Candide Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Loss Read P 305 Leaving

Words: 7913 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75963209

" The differences in these two lines seem to be only a matter of syntax but in actuality, it also differs in the meaning. The King James Bible version makes it seem like the Lord is making the individual do something, as if by force or obligation, while the Puritan version states that the Lord causes the individual to do something, as if out of their own will. This alone relays the message that faith itself is driving the action, not a perceived obligation.

Another distinction between the two translations can be found with the lines "Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: / and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever" (King James Bible) and "Goodness and mercy surely shall / all my days follow me. / and in the Lord's house I shall / dwell so long as days…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Lesson 3 Journal Entry

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59929217



Do you disagree with any of Pope's opinions or pronouncements in the Heroic Couplets or "An Essay on Man"?

Pope is critical of individuals who "cry, if man's unhappy, God's unjust," suggesting that the unhappiest people are people who blame God, rather than themselves for all of their troubles, or who curse God because their lives are imperfect. The need to accept life's imperfections while still working to enact positive changes within the limitations of humanity is a positive message still relevant for people today.

Based on what you have read of "The Rape of the Lock," what do you think the poem's theme or central message is? What or who are the objects of his satire? Does the epic, "The Rape of the Lock" apply in any way to society today? Identify two passages that could serve as satiric commentaries on people's behavior today. Your answer should discuss both…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Voltaire and Dostoyevsky Dostoyevsky's Notes From Underground

Words: 1513 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78059647

Voltaire and Dostoyevsky

Dostoyevsky's Notes from Underground and Voltaire's Candide are precisely similar works: in attempting to construct a narrative critique of a philosophical system, they slip from harsh satire into a form of sentimentality. I would suggest that comparing the two works' differing approaches to the philosophical problems of optimism, adversity, and violence are indicative of a different attitude altogether toward the philosophical problems presented. Dostoyevsky is passionate but ultimately sees no alternative between traditional religious morality and nihilism; Voltaire, by contrast, sees traditional religious morality as banal and proposes his own alternative. But in my conclusion, I will compare and contrast the role played by comedy in both works -- although each takes a broadly satirical approach toward the philosophical fashions of the present-day, only Candide is the genuinely comic work.

In comparing the role played by optimism in both works, it is important to recall that this…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Enlightenment-Era Neo-Classical Works With Romantic Overtones 'Tartuffe

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55737002

Enlightenment-era, Neo-Classical works with Romantic overtones 'Tartuffe," Candide, and Frankenstein all use unnatural forms of character representation to question the common conceptions of what is natural and of human and environmental 'nature.' Moliere uses highly artificial ways of representing characters in dramatic forms to show the unnatural nature of an older man becoming attracted to a younger woman. Voltaire uses unnatural and absurd situations to question the unnatural belief of Professor Pangloss that this is the best of all possible worlds. Mary Shelley creates a fantastic or unnatural scenario to show the unnatural nature of a human scientist's attempt to turn himself into a kind of God-like creator through the use of reason and science alone.

"Tartuffe" is the most obviously unnatural of the three works in terms of its style. It is a play, and the characters do not really develop as human beings because of the compressed nature…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Plato a Platypus and the Enlightenment

Words: 1482 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47560104

Plato and the Platypus

Philosophers in the Enlightenment era would come up with various new means to popularize ideas. Denis Diderot conceived the first encyclopedia in this period, which was an attempt to systematize all world knowledge in an accessible way. But also, in another innovation, Voltaire would offer as a refutation of the optimistic philosophy of Leibniz -- which held that "this is the best of all possible worlds" -- a new form of philosophical argument: the extended comedy (Cathcart and Klein, 17). Voltaire's short book Candide is essentially an extended refutation of Leibniz's view of God (or perhaps any view of God), but it makes its points through satirical humor. In some sense, Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein are following in the footsteps of Voltaire by attempting to shed light on philosophical ideas through the medium of humor in their work Plato and a Platypus alk Into A…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cathcart, Thomas and Klein, Daniel. Plato and a Platypus Walk Into A Bar: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes. New York: Penguin Books, 2008. Print.
View Full Essay

American Revolution the Pen Is

Words: 2468 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89354896

In the period between the evolution and the drafting of the Constitution, Jefferson noted that the eventual existence of a dictator in place of a king in Ancient ome clearly indicated the existence of real failings within the oman system:

dictator is entirely antithetical to republicanism's "fundamental principle...that the state shall be governed as a commonwealth," that there be majority rule, and no prerogative, no "exercise of [any] powers undefined by the laws." "Powers of governing...in a plurality of hands." (Zuckert, 1996, p. 214)

