiences. (Byra, 2004) the lesson learned from receiving fifty percent credit on a late assignment is not necessarily the lesson intended.

Each step in the academic process contributes to the learning process. An assignment is not merely research. It is not merely a grade. It is the sum total of the student's entire experience vis-a-vis that experience. (Bailey, Hughes & Moore, 2004, p. 32) a student who receives a grade of fifty percent because he or she completed an assignment late sees that arbitrary judgment of his or her work as a "lesson" too. Studies show…

References

 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104841091 

Alderman, M.K. (2004). Motivation for Achievement: Possibilities for Teaching and Learning (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108116439

Bailey, T.R., Hughes, K.L., & Moore, D.T. (2004). Working Knowledge: Work-Based Learning and Education Reform. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Learning Educational Psychology Multiple Choice
Words: 3789 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64594759
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A behavior resulting from injury or disease behavior resulting from experience behavior resulting from disease or drugs biologically determined behavior

Evidence that learning has occurred is seen in published research studies changes in thinking changes in behavior emotional stability

Change in performance is preceded by bad reviews scientific research the behavior of others change in disposition

If-then statements may also be referred to as principles generalization hypothesis laws

Statements which summarize relationships are restricted to the physical sciences known as hypothesis known as generalization never used in the social sciences

Rules which govern the gathering of information are known as rigid and dogmatic scientific method being flexible

APA rules for research studies

Informed consent is given by the researcher judicial review the American Psychological Association the research subject

Laws are to beliefs as truth is to untruth accuracy is to inaccuracy convictions are to facts are to convictions

Trace conditioning…

Learning Hands-On Science Learning Has
Words: 2217 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86074387
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The natural environment provides students with a calm and quiet place to unwind from the noises of the classroom. It nurtures and supports animal-life all year round. This is critical for areas where commercial and residential development is reducing most natural areas. Wildlife especially needs help during the cold and snowy months. Students can also see how it benefits the environment. It also helps connect students to the world of nature. Increasingly, because children are spending more and more times indoors, they are losing touch with nature.

Humans, because they spent their first 14,000 years in nature, have a special bond with the outdoor world. When they are taken away from this environment, through cities, lack of parks, no outdoor play, there can be psychological affects. When taking time to enjoy nature, children will feel better about themselves and the world at large.

We are also going to put a…

References

Besecker, I. (June 11, 2000). Greensoboro News and Record. Insanity of Testing Mania.

Bredderman, T. (1985). Laboratory programs for elementary school science: A meta- analysis of effects on learning. Science Education, 69(4), 577-591.

Carpenter, R. (1963). A Reading Method and an Activity Method in Elementary Science Instruction. Science Education, April.

Hake, R. (1992). Socratic Pedagogy in the Introductory Physics Laboratory. The Physics Teacher 30(9), 546-552

Learning Needs
Words: 1846 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 45296580
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Lsa

Cunningham, D. & Kelly, D. (2005). he evaluation of multiprofessional learning needs assessment tool. Education for Primary Care 2005, 16. 547-55.

his article argued for the need to evaluate the evaluation methods for needs assessment within a healthcare environment. he research for this article was compiled in Scotland where the researchers sought to find ways that health care teams can become more efficient by determining a tool to evaluate what needs to be altered or included within healthcare teams.

he article designed a tool called "QUES" that helped determine the best ways in which teams work. his qualitative evaluation helped determine how these healthcare teams may benefit from this or any other similar assessment tool. he research ultimately concluded that this type of assessment tool can be used by healthcare staffs to identify their non-clinical learning needs. his information is important because it highlights the need for self-improvement through…

This research is useful because it offers another example of a tool that has been tested in an real world situation. The article suggested that a needs assessment tool using interviews and observation provides the necessary structure to cover the many open ended problems and questions encountered by the nurse on a daily basis. The ideas are explained from several different perspectives including the nurse educator, the staff nurse and the nurse manager offer a useful explanation for how needs must be tailored to a specific cause or purpose.

Poulton, B., Lyons, A. & O'Callaghan, A. (2008). A comparative study of self-perceived public health competencies: practice teachers and qualifying SCPHNs. Community Practitioner, Sep 2008, 81, 9.

