Clinical Practice Essays (Examples)

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Applying and Sharing Clinical Evidence

Words: 612 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62810618

Question 1
In contemporary times, there has been an increase in the development and advancement of technology for utilization in clinical practice. I would apply the evidence found in the article by Pals et al. (2015). As a physician in healthcare I would ensure that the patients I provide healthcare to are able to comprehend the new form of technology being used. This would take into account being able to properly communicate and interpret to the patient the importance and benefits to the clients. As outlined by Pals et al. (2015), health professionals as well as patients may deem and perceive new technologies as beneficial components facilitating both patients as well as health professionals in making decisions within the clinical practice. Nonetheless, it is noted that such professionals consider it challenging to assimilate such technology into their clinical work practices, and more so if there is a disparity between the…… [Read More]

References

Pals, R. A., Hansen, U. M., Johansen, C. B., Hansen, C. S., Jørgensen, M. E., Fleischer, J., & Willaing, I. (2015). Making sense of a new technology in clinical practice: a qualitative study of patient and physician perspectives. BMC health services research, 15(1), 402.


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EBP initiatives and Research

Words: 399 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26366243

Research and EBP initiatives
Change in practice depends on the environment in which practice has to take place along with the strength and nature of the research evidence. It also relies on the method by which the process in being carried out. No emphasis has been laid on the effect of cultural factors or existing workplace environment in the original EBP models (Kueny, Mackin & Titler, 2015).
It can be made sure that the appropriate audience receives information about research and EBP initiatives by process of knowledge translation. The process which involves the formation, circulation and adoption of research knowledge into clinical practice is known as knowledge translation. This term has different names around the globe. For instance, in UK and Europe analogous processes are known as research utilization. Researchers in USA know these processes as research diffusion, knowledge uptake and research dissemination. Knowledge-to-action and knowledge translation are common terms…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, K., Margaret, F., Shaban, R., Considine, J. (2016). Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(5-6), 862-872. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jocn.13586

Kueny, A., Shever, L., Mackin, M., & Titler, M. (2015). Facilitating the implementation of evidence-based practice through contextual support and nursing leadership. Journal of Healthcare Leadership, 7. doi: 10.2147/JHL.S45077

 


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Clinical Supervision the Distribution of

Words: 1498 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19403960

Clinical supervision provides a mechanism of data collection and the information reclamation in support to the recent projects and the programmatic developments.

Management of the high number of complex mental health caseloads

These implementations occur under the influence of the Workplace Implementation Committees (WIC) that were established to the oversee agreement by the CMS at the local levels. The CMS is supposed to accompany the implementation of the policies that clearly outline the expectations and responsibilities based on periods and review methods (Cogan 1972). The implementations are expected to be transparent in the process of the WIC members and the staff groups. This includes the clear articulate mechanism for regular workload assessment, management and review.

I. egularly collect the workload from all the executives to make the caseload management process easier.

II. Use the caseload information to make the staff allocation of the resources while measuring their performances.

The workforce…… [Read More]

References

Cogan, M.L. (1972). Clinical supervision. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management., & National Institute of Education (U.S.). (1984). Clinical supervision. Eugene, or: ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, College of Education, University of Oregon.

Powell, D.J. (1980). Clinical supervision: [1]. New York: Human Science Pr.

Bernard, J.M., & Goodyear, R.K. (1998). Fundamentals of clinical supervision. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Clinical Supervision the Subject Supervisor

Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64456789

In certain countries, an effective supervisor possesses basic teaching skills, facilitation skills, negotiation and assertiveness skills, counseling and appraisal skills, mentoring skills, and knowledge of learning resources and certification requirements (Kilminster).

The most important aspect of the role of an effective supervisor is giving supervisee responsibility and the opportunity to practice it (Kilminster, 2000). Supervisees come to view the supervisor as a colleague and this leads them to become self-directed. Some supervisees consider teaching skills and techniques, interpersonal style and professional competence the most important characteristics of an effective supervisor. An effective supervisor shows empathy, is supportive, and exhibits flexibility, instruction, knowledge, interest in supervision and good tracking of supervisees. He is interpretative, respectful, focused ad practical. In contrast, an ineffective supervisor is rigid, shows little empathy and provides low support. He fails to consistently track supervisee concerns, teach or instruct. He is indirect and intolerant. He is close-minded. He…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Borders, L.D. (1994). The good supervisor. ERIC Digests: ERIC Clearinghouse on Counseling and Student Services. Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from http://www.ericdigest.org/1995-1/good.htm

Joslin, v. (2008). Ten traits of a good supervisor. Associated Content: Yahoo. Inc. Shine.

