Bilingualism Essays (Examples)

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Bilingualism's Effects On Children
In 1989, Howard Gardner first proposed the theory of multiple intelligences. His theory posits that every human being is equipped with several kinds of intelligence that are interdependent. He developed his theory as a way to improve and challenge current practices in many fields, including education, child development, and even neuroscience. One of the intelligences he proposes is that of linguistic intelligence. To be able to learn and master a language is a specific form of intelligence that is valuable and vital personally and professionally in the 21st century. Parents and other kinds of alternative families around the world are growing in their awareness in the challenges and benefits of raising children in a bilingual environment and even in multilingual environments. This paper will consider the affects of raising children as bilingual with specific attention to how bilingualism affects areas such as learning, language acquisition, identity, and….

Bilingualism
The subject of bilgualism and its impact on cognitive development has always been an in interest of mine. When I first learned Spanish, I went to Mexico. I arrived in a small town, was dropped off by friends and started a six-week intensive course in Spanish and lived with a Mexican family. I did not even know how to say "Buenas Dias." The town I went to was San Miguel De Allende, and it has a large foreign English-speaking community. This was unfortunate since it meant I had many opportunities to revert to English rather than practicing my new language.

I will never forget my struggle to put together my first sentences in Spanish. Learning another language can be a humbling experience. So when I returned to the States, I had great sympathy for non-English speaking children who arrived at first grade and were instructed in English. In effect, these children….


This can be seen with regard to the issue of codeswitching in bilingual children. As Scheu (1999) states, the effects of culture and context are extremely important in bilingualism. This refers to language choice as well as observed linguistic phenomena such as codeswitching. Codeswitching refers to when "…bilinguals code-switch or mix their languages during communication" (Heredia and Brown). Scheu ( 1999) finds "…codeswitching as a significant feature of bilinguals' speech repertoire and it offers strong evidence of the interdependence of bilingualism and biculturalism" (Scheu 2000, p.131).

The importance of cultural contact in bilingualism is underscored in a study by Barbara Pearson ( 2007). The study explores key cultural factors that affect whether a child in a multilingual environment will become bilingual. The factors that were found to be influential in the choice of bilingualism were language status, access to literacy, family language use, and community support, including schooling ( Pearson, 2007,….

Bilingualism:
First and second language acquisition theorists

Experience as a bilingual person

The term bilingual is used for the individuals that are having a command over more than one communication system. The learning process for the second language is elaborated in the work below. The detailed definition of bilingualism and work of first and second language theorists is also presented in the relevant sections. Later, the influence of reading through the literature and my personal experience as bilingual person is also presented. Finally the conclusion provides an understanding of the future desire for learning bilingual process and education system is also presented in the conclusion.

Bilingualism:

According to Baker (2011) bilingualism is denoted as two systems or more than two systems as multilingualism. The usage of more than one communication system in terms of identity, personality, thinking, reading, education, and employment has roots wasted in bilingualism. There are various theorists and aspects of bilingualism. There….

Children of parents whose native language is not English should begin learning both languages as early as possible, ideally, simultaneously when they first begin to acquire spoken language so that they will develop the fullest and most fluent bilingualism possible.
The main argument against bilingualism does not refute the value of speaking multiple languages; instead, it reflects the concern that when children are taught only their parents' native language, they should not receive academic instruction in any language other than English only because doing so delays and inhibits their absorption of English language skills. There may be some merit to that position but the solution is not simply to refuse to provide any language accommodations for English as second language (ESL). Specifically, if academic lessons are provided in foreign languages in ways that do not effectively encourage learning English, the likely consequences would be to perpetuate their inability to assimilate….