As a result, Jefferson, like the philosophes before him (and the Iroquois) would turn to ideas that would balance the necessary evils of government power with the rights of the people. James Madison agreed wholeheartedly, and urged in "Government of the United States" that a constitutional government based on separation of powers was the only sure way of preventing the country from taking the "high road…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8969577

Black, E. (1988). Our Constitution: The Myth That Binds Us. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001637570

Brooks, C.K. (1996). Controlling the Metaphor: Language and Self-Definition in Revolutionary America. CLIO, 25(3), 233+.
View Full Essay

Analyzing World War I Dada

Words: 1543 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65341779

World War I: Dada

The literary and artistic movement known as Dada originated in the Swiss city of Zurich, at the time of the First World War, as a response to the War as well as the nationalism considered by many to have sparked the war. Inspired by Futurism, Cubism, Expressionism, Constructivism, and other innovative movements, Dadaism's output ranged from poetry, collage, and painting, to performance arts and sculptures (Jones, 2002; Hulsenbeck, 1988). The movement's aesthetic, characterized by contempt for nationalistic and materialistic attitudes, strongly influenced artists in major cities across the globe, such as Berlin, Paris, Cologne, Hanover, and New York, and all ended up creating their own separate groups. Surrealism led to Dadaism's degeneration.

Beginnings

Sickened by the nationalism that triggered WWI, Dadaists were constantly against the idea of authoritarianism, and all kinds of guiding ideologies or group leadership. Their main concern was revolting against the apparent middleclass…… [Read More]

References

Buskirk, M., & Nixon, M. (1996). The Duchamp Effect. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Elder, B. (2013). Dada, Surrealism, and the Cinematic Effect. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Hulsenbeck, R. (1988). "En avant Dada: A history of Dadaism." In R. Motherwell (Ed.), The Dada painters and poets (pp. 23-48). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Original work published 1920)

Jones, A. (2002). Equivocal Masculinity: New York Dada in the context of World War I. Art History, 25(2), 162.
View Full Essay

William Carey Biography at One

Words: 4876 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47421959

"

Although Carey's journal reportedly ends prematurely, he continued to write letters for the next thirty years.

Carey understood the value in/of education, medicine, and other works. He continually encouraged missionaries to travel to the hinterland "and build an indigenous Christianity with vernacular Bibles and other writings and native-led churches."

For his mission to succeed, hile it simultaneously retained its core, Carey purported, it had to not only fill the eternal needs of people missionaries shared the gospel with, but also their day-to-day needs.

During his day-to-day life, Carey was also a husband and father. The following relates details regarding his three marriages.

Dorothy Plackett Carey (1755?-1807): Married illiam Carey in 1781. She was 25 and he was 19. Their marriage was a contrast in ability and interests. She was reluctant to leave England and go to India. Only after much perusasion and on the condition that her sister, Kitty,…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104231781

Balmer, Randall. Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2004. Book online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104231922.Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.

Barnhill, John H.. "The Journal and Selected Letters of William Carey.(Book Review)," Baptist History and Heritage, January 1, 2001. Available from Highbeam Research, http://www.highbeam.com.Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.

Carey, Eustace. Memoir of William Carey, D.D.: Late Missionary to Bengal.(Jackson and Walford, 1836; Digitized Oct 24, 2006. Available from, http://books.google.com/books?id=_73iSb36t9IC&vq=William+Carey,+missionary&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0.Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.

An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the by William Carey. Produced by Michael Ciesielski, Robert Shimmin and PG Distributed Proofreaders, N.d. Available from, http://www.fullbooks.com/an-Enquiry-into-the-Obligations-of-Christians.html. Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.
View Full Essay

Nonexistent Knight by Italo Calvino 1959

Words: 1167 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61583339

Nonexistent Knight is a character driven narrative and, therefore, should be summarized within the framework of those characters and their exploits throughout the novella. The titular character, the nonexistent knight, Agilulf, who exists not in the flesh but in a suit of armor, seeks to restore his honor by confirming that his good deed that earned him his knighthood, saving the virginity of a young royal woman from the lecherous ways of two brutes, did indeed happen per his recollection. The youth, Raimbaut, is a young knight in the making who falls in love with a dastardly lady knight. The lady knight, Bradamante, falls in love with the chivalric and impeccably noble ways of the nonexistent knight and sets up a love triangle of sorts. Then there's Torrismund, another knight, who ends up falling in love with a woman that was at one point thought to be his mother. Lastly,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Calvino, Italo. The Nonexistent Knight. San Diego, CA: Harcourt, Inc., 1959. Print.