Retrieved on October 28, 2011 from http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/969660/ten_traits_of_a_good_supervisor.html

Kilminster, S.M. (2000). Effective supervision in clinical practice settings. Vol 34
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Clinical Assessment of Learners Clinical Assessment Involves

Words: 2688 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35872340

Clinical Assessment of Learners

Clinical assessment involves the evaluation of technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, knowledge base, and teaching skills, where applicable, of students who are about to enter independent practice. Technological changes have made it possible to assess clinical performance in ways that are far more advanced than pencil and paper tests relied on in the past (Dauphinee, 1995). In the late 1970s, clinical training programs utilized continuous practical assessments to evaluate learner competencies and as means of providing formative assessment feedback. These continuous practical assessments were considered to be "a much more valid, reliable, and realistic method of assessment" (Quinn, 1989). As clinical placements grew shorter and the number of staff, including those with "supernumerary status" grew larger, the quality of continuous practical assessments was substantively impaired (Girot, 1993). The goal of assessment has always been to identify a "competent practitioner" and to support the educational efforts required…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, M. And Chilton, F. (2000) Student and mentor perceptions of mentoring effectiveness, Nurse Education Today, 20 (7), 555-562.

Atkins, S. And Williams, A. (1995) Registered nurses' experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21, 1006-1015.

Cahill, H.A. (1996) A qualitative analysis of student nurses' experiences of mentorship,

Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24(4), 791-799.
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Clinical Theory Practice of the

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13460142



Concisely, Comfort results when an individual keeps of negative or unhealthy living and sticks to positive and healthy living. Comfort has been associated with positive institutional outcomes that include patient satisfaction. The outcome of Comfort is therefore one of the most important indicator of measuring success in nursing practice particularly for patients and families going through some tough or stressful healthcare conditions.

Benefits of the Comfort theory to the Clinical Nurses of the 21st Century

Comfort theory is an important theory that is applicable to the 21st Century clinical practice because of its many inherent benefits or advantages. This theory defines the working environment for healthcare practitioners while at the same time it charts the direction for improving the services offered by the clinical nurses. The universality of the language and concepts used in presenting the theory also promotes its wide acceptance. The simplicity of the tenets of the Comfort…… [Read More]

References

Kolcaba, K. (2003) Comfort Theory and Practice: A Vision for Holistic Health Care and Kolcaba, K.Y. (1994). A theory of holistic Comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(6), 1178-1184.

Kolcaba, K., & DiMarco, M.A. (2005). Comfort Theory and its application to pediatric nursing. Pediatric Nursing. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Magyrary, D. (2002) Positive mental health: a turn of the century perspective. Issues of Mental Health Nursing, 23, 331-349

Malinowski, a., & Stamler, L.L. (2002). Comfort: exploration of the concept in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 39(6), 599-606.
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Clinical Disorder Clinical Psychology and

Words: 3626 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49707748

This leaves many veterans prone to the condition known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This may be characterized as "an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat." (NIMH, 1) in the particular case of this discussion, military combat is a cause of PTSD that can have devastating long-term outcomes. Indeed, "studies estimate that as many as 500,000 troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan will suffer from some form of psychological injury, with PTSD being the most common." (Eliscu, 58) the outcomes of this condition will run a wide range of symptoms that impact the ability of individuals to cope with the pressures of everyday life, to relate to those who have not experienced the traumas of war,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Blanco, C.; Laje, G.; Olfson, Marcus, S.C. & Pincus, H.A. (2002). Trends in the treatment of bipolar disorder by outpatient psychiatrists. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 159(6), 1005-1011.

Craddock, N.; O'Donovan, M.C. & Owen, M.J. (2005). The genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: dissecting psychosis. Journal of Medical Genetics, 42, 193-204.

Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)1. (2006). Anorexia Nervosa. Women's Health.gov

Ellenberger, H. (1970). Discovery of the Unconscious. New York: Basic Books.
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Clinical Supervision Is a Phenomenon

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18640378

In clinical situations, for example, problem-solving techniques are often required to ensure best practice. According to Lyth, some authors argue that a balance between roles should be maintained in order to optimize both clinical practice and theoretical knowledge.