This article is a look at the technological aspects of needs assessment within the nursing profession. The article is premised upon the idea that computer skills are recognized as essential for success in the nursing education and in general nursing practice. This research reported on the perspectives of nursing students and how they view their own computer skills. This inquiry aimed to learn about self-identifying learning needs assessment and relating it to the technological skills assumed to be necessary for professional success. This article is beneficial because it suggested that many students need help with basic computer skills within the nursing educational realms. As a result the research predicted that this problem will continue for years unless it is properly addressed within the learning cycle. To help remedy this problem, the research suggested that a computer graded assessment tool would be an effective tool to address the problems highlighted throughout the article.

Learning to Read
Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 31401527
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Early Childhood

In "Emergent Literacy," uth Wilson claims that formal reading instruction "especially if introduced too early…can actually interfere with emergent literacy," (p. 1). The author bases her claim on personal observation with her own children, as well as on empirical evidence related to early childhood literacy education. Using a combination of anecdotal and empirical evidence strengthens the author's stance, and offers a rich opportunity for personal reflection. Wilson does not disparage structured or formal literacy training in early childhood. Instead, she calls for a more organic approach that stresses parental engagement.

Wilson cites evidence from a number of sources showing that literacy emerges in many different settings, and is not dependent on print. Folk practices, including playing with sounds and simply engaging children with words, can be as effective if not more, in helping immerse the child in a literate universe. Finally, Wilson emphasizes the importance of the home…

Reference

Wilson, R.A. (n.d.). Emergent literacy. Early Childhood News. Retrieved online:  http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=212

Learning to Use Technology in Class
Words: 2212 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97136931
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Planning Process

Explain in detail how you will address each of the needs identified in part 2 include changes necessary for environment, engagement, application, and tools. Make sure to include a list of technology resources currently available and those that must be purchased.

State Goals and Objectives with Local Strategies and Measures

Environment The changes necessary for the environment involve going from one based on the physical environment to one that is predicated on a cloud-based environment. In this regard, the change is mostly one of architecture. Virtually all applications and requisite software the students and instructors will use will be accessed through the cloud.

Engagement The means of engagement will be the Bring Your Own Device phenomenon, in which students utilize their own mobile devices for the purpose of working in the classroom. Those without such devices will be provided the most accessible ones (a smart phone) via the…

Learning More About What Processes Change the Surface of the Earth
Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72161887
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Structural Geology and Plate Tectonics

This concerns the changes in the formation of the earth crust and mantle from the smallest to the largest, such as a series of mountains (UWYO, 2011). Conducting a study of these changes requires a conduct of fieldwork in coordination with other scientific disciplines, such as geophysics, geochemistry and petrology. The University of Wyoming has conducted such fieldwork on the different active and ancient areas of crustl and mantle changes. This fieldwork continues at present on topics, including continental and oceanic extensional tectonics, aboriginal arc-continental collisions, fault systems, crustal studies, fold and fault features and direct dating of these changes (UWYO).

These studies looked into the Archean depths in Wyoming province, the Rocky Mountain, the Alps, the Colorado River, the Carribean and the San Andres fault (UWYO, 2011). Researchers have swam and dug into thousands of meters into the ocean in order to look and…

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Noble, M.A. (2015). Processes that shape the surface of the earth. Vol. 11 Earth System History

and Natural Variability: Encyclopedia of Life Support System. Retrieved on July 17, 2015

from http://www.eolss.net/Sample-Chapters/C12/F1-01-03/pdf

UWYO (2011). Structural geology and tectonics. Department of Geology and Geophysics:

Becoming a Learning Organization
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Learning Organization is defined as an organization with an ingrained philosophy for anticipating, reacting and responding to change, complexity and uncertainty. It is an organization where you cannot not learned because learning is interwoven into the fabric of the day-to-day business. The concept of the Learning Organization is increasingly relevant given the increasing difficulty and uncertainty of the global business environment. Unfortunately, the Learning Organization has been a long time in coming, and by most accounts it has not yet arrived. The concept of a learning organization is a paradigm shift from the way business has traditionally been done.

One of the characteristics of a learning organization is that it moves beyond simple employee training to more of an environment that stresses problem solving, innovation, and learning. Organizations that embody the traits of such an environment consist of five areas, or disciplines, that make a learning organization what it is.…

Bibliography

Beller, J. (n.d). The Importance of Shifting to Learning Organizations. Retrieved January 20,2005, from the World Wide Web site: http://216.109.117.135/search/cache?p=%22five+disciplines+of+a+learning+organization%22& ei=UTF-8& fl=0& u=www.justinbeller.com/samples/the_importance_of_shifting_to_learning_organizations.pdf& w=%22five+disciplines+of+a+learning+organization%22& d=BCBF846FF1& icp=1& .international=us

Larsen, K. (1996). Learning Organizations. Retrieved January 21,2005, from the World Wide Web site: http://home.nycap.rr.com/klarsen/learnorg/index.html#tea

Nathans, H. (2000). Double Loop Learning (C. Argyris). Retrieved January 20,2005, from Hannah Nathans and Enneagram Web site:http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:vD2jeJuRGosJ:www.iac.wur.nl/iaclo/htmlarea/docs/msp/DoubleLoopLearning.doc+%22concept+of+double-loop+learning+%22& hl=en

Santos, A. (n.d). Peter M. Senge, "The Leader's New Work: Building Learning Organizations," in Sloan Management Review (Fall 1990), pp. 7-23. Retrieved January 21,2005, from Aldo Santos Web site: http://home.nycap.rr.com/klarsen/learnorg/senge2.html

Theoretical Foundations of Teaching and Learning
Words: 2539 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64313066
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Learning & Teaching

Identify a behavior in the healthcare setting that you would like to change that involves extinguishing an undesirable behavior and replacing it with a healthier behavior (e.g., getting cardiac patients to reduce their high-fat diet and eat healthier foods; getting patients with low back pain to minimize their pain and become more independent in their activities). Describe how the behavior could be changed using the principles of a particular learning theory. Then describe how the same behavior could be changed using a different theory. Depending on the behavior to be changed and replaced, you might also discuss why one plan might work better for men than women, or for younger people than older people.

To start with the last sentence first, it is clear that the younger a person is, they are generally more pliable and "changeable" than with older and/or more mature people that are more…

References

Behlol, M., & Dad, H. (2010). Concept of Learning. International Journal Of

Psychological Studies, 2(2), 231-239.

Bradshaw, M.J. (2013). Innovative teaching strategies in nursing and related health professions (6th ed.). New York, NY: Jones & Bartlett.

DeYoung, P.A. (2003). Relational psychotherapy: a primer. New York: Brunner-

Kolb Learning Styles
Words: 751 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 42999161
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Learning Styles

Based on Kolb's model of learning styles, I am a Diverger. This means that I am oriented towards reflective observation rather than active experimentation -- strongly in my case -- and I am also oriented slightly to concrete experience over abstract conceptualization. The characteristics of the Diverger style of learning are that I perceive information concretely, but process reflectively. So I am imaginative, believe in my own experience and am an insight thinker (Kolb, 2013).

When I thought about how I would learn how to plant a rose garden, I guess the first thing is that I thought about it. I assume somebody more oriented towards active experimentation might just dive right in and start digging, figuring out the details as they go along. For me, I went straight for the Internet to get a list of things to do and a list of pitfalls to watch out…

References

Kolb, D. (2013). Kolb's model of learning styles. LifeCircle Inc.. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from http://www.lifecircles-inc.com/Learningtheories/constructivism/kolb.html

No author. (2014). Kolb learning styles. Business Balls.com. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from  http://www.businessballs.com/kolblearningstyles.htm

Deep Learning Is Among the Best Strategies for Students
Words: 697 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18147887
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Learning Styles -- Academic Performance

There has been a great deal of scholarly research done on how students learn, and how certain learning styles impact the academic outcomes. This paper delves into four scholarly research papers that describe learning styles and the subsequent academic achievements that result from those learning styles.

Deep Learning is Preferable to Surface Learning

Several learning styles were used in a research project involving 273 Social Science students at a British university. The learning styles being rated and observed (part of Vermunt's Inventory of Learning Styles) included "deep learning," "self-regulated learning," "intrinsic motivation," and "constructivist conception of learning." In the research, these four styles of learning were seen as preferable to "surface learning," "teacher-centered learning," "extrinsic motivation," and "objectivist conception of learning" (Boyle, et al., 2003). The most acceptable learning style in terms of the student achieving positive academic gains was "deep learning," which requires the…

Works Cited

Boatman, K., Courtney, R., and Lee, W. (2008). "See How They Learn": The Impact of Faculty and Student Learning Styles on Student Performance in Introductory

Economics. The American Economist, 52(1), 39-52.

Boyle, E. A., Duffy, T., and Dunleavy, K. (2003). Learning styles and academic outcome:

The validity and utility of Vermunt's Inventory of Learning Styles in a British higher education setting. British Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 73, 267-290.

Personal Learning Styles Learning Style After Completing
Words: 1116 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61468858
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Personal Learning Styles

Learning Style

After completing the VAK questionnaire, I have learned that out of the four types of learners, I have strong tendencies for three out of the four types. I am mostly a visual and read/write learner with equal scores in both areas. Furthermore, with a score very close to the first two categories, I am also a kinesthetic learner. Lastly, with the lowest score, I am an aural learner. Compared to how I perceive my own learning styles outside of this questionnaire, I mostly agree. I think I am mostly a visual and kinesthetic learner.

I do learn by reading and writing, as well as aurally, but not as much. They are not so much my preference for learning, but I cannot deny that those aspects assist my understanding. Some people are not the best at public speaking or giving instructions, and that is why I…

References:

Advanology. (2012). The Visual-Spatial Learning Style. Web, Available from:  http://www.learning-styles-online.com/style/visual-spatial/ . 2012 October 02.

LangVid Language Training. (2010). Studying Style: Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners. Web, Available from:  http://www.studyingstyle.com/tactile-kinesthetic-learners.html . 2012 October 02.

The Study Gurus. (2012). Study Advice for Reading and Write Learners. Web, Available from: http://www.thestudygurus.com/read-write-study-tips/. 2012 October 02.

3). Review the other learning styles: visual, aural, read/write, kinesthetic, and multimodel (listed on the VARK Questionnaire Result page). 4). Compare your preferred learning strategies to the identified srategies for your learning style. 5). Appraise how this will change your way of stuying, if any. In a paper (750-1,000 words), summarise your analysis of this exercise. include the following: 1). Provide a summary of your learning style. 2). List your preferred learning srategies. 3). Compare your preferred learning strategies to the identified strategies for your preferred learning style. 4). Appraise any changes you need to make in your study habits.

Significance and Features of Learning Organizations
Words: 1292 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49201667
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organization "that is able to change its behaviors and mind-sets as a result of experience" is referred to as a learning organization (Milton-Kelly, n.d.). The concept of learning is, in reality, not as easy as it sounds, and organizations often find themselves having to grapple with the negative consequences of repetitive dysfunctional behaviors brought about by the refusal to accept and acknowledge certain truths (Milton-Kelly, n.d.). The tendency to repeat initiatives because they failed to produce the desired outcome in the previous attempt is, though very common, not characteristic of a learning organization. A number of questions then arise; what features constitute a learning organization? Why should all organizations strive to become learning environments? This text provides answers to these questions.

The Significance of Learning Environments

Learning is crucial to the success of any organization, especially in this era of globalization (OAGC, 1992). Organizations today operate in a fast-paced, rapidly…

References

Gallardo, L. (2012). Brands and Rousers: The Holistic System to Foster High-Performing Business Brands and Careers. London: LID Publishing.

Milton-Kelly, E. (n.d.). What are the Characteristics of a Learning Organization? GEMI. Retrieved from  http://www.gemi.org/metricsnavigator/eag/What%20are%20the%20Characteristics%20of%20a%20Learning%20Organization.pdf 

OAGC. (1992). Chapter 5 -- the Learning Organization. Office of the Auditor General of Canada. Retrieved from  http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_199212_05_e_8058.html 

Smith, M. (2001). Peter Senge and the Learning Organization. INFED. Retrieved from  http://infed.org/mobi/peter-senge-and-the-learning-organization/

Prior Learning Portfolio
Words: 1604 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3659201
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learning experiene. The writer demonstrates how to put together a prior learning and prior experiene portfolio for the purpose of demonstrating urrent knowledge due to that prior experiene.

A omprehensive look at the management of one's personal finanes; overs budgeting, use of and ost of redit, life and property insurane, inome and state taxation, housing, wills, trusts, estate planning, and savings and investments.