Markey, Constance. Italo Calvino: A Journey toward Postmodernism (Crosscurrents,

Comparative Studies in European Literature and Philosophy). Gainesville, FL:

University Press of Florida; 1st edition,1999. Print.
View Full Essay

Fanny Hill or Memoirs of a Woman

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40856646

Fanny Hill, or Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, written by ohn Cleland in 1749 while in debtor's prison, has been called the first pornographic novel. Cleland demonstrated an artful ability to use the writing style of the day, use of irony, and a superficial story of virtue that triumphs over sin to make pornography acceptable enough to be read widely.

The story is written in an autobiographical tone and consists of letters Fanny Hill writes to a friend. Her story begins at age 15 when she is orphaned. She moves to London, and has to find a way to support herself. The path she takes, of moving into a brothel, may have been a common solution for young women without means or relatives during that time. While she is in the brothel she meets a man called Charles and falls in love with him, but after they have lived…… [Read More]

Journal of Women's History. 12:2.

Ollson, Lena. 2000. Vice in the Service of Virtue: John Cleland's Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure. Lund University. Accessed via the Internet 1/23/03. http://www.lub.lu.se/cgi-bin/show_diss.pl?db=global&fname=hum_111.html.

Supreme Court. 1996. "A Book Named "John Cleland's Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure" v. Attorney General of Massachusetts: APPEAL FROM the SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT of Massachusetts. #368, Supreme Court of the United States. 383 U.S. 413.
View Full Essay

Understanding the Dangers of Man S Exploitation of Space

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91500180

BETTING THE PLANET

Understanding the Issues Raised in "Betting the Planet"

Charles C. Mann introduces his work by going back to thirty years when the first Astronauts, who went to space, managed to take a picture of the Earth. hat the astronauts saw while out there was a healthy shock to them, and the photograph gave them a reminder of the world's natural limits that cannot be escaped. As such, the photograph became part of contemporary life because it beaconed to environmental advocates and a marketing logo for upscale advertisers. However, human beings are missing in the photograph yet they are a vital component in the completion of the equation. This is true because the Homo sapiens are the single species shaping the global landscape who have exercised dominion over the Earth. The argument raised in the statement above is true because it contributed to Charles Mann's article concerning entering…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Mann, Charles. "Betting the Planet" in Menzel, Peter, and Mann, Charles. Material World: A Global Family Portrait. San Francisco, CA: University of California Press, 1994. Print.
View Full Essay

Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Literary Analysis of Phaedra

Words: 1486 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99595022

Racine's Phaedra -- Compared to Blake's "Lamb" and Melville's Billy Budd

As Bernard Grebanier states, Racine's Phaedra speaks "with the violence of life itself" (xiv). If one were to compare the French playwright's most famous female lead to the English-speaking world's most famous male lead (as Grebanier does), it would have to be to Hamlet, whose passionate assessment of life is likewise problematic. Indeed, Phaedra raises many themes, including the importance of origin, innocence, and sin -- themes that may be found in as seemingly disparate works as illiam Blake's "The Lamb" and Herman Melville's Billy Budd. hile Racine's Phaedra is the tale of a woman, torn by a passion that possesses her so cruelly that it destroys not only her life but the lives of others around her -- including the innocent man who is her obsession, Hyppolytus; Blake's poem deals with the triple theme of origin, innocence, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blake, William. "The Lamb." Songs of Innocence and Experience. UK: Oxford

University Press, 1992. Print.

Grebanier, Bernard. Phaedra: An English Acting Version. NY: Barron's Educational

Series, 1958. Print.
View Full Essay

Letter to a Friend Encouraging

Words: 670 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65772397

When the readings are complete you will be able to visualize the world many years ago and the things that happened at that time. The changes in mankind and attitude are also evidenced by reading the literature of the old world.

Cultural differences are also clearly laid out through this course. They are detailed in several of the assigned works and show you how different people lived and how they thought at the time. Whether you want to learn about foods, dance, mindsets, religious faiths or other aspects of other cultures it can all be done through the assigned readings in this course.