Bilingualism The concept of bilingualism is common across the globe in the contemporary society for instance in Europe 56% are known to speak in a language other than their mother tongue. This trend is seen to both facilitate cross cultural communication and enhancing cognitive abilities of individuals. Those that are bilingual are known to be better in attention and task switching than those who are monolingual due to the capability to inhibit one language while using another. Children under the age of seven who are bilingual are also known to be better at coping with the environmental changes than the monolingual children.
Language is the essential tool that we use to understand the world around us and to communicate our feelings and thoughts. It is also the tool we use to connect cross-culturally. Though the US is widely known to be monolingual, one fifth of over five years population are known to….

(Linton)
One Turning Point One prominent turning point for the opposition of bilingualism occurred with Peal and Lambert's (1962) study, as after their study, "bilingualism became recognized as having a cognitive advantage. (Palij and Homel, 1987; cited by Takakuwa, 2000) Peal and Lambert (1962; cited by Takakuwa, 2000) studied ten-year-olds from French schools in Montreal, Canada, and found that on 15 out of 18 measures of intelligence, scores of their participating bilingual group totaled higher than the monolingual group. No differences were found between the two groups on the other measures in their study, however, on measures of both verbal and nonverbal intelligence. The bilingual group's scores totaled higher than the monolingual group. Recent research on bilingualism reveals an opposing view continues to challenge bilingualism's positive effect on children's cognitive development. (Bialystok 1988; Day and Shapson 1996; Palij and Home, 1987; cited byTakakuwa, 2000) Findings from Peal and Lambert (1962;….

Bilingual Policies
One of the most controversial issues facing today's policy makers in the United States is the issue of bilingualism. The United States currently has a significant minority population whose first language is Spanish and not English. Complicating this fact further, many of these people are Puerto Rican in origin or family ethnicity. As such, they are United States citizens, but the majority of those living in Puerto Rico speak little or no English, and a significant number of those who have moved to the mainland have Spanish as their first language.

Residents of Puerto Rico have been American citizens since 1917 (Rubenstein, 2001). As such, they have the advantages of American citizenship from birth. In spite of this status, some report that as a group, Puerto Ricans are slower to assimilate into the larger, English-dominant American society (Rubenstein, 2001), which some feel sets them apart from groups of people who….

Cruickshank, K. (2008). Arabic-English bilingualism in Australia. In J. Cummins and N.H. Hornberger (eds), Encyclopedia of Language and Education, 2nd Ed., Vol. 5: Bilingual Education, 281 -- 291. Springer Science & Business Media LLC.
Bilingualism, a sociolinguistic phenomenon growing out of language contact situations, is an object of fruitful study. Arabic-English bilingualism in New South Wales (NSW) was examined by Cruickshank (2008), focusing mostly on the issues related to the teaching of Arabic in community, Primary, and Secondary schools and language attitudes. Cruickshank ends with a prediction of further shifts from Arabic to English with through the impact of several factors on language attitudes toward Arabic as an immigrant language, such as segmentation of socioeconomic status "and the ethnic/language backgrounds of students," technological advances and the effect of international migration, and organizations and facilities being established "as the Arabic-speaking communities become more established" (288-290).

Beginning with a historical overview of the Arabic….

Childhood Second Language Learning and Subtractive ilingualism
During the past five decades, the phenomenon of understanding how language is acquired has intrigued historians, theorists and scholars alike. Although language learning can occur at many different stages in one's lifetime, the vast bulk of the research has focused on children who grow up learning one language in the home (L1), while simultaneously learning the second language (L2), usually as a result of schooling. One of the main issues addressed most frequently is whether bilingual children are able to differentiate and keep the linguistic systems of their two languages apart from each other in the context of simultaneous acquisition (olonyai, 1998). Additional research has pointed out that young bilingual children may not maintain their languages balanced and intact because the bilingual development does not occur in a socially stable environment. This perspective theorizes that bilingual acquisition may result in various types and degrees….