Generally, it appears to be agreed among theorists that the focus of clinical supervision should be professional development and self-actualization. In addition, an inter-disciplinary approach to supervisory practice will also provide a platform for emerging best practice among the various professions, and ultimately benefit the practice in nursing. Although it appears that the theory on clinical supervision is often arbitrary and little researched, it is also true that the phenomenon has been in effect of many years, decades, and even centuries. For midwives, for example, supervision has been part of their profession since 1902, being a statutory requirement.

One problem with clinical supervision, according to Lyth (2000, p. 276), is the fact…… [Read More]

References

Lyth, Gordon M. (2000). Clinical supervision: a concept analysis. Jounral of Advanced Nursing, Vol 31, No. 3.

Macdonald, Joanna. (2002, Feb). Clinical Supervision: a review of underlying concepts and developments. Australian and New Aealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 35, Iss 1. Retrieved from http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a772090191

McLean, Duncan (1996). Clinical Supervision. Psychiatric Bulletin, Vol. 20. Retrieved from http://pb.rcpsych.org/cgi/reprint/20/1/1.pdf

Todd, C. & O'Connor, J. (2005). Clinical Supervision. In N. Skinner, a.M. Roche, J. O'Connor, Y. Pollard, & C. Todd (Eds.), Workforce Development TIPS (Theory Into Practice Strategies): A Resource Kit for the Alcohol and Other Drugs Field. National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Retrieved from  http://www.unodc.org/ddt-training/treatment/VOLUME%20D/Topic%202/8.Workforce%20Development%20TIPS.pdf
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Clinical Nursing Practice for a

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19771195

27).

The proficient nurses perceive situations as wholes rather than in terms of distinct aspects, and performance is determined by maxims. Perceive or perception is the main word: The perspective is not thought out but presents itself based on experience and earlier events. Proficient nurses understand a situation because they perceive its meaning in regard to long-term goals. Because of their experience, proficient nurses can recognize when the expected normal picture does not materialize, which can considerably improve decision making (Benner, 1984, p. 27-29.)

Lastly, the expert performers do not have to count on an analytic principle, such as a rule, guideline or maxim, to connect their understanding of a situation to an appropriate action. Because of their strong background with an intuitive grasp of situations, they can zero in on the accurate region of the problem without trying unfruitful alternative solutions.

Benner's model of skill acquisition is based on…… [Read More]

Communicability: It is almost impossible for intuitive models to communicate something that is intangible and which the practitioner is unable to express. Given that Benner's model relies on experimental knowledge as the basis of "knowing" as opposed to the science of communicable research, it is difficult to think of a situation where nursing's knowledge base becomes a shared resource open equally to all practitioners.

Similarly, systematic-rational models may promote communicability, but the process itself may not be that relevant if it does not fit with reality of clinical practice (Thompson, 1999, p.1225).

Simplification: If the information processing model does not capture all variables in decision making and clinical diagnosis, and also communicating this incomplete picture to other practitioners in the form of scientific evidence, then nursing's knowledge base will continue to develop in an ad hoc manner with major holes in the complete picture. The intuitive model at least permits the complexity of decisions akin to healthcare provision and sees that health is more than the sum of its parts. Also,
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Clinical Psychology Psyd vs PhD

Words: 1116 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66668706

Thus, PysD programs prove beneficial in terms of professional expectations.

This more practice-orientated path goes beyond research. PsyD programs offer a "Comprehensive, carefully supervised training for practice and thorough training for research cannot both be accomplished in the time allowed," (Walfish & Hess 2001:54).

Preparation for the student within a PsyD program comes from actual practice, rather than simple observation. It is within this scope of practice which allows for more thorough preparation for clinical practice. According to the research, "The PsyD students were to have class work as rigorous as that of their fellow students who were working for a PhD, but instead of doing research-based dissertations, they spent more time in practicum work and submitted a final document focusing more on a clinical demonstration project instead," (Walfish & Hess 2001:48). Students are allowed to go beyond the classroom and experience the reality of clinical practice within a psychology…… [Read More]

References

Johnson, W. Brad & Mcminn, Mark R. (2003). Thirty years of integrative Doctoral training: historic developments, assessment of outcomes, and recommendations for the future. Journal of Psychology and Theology. 31(2):83-86.