You must reall and write one or more "learning events" for eah of the key terms listed on the ourse desription you have obtained. By using Kolb's model to guide your storytelling, you will assist your faulty assessor, the person who will evaluate your PLA portfolio for redit, to loate and appreiate your learning outomes.

In short, your task in writing your PLA portfolio essay is to address all listed ourse ontent areas and to do so via speifi stories told in terms of the Kolb Model.…

cited in Tennant 1996) highlights, there is a need to take account of differences in cognitive and communication styles that are culturally-based. Here we need to attend to different models of selfhood - and the extent to which these may differ from the 'western' assumptions that underpin the Kolb and Fry model.

The idea of stages or steps does not sit well with the reality of thinking. There is a problem here - that of sequence. As Dewey (1933) has said in relation to reflection a number of processes can occur at once, stages can be jumped. This way of presenting things is rather too neat and is simplistic - see reflection.

Empirical support for the model is weak (Jarvis 1987; Tennant 1997). The initial research base was small, and there have only been a limited number of studies that have sought to test or explore the model (such as Jarvis 1987). Furthermore, the learning style inventory 'has no capacity to measure the degree of integration of learning styles' (Tennant 1997: 92).

The relationship of learning processes to knowledge is problematic. As Jarvis (1987) again points out, David Kolb is able to show that learning and knowledge are intimately related. However, two problems arise here. David Kolb doesn't really explore the nature of knowledge in any depth. In chapter five of Experiential Learning he discusses the structure of knowledge from what is basically a social psychology perspective. He doesn't really connect with the rich and varied debates about the nature of knowledge that raged over the centuries within philosophy and social theory. This means that I do not think he really grasps different ways of knowing. For example, Kolb focuses on processes in the individual mind, rather than seeing learning as situated. Second, for David Kolb, learning is concerned with the production of knowledge. 'Knowledge results from the combination of grasping experience and transforming it' (Kolb 1984: 41). Here we might contrast this position with Paulo Freire. His focus is upon informed, committed action (praxis).

Given these problems we have to take some care approaching David Kolb's vision of experiential learning. However, as Tennant (1997: 92) points out, 'the model provides an excellent framework for planning teaching and learning activities and it can be usefully employed as a guide for understanding learning difficulties, vocational counselling, academic advising and so on'.

Managing a Multimedia Learning Environment
Words: 3283 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59280858
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learning and teaching has drastically changed all over the world, in general, and in America, in particular. This is because of the sudden increase of information technology. Of late, both the teachers and learners, all over the world, have come to the realization that the old technologies cannot compete with the latest technological developments when it comes down to the practice of teaching and the process of learning. Therefore, the old technologies are being quickly replaced by the new multimedia technologies. It is important to note here that multimedia and its ever-increasing technological products have become very popular tools of both teaching and learning. This is because it allows the learners to pace their training in line with their capacity to learn; it allows the learners to gain control over the process of learning; and it allows the learning process to be individualized. The transformation of the methodology and approach…

Bibliography

Sorel Reisman. Multimedia Computing: Preparing for the 21st Century. Harrisburg:IDEA Group Publishing. 1994.

Shousan Wang. Multimedia and Some of Its Technical Issues. International Journal of Instructional Media. Volume: 27. Issue: 3. 2000.

Patricia Deubel. An Investigation of Behaviorist and Cognitive Approaches to Instructional Multimedia Design. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia. Volume: 12. Issue: 1. 2003.

Challenges for Learning Organizations
Words: 3067 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 95601117
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Learning Organization

Prelude

The present enterprises are up against strict challenges, of which the most strenuous are fast technology adaptation, worldwide competition and clients demand for enhanced quality. This is just the tip of the iceberg. A company needs to adhere to changes fast accordingly so as to survive in the global environment. So, in short, knowledge and continual learning are crucially imperative. The competitive advantage for any company is knowledge. But according to Dr. Yogesh Malhotra (2003), initiating chairman as well as chief knowledge Architect of BINT Institute, LLC states that, 'Knowledge is a competitive tool only in cases where action oriented approach is taken. Competitive advantage is plausible when information is translated into substantial action'. A key method of creating wealth of knowledge and resources into formidable action is via instituting a learning organization (Gardiner et al., 2001).

In this paper, the focus is to examine the learning…

References

Driver, M. (2002). The learning organization: Foucauldian gloom or Utopian sunshine. Human Relations 55 (1): 33- 53.

Elkjaer, B. (2001). "The Learning Organization: an Undelivered Promise" in Stafylarakis, Eldridge (2008). Understanding the Learning Organization. Unit 5, Human Resource Development. Institute of Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester.

Ellinger, D., Alexander E., Baiyin Y. And Shelly W. (2003). Making the Business Case for the Learning Organization Concept. Advances in Developing Human Resources 5(2): 163- 172.

Gardiner, P., Mike L., Eugene S. (2001). "Learning in Organizations: HR Implications and Considerations" in Stafylarakis, Eldridge (2008). Understanding the Learning Organization: Unit 5, Human Resource Development. Institute of Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester.

Continuous Learning in Organizations
Words: 4264 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 74262239
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Learning in Organizations

Continuous Learning

This assignment is a review journal for the book 'Continuous Learning in Organizations: Individual, Group, and Organizational Perspectives', by Sessa & London (2006).

Preface & Preliminary Material

I like to read the introductory material for books before diving in. It gives one a hint of the author's personal thinking, motivations, and other insights. In this preface the authors explain how the book was put together, with the input from individuals as well as corporate involvement, including 'focus' or discussion groups addressing the topic of 'Continuous Learning: what does it mean?'.

I found this statement about the rapidity of ongoing change to be thought-provoking: 'These changes raise the potential of rewards for those with insight' (Sessa & London, 2006: ix). The authors define learning for each of the three categories (individual, group, and organization), and talk about its importance. They also state that their purpose is…

References

Sessa, V.I. & London, M. (2006). Continuous Learning in Organizations: Individual, Group, and Organizational Perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN: 0-8058-5018-X.

Special Ed Learning Disabilities Chart
Words: 696 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 90030934
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Specifically, the parents want their son's teachers to help him not only learn, but to be able to receive instruction from others. So far, they are fairly pleased with the progress that they have seen their son make in the classroom, but wish the teachers could develop more large-group activities and take the time to really make sure their son was a full participant, which they feel would help him to progress socially more than the often individualized instruction he receives.

The difficulty, they acknowledge, is that individualized instruction is how he learns best, and with a class the size of his they understand that the teachers couldn't focus their attention on him during a large group project. Still, they are hopeful that new ideas might come up that will improve his situation even more, and they continue to work closely with the teachers regarding his progress.

eferences

LDA. (209).…

References

LDA. (209). Learning disabilities association of America. Accessed 2 October 2009. http://www.ldanatl.org/

WV Dept. Of Education. 92009). "Schools of Brooke County." Accessed 2 October 2009.  http://wvde.state.wv.us/ed_directory/index.html?county_id=10 

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Disorder / impairment Characetristics Teaching Strategy Example

Preferences in Learning Between American
Words: 23082 Length: 65 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 88878710
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The trainer will then focus on the steps to be taken to develop new skills. For example, if the trainer wants to talk about motivating, leading, negotiating, selling or speaking, it is best to start with what the learners do well before showing some chart on Maslow's theory, Posner's leadership practices, or selling skills from some standard package that has been develop elsewhere. Many foreign trainers make grave errors because they do not consider the values and beliefs of the trainee's culture. Training must make a fit with the culture of those being trained, including the material being taught, as well as the methods being used (Schermerhorn, 1994).

Abu-Doleh (1996) reports that Al-Faleh (1987), in his study of the culture influences on management development, asserts that "a country's culture has a great influence on the individual and managerial climate, on organizational behaviour, and ultimately on the types of management development…

Adult Learning Andragogy Adult Learning as a
Words: 2887 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17218108
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Adult Learning: Andragogy

Adult learning as a concept was first introduced in Europe in the 50s (QOTFC, 2007). ut it was in the 70s when American practitioner and theorist of adult education Malcolm Knowles formulated the theory and model he called andragogy. He defined andragogy as "the art and science of helping adults learn (Zmeryov, 1998 & Fidishun, 2000 as qtd in QOTFC)." It consists of assumptions on how adults learn, with emphasis on the value of the process. Andragogy approaches are problem-based and collaborative as compared with the didactic approach in younger learners. It likewise emphasizes the equality between the teacher and the learner (QOTFC).