Using Additive Bilingualism to Address Subtractive Educational Challenge among Hispanic-American LearnersIntroductionLatin Americans largest color population will account for about half of student growth over the next decade. Latin Americans are also the least educated of any ethnic group (Nuez, amalho & Cuero, 2010). Promoting the success of Latino Americans and other colored students is a major concern of educational systems that serve more diverse student organizations and become increasingly accountable to external institutions. Conversely, the population of teachers does not reflect this demography, as the majority of teachers/lecturers in American learning institutions are white. This divergence means that most teachers are unaware of their students daily experiences such as cultural background, dialect, family, home, and community. Because teachers tend to draw educational examples from their own experiences, these connections are not made for students.Moreover, Hispanics in the United States have historically suffered from ridicule and abuse from mainstream cultures due….

Inuktitut in Modern Inuit Communities in Northern Canada
The role of language in identity construction of the Inuit in Nunavik (Quebec, Canada), which nourishes the evolution of their ethno-territorial movement in the eastern Canadian Arctic, had been around since the 1970s. This paper is an analysis of the legal-political context of the Quebec State then enables the detachment of the cornerstones of its policy speech in general, and finally those with respect to the indigenous population, in particular to the Inuit language.

There are eight major Inuit communities: those of the LABADO, the UNGAVA, and the BAFFIN, of Iglulik, the CAIBOU, of Netsilik and Copper as well as the Inuit of the Western Arctic (which replaced MACKENZIE INUIT). There are five main dialects Inuit in Canada Inuvialuktun, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut and inuttut grouped under a single language, Inuktitut or Inuktitut. (McGrath 2007) At the last census, 70% of Inuit said they knew the….

Official Language Movement: Hispanic Cultural Interest
The focus of this work is the official language movement and bilingualism in education politics in the United States, which is an important Hispanic-American cultural interest.

One of the fastest growing groups in the United States is the group of Hispanics and it was reported in the 1990 U.S. census that there were 22.4 million Hispanics or Latinos in the United States, which was up from 14.5 million in 1980. (Garcia, 2011, paraphrased) Hispanics are reported to be concentrated in the states of California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois, all of these states that when taken together "comprise over half of the electoral vote majority needed for election to the presidency." (Garcia, 2011)

Age a Key Factor that Limits Political Participation

There are several factors that are reported to hinder the political participation of Hispanics as well as hindering their development "into a unified voting bloc."….

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Advantage of Bilingual Children in Cognition

Psychology 317, Fall 2012

Knowing several languages heightens one's status in society and can widen opportunities in professional and personal arenas. There have been a number of studies showing bilingualism is also beneficial to the brain's activity, and the interaction of synapses and passages in the brain (Harris 1992). The changes in the brain would be much stronger in bilingual children, who are the main focus this research. A review of the literature on children who are bilingual compares them with children who are not (Bialystok 2011).

Advantages to bilingualism

As has been discussed, there are advantages to being bilingual beyond knowing another language. In children, bilingualism results in flexible cognition overall. Because a child knows more word for an object, he or she gains a more complex understanding of the world around them (Kovacs 2009). The bilingual child is able to be more knowledgeable, even though….

Minority Rights Revolution
The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s brought about several concordant social changes in the United States. What began as primarily an attempt to liberate African-Americans from continued systematic oppression in the form of school segregation Jim Crow laws turned out to be as much of a boon to American women and minority groups other than blacks, especially Latinos. Among the issues shared in common by all oppressed groups include voting rights, equal access to education, and equal employment opportunities. Creating social programs and institutions to provide especially for the needs of all minority groups was a logical extension of the Civil Rights movement, which appealed to women and Latinos as well as to African-Americans. The design of blanket-institutions and legislation was definitely a step in the right direction, as oppressed groups do suffer from similar forms and consequences of discrimination. However as John D. Skrentny points out….

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11 Pages
Essay

Communication - Language

Bilingualism's Effects on Children in 1989 Howard

Words: 3410
Length: 11 Pages
Type: Essay

Bilingualism's Effects On Children In 1989, Howard Gardner first proposed the theory of multiple intelligences. His theory posits that every human being is equipped with several kinds of intelligence that…

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2 Pages
Essay

Communication - Language

Bilingualism the Subject of Bilgualism and Its

Words: 636
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Bilingualism The subject of bilgualism and its impact on cognitive development has always been an in interest of mine. When I first learned Spanish, I went to Mexico. I arrived…

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15 Pages
Essay

Children

Bilingualism Including Learning English as

Words: 3904
Length: 15 Pages
Type: Essay

This can be seen with regard to the issue of codeswitching in bilingual children. As Scheu (1999) states, the effects of culture and context are extremely important in bilingualism.…

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2 Pages
Essay

Communication - Language

Bilingualism First and Second Language Acquisition Theorists

Words: 658
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Bilingualism: First and second language acquisition theorists Experience as a bilingual person The term bilingual is used for the individuals that are having a command over more than one communication system. The…

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2 Pages
Essay

Communication - Language

Bilingualism One of the Inevitable

Words: 555
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Children of parents whose native language is not English should begin learning both languages as early as possible, ideally, simultaneously when they first begin to acquire spoken language…

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4 Pages
Research Paper

Languages

Bilingualism and the Advantages of Multilingual Capability

Words: 1079
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Bilingualism The concept of bilingualism is common across the globe in the contemporary society for instance in Europe 56% are known to speak in a language other than their mother…

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12 Pages
Term Paper

Communication - Language

Bilingualism in the U S Bilingualism

Words: 3197
Length: 12 Pages
Type: Term Paper

(Linton) One Turning Point One prominent turning point for the opposition of bilingualism occurred with Peal and Lambert's (1962) study, as after their study, "bilingualism became recognized as having…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Communication - Language

Bilingualism and Language Policy Spanish

Words: 1441
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Bilingual Policies One of the most controversial issues facing today's policy makers in the United States is the issue of bilingualism. The United States currently has a significant minority population…

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4 Pages
Article Critique

Communication - Language

Code Switching and Language Change Arabic English Bilingualism in Australia

Words: 1267
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Article Critique

Cruickshank, K. (2008). Arabic-English bilingualism in Australia. In J. Cummins and N.H. Hornberger (eds), Encyclopedia of Language and Education, 2nd Ed., Vol. 5: Bilingual Education, 281 -- 291. Springer…

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13 Pages
Term Paper

Communication - Language

Childhood Second Language Learning and Subtractive Bilingualism

Words: 3371
Length: 13 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Childhood Second Language Learning and Subtractive ilingualism During the past five decades, the phenomenon of understanding how language is acquired has intrigued historians, theorists and scholars alike. Although language learning…

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10 Pages
Research Paper

Education

Hispanic American Learners Using Additive Bilingualism to Address Subtractive Educational Challenge

Words: 2989
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Using Additive Bilingualism to Address Subtractive Educational Challenge among Hispanic-American LearnersIntroductionLatin Americans largest color population will account for about half of student growth over the next decade. Latin Americans…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Native Americans

Inuktitut Inuit's Language in Modern Inuit Communities in Northern Canada

Words: 3303
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Inuktitut in Modern Inuit Communities in Northern Canada The role of language in identity construction of the Inuit in Nunavik (Quebec, Canada), which nourishes the evolution of their ethno-territorial movement…

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3 Pages
Essay

Race

Official Language Movement Hispanic Cultural Interest the

Words: 816
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Official Language Movement: Hispanic Cultural Interest The focus of this work is the official language movement and bilingualism in education politics in the United States, which is an important…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Children

Edit Advantage of Bilingual Children in Cognition

Words: 580
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Edit Advantage of Bilingual Children in Cognition Psychology 317, Fall 2012 Knowing several languages heightens one's status in society and can widen opportunities in professional and personal arenas. There have been…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Race

Certain Issues Addressed in the Minority Rights Revolution by John D Skrentny

Words: 1172
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Minority Rights Revolution The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s brought about several concordant social changes in the United States. What began as primarily an attempt to liberate African-Americans from…

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