The final reason you should take this course is the way it can be applied to today's life. Learning about the Native American understanding of botanical life can provide insight to the use of herbs today. Taking information from the readings and applying them to current life…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Saikaku Pushkin and El Saadawi Is Justice Possible

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45385064

Saikaku, Pushkin and El Saadawi: Is Justice Possible?

The concept of justice, in literature and in life, is a universally cherished yet complex and inherently ambiguous one. All societies have respective, sometimes opposing, ideas about justice. Islamic Sharia law (once enforced in Afghanistan by the Taliban) states that cutting off a hand is apt justice for theft. Western society would consider that act not only unjust but barbaric. Webster's New American Dictionary defines "justice" as (1) "the administration of what is just (as by assigning merited rewards or punishments)"; (2) "the administration of the law; and (3) FAIRNESS; also RIGHTEOUSNESS" (p. 285). By any of those (admittedly Western) definitions, particularly the last one, neither Ihara Saikaku in "The Barrelmaker, Brimful of Love"; Alexander Pushkin in "The Queen of Spades"; nor Nawar El Saadawi in "In Camera" depict justice as feasible within the socially-constructed institutions (e.g., insane asylums; courtrooms; marriage) or…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Descartes' Discourse Method Part IV Descartes Begins

Words: 565 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20637103

Descartes' Discourse Method (Part IV). Descartes begins problem prove existence ends argument proving existence God. Read Discourse Method located http://www.earlymoderntexts.

Swift's "A Modest Proposal"

Jonathan Swift's satirical essay "A Modest Proposal" is meant to stand as criticism regarding how upper class individuals in Ireland had a tendency to harshly discriminate people belonging to lower classes. The fact that the writer provides a very complex description about how the upper classes need to behave is likely to influence most readers in believing that he was actually interested in putting across truthful opinions and that he was really determined to assist wealthy individuals. Moreover, Swift provides a number of calculations with the purpose of having people acknowledge the financial benefits associated with his plans. It is not until the last passages of the essay that readers are probable to understand that it is actually meant to be satirical and that the writer's…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Booth, W.C. (1975). A Rhetoric of Irony. University of Chicago Press.

Smith, F.N. (1990). The Genres of Gulliver's Travels. University of Delaware Press.

Swift, J. (2004). A Modest Proposal and Other Prose. Barnes & Noble Publishing.
View Full Essay

Swift's a Modest Prposal Surprise Ending -

Words: 444 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85953280

SWIFT'S A MODEST PPOSAL

Surprise Ending - Swift

The Surprise Ending in Swift's a Modest Proposal

In his essay A Modest Proposal (1729) Jonathon Swift ironically puts forth the proposition that for the betterment of Irish society, children of the poor, particularly Catholic children, because there was an over abundance, should be slaughtered and eaten. Swift maintains that this practice would solve a number of societal problems. It would decrease the number of Papists who are the principle breeders of the nation, as well as the most dangerous enemies, it would turn a liability of the poor, another mouth to feed, into an asset or a valuable commodity, it would increase the overall wealth of the nation, it would be a boon to business, and it would encourage marriage by rewarding parents with monetary gain. The surprise ending is that swift recommends this practice only for Ireland.

At the time…… [Read More]

References

Moore, A. (2002). A modest proposal- Study guide. teachit.co.uk. May 1, 2013, from  http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/default.htm 

Swift, J. (1729). A modest proposal for preventing the children of poor people from Ireland from becoming a burden on their parents or counrty and for making them benefical to the publick. The Victorian Web. Retrieved May 1, 2013, from http://www.victorianweb.org/previctorian/swift/modest.html
View Full Essay

Swift's Modesty

Words: 979 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83282985

Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" is quite an unusual work of literature, and one which certainly has a surprise ending. The only allusions to the wild solution that the author will offer to the very real problem plaguing the streets of Ireland -- that of the unfortunate beggar children and their mothers of Irish distinction -- is the fact that it is quite obvious that this essay is a satire. All satires create humor around human folly; that which is made laughable time and again throughout this narrative is the lack of concern on the part of the English for the plight of the Irish. It is due to this lack of concern that Swift quite facetiously, and more than a little bit sarcastically, advocates eating the misfortunate children, which is the surprise ending of this essay -- as well as the fact that the author, after advocating this stance,…… [Read More]

References

Swift, J. (1729). "A modest proposal." www.victorianweb.org. Retrieved from http://www.victorianweb.org/previctorian/swift/modest.html