Adult Learning Principles

Knowles developed these principles from observed characteristics of adult learners. They have special needs and requirements different from those of younger learners (Lieb, 1991). Adults are internally motivated and self-directed. They bring life experiences and knowledge into their learning experiences. They…

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chen, I. (2008). Constructivism. College of Education: University of Houston. Retrieved on June 6, 2011 from http://viking.coe.uh.edu/~ichn/ebook/et-it/constr.htm

Corley M.A. (2008). Experiential learning theory. California Adult Literacy Professional

Development Project. CALPRO: California Department of Education. Retrieved on June 13, 2011 from  http://www.calpro-online.org/documents/AdultLearningTheoriesFinal.pdf 

Kolb, D.A. et al. (1999). Experiential learning theory. "Perspectives on Cognitive

Web-Based Learning and Online Courses
Words: 321 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 46182341
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Hyperlinked tables of contents and indexes are tremendous time-savers as well as navigational aides. The non-linear presentation of digital texts appeals to learners adept at spatial relations, or those who appreciate metaphors. Hypertext allows learners to create and understand conceptual links between current course material and new or prior knowledge.

The multimedia presentation of digital text appeals to learners who rely on multiple senses including sight and hearing. Many students do not respond to purely verbal course material. The greatest strength of digital course materials may be its interactivity. Learners take an active role in their education when they can control the reading experience. Therefore, online texts replete with hyperlinks and multimedia content provide a wealth of opportunity for enhanced learning. The addition of instant messaging and related forms of digital communications make feedback and assessment methods more…

Adult Learning Styles in the
Words: 7981 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98200563
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For countries such as the U.S. And France, these needs can be reasonably expected to relate to the respective national cultures involved. For instance, in their book, Education in France, Corbett and Moon (1996) report, "An education system needs to justify itself constantly by reference to the values which underpin a nation's culture. In a democracy it is expected to transmit a range of intellectual, aesthetic and moral values which permeate the curriculum and approaches to teaching and learning" (p. 323).

Just as the United States has been confronted with a number of challenges in recent decades in identifying the best approach to providing educational services for an increasingly multicultural society, France has experienced its fair share of obstacles in this regard as well. According to Corbett and Moon, "In societies forced to come to terms with change, values are always challenged. French society, like others, had to adapt to…

References

Atkinson, R.D. (2006, May-June). Building a more-humane economy. The Futurist, 40(3), 44.

Blanchard, E. & Frasson, C. (2005). Making intelligent tutoring systems culturally aware: The use of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Montreal, Quebec Canada: Computer Science Department, HERON Laboratory.

Bryant, S.M., Kahle, J.B. & Schafer, B.A. (2005). Distance education: A review of the contemporary literature. Issues in Accounting Education, 20(3), 255.

Calder, J. (1993). Disaffection and diversity: Overcoming barriers for adult learners. London: Falmer Press.

Participant Observer Is an Active Participant in
Words: 1613 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10473287
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participant observer is an active participant in the ongoing activities and records observations from this perspective (no author, 2013). This role is used in certain settings, for example in ethnographies, action research and case studies (Iacono, Brown & Holtham, 2009). Participant observation is typically used when there are special insights to be gained from being a participating, as opposed to a passive, observer. However, participant observation has its limits, in particular the subjectivity that creeps into this type of observation can be higher when one is a participant. Most often, participant observation is reserved for research that will benefit from the recording of these subjective experiences. A good central research question that would demand participant observation might be "Are post-IPO investors purely rational?" Such a study addresses one of the key assumptions in efficient market hypothesis (rational investors) using a participant observation study set on an investment bank trading floor…

References

Iacono, J., Brown, A. & Holtham, C. (2009). Research methods -- A case example of participant observation. Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods. Vol. 7 (1) 39-46.

No author. (2013). Participant observation. University of California Davis. Retrieved November 13, 2013 from  http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/sommerb/sommerdemo/observation/partic.htm 

Tally, B. & Goldenberg, L. (2005). Fostering historical thinking with digitized primary sources. Journal of Research on Technology in Education. Vol. 38 (1) 1-21.