Keith-Spiegel, Patricia & Wiederman, Michael W. (2000). The Complete Guide to Graduate School Admission: Psychology, Counseling, and Related Professions. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Walfish, Steven & Hess, Allen K. (2001). Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Clinical Auditing and Governance

Words: 2506 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14301156

Clinical Governance and Auditing

Throughout this paper, an attempt has been made to demonstrate an understanding of the procedure of Clinical Audit (CA). The focus of this CA is the high risk area of patient safety, and with regard to how this is linked to patient safety, hand hygiene has been selected. The findings and the recommendations that follow combined with the CA tool and the selection criteria will be outlined in form of a Clinical Audit. For the purposes of improving clinical practice, CAs forms an integral aspect of clinical governance. It is indeed notable that CAs encapsulates practice which through analysis can result to quality enhancement, particularly for the patients. Various definitions of the term which are invariably the same and which tend towards verbosity exist, but a terse and precise definition is given by Coffey (2009) who puts forth that a CA is a systematic evaluation of…… [Read More]

References

Hart T. (2013).Promoting hand hygiene in clinical practice. Nursing Times; 109: 38, 14-15.

Tollefson, J. (2011). Clinical skills for enrolled/division 2 nurses. South Melbourne, Vic, Cengage Learning.

Scott, H.R., Blyth, K.G., & Jones, J.B. (2009).Davidson's Foundations of Clinical Practice. London, Elsevier Health Sciences UK..

Wilson, J. (2006). Infection control in clinical practice. Edinburgh, Elsevier, Baillie're Tindall.
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Practice Extrapolate Strategies Propose Close Theory-Practice Gap

Words: 1396 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80430929

Practice

Extrapolate strategies propose close theory-practice gap nursing. Must 3 specific articles 2 choosing a total 5 references. This master's degree Nursing Theory Course. The paper 3-5 pages length APA format.

The theory-practice gap in nursing:

Different perspectives and strategies to close the 'gap'

According to many nurses, there exists a "gap between nursing theory and practice. In order to improve the integration of theory and practice, a high standard of clinical practice is necessary" so that nursing students can see the relevance of what they learn in the classroom to the field (Ming-Tien & Ling-Long 2004). ona Levin writes that one important step in closing the theory-practice gap in nursing education is taking a constructivist approach to nursing education. "Within the constructivist theory, the learner is able to gain meaning from past and current learning experiences. This experience assists the learner to construct new knowledge…The constructivist facilitates experiential learning…… [Read More]

References

Levin, Rona F. (2010). Integrating evidence-based practice with educational theory in clinical

practice for nurse practitioners: Bridging the theory -practice gap. Research and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International Journal, 24 (4): 213-216.

Levy-Malmberg, R., Eriksson, K.K., & Lindholm, L.L. (2008). Caritas -- caring as an ethical conduct. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 22(4), 662-667.

Ming-Tien Tsai, & Ling-Long Tsai. (2004). Critical success factors of transferring nursing knowledge in hospital's clinical practice. Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge, 5(1), 193-197
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Clinical Education the Objective of This Study

Words: 2827 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72250556

Clinical Education

The objective of this study is to conduct a critical analysis of issues in clinical education. Toward this end, this study will conduct a review of literature in this area of inquiry.

The work of Strohschein, Hagler and May (2002) entitled 'Assessing the Need for Changes in Clinical Education Practice' reports a study that identifies areas of need within clinical education and well as describing "…various models and tools that are proposed and utilized in clinical education, as well as the exploration of the extent to which these models and tools might meet the identified needs of the clinical education process in physical therapy." (p.1) Physical therapists are reported as working in a health care climate "of increasing complexity and rapid change, of fiscal restraint and demands for accountability, of scrutiny from both internal and external sources. In such a climate, the ability to respond appropriately to these…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cross V. (1997) The professional development diary: a case study of one cohort of physiotherapy students. Physiotherapy.1997; 83:375 -- 383.

Hagler P, McFarlane L. (1991) Achieving maximum student potential: the supervisor as coach. Canadian Journal of Rehabilitation.1991; 5:5 -- 16.

Hayes KW, Huber G, Rogers J, Sanders B. (1999) Behaviors that cause clinical instructors to question the clinical competence of physical therapist students. Phys Ther.1999; 79:653 -- 667.

Higgs J, Glendinning M, Dunsford F, Panter J. Goals and components of clinical education in the allied health professions. In: Proceedings of the 11th International Congress of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy