Candide One Of The Most Thesis

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This hypothesis could be supported by the name of the character and the reader could understand that he maintains his innocence despite having seen and experienced the evil which characterizes the real world. The fact that he dedicates himself to gardening also suggest that his awareness regarding the fact that if you want something, the best thing that you can do about it is try to achieve it on your own. Judging this situation from the perspective of the opposition between science and religion, the gesture becomes a symbol for the individual's freedom and force of will. In creating his own personal paradise, Candide demonstrates that he does not need anyone, not even god. His name receives other connotations under these circumstances and we come to understand his purity no longer of ignorance but as a strong and active manifestation of his potential.

Others have suggested that the act of building a garden as a paradisiacal place of escape demonstrates the incapacity to deal with the real world. This may be true,...

...

While he may have been able to deal with the evil in the world he decided not to. From this point-of-view it could be assumed that Voltaire was making a point about the individual's freedom and power to decide for himself.
The fact that Candide was unhappy as a rich man in Eldorado suggests that happiness has little or nothing to do with material richness. On the contrary happiness is to be linked to spiritual values. The garden which Candide means to construct, besides being a personal oasis is also the result of a process of creation, therefore demonstrating once again the power of the human being.

Bibliography:

Voltaire, Candide or optimism- a new translation, backgrounds, criticism- a Norton critical edition (translated by Robert M. Adams), W.W Norton and co., 1966

Voltaire, Candide or optimism (translated by Cuffe, Theo, introduction by Wood, Michael), Penguin classics, Deluxe edition, 2005

Voltaire, Candide or optimism ( analyzed by professor Raffel, Burton), Yale uNiversity Press, 2006

Bernstein, Leonard, Candide, It's the best of all possible worlds!

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography:

Voltaire, Candide or optimism- a new translation, backgrounds, criticism- a Norton critical edition (translated by Robert M. Adams), W.W Norton and co., 1966

Voltaire, Candide or optimism (translated by Cuffe, Theo, introduction by Wood, Michael), Penguin classics, Deluxe edition, 2005

Voltaire, Candide or optimism ( analyzed by professor Raffel, Burton), Yale uNiversity Press, 2006

Bernstein, Leonard, Candide, It's the best of all possible worlds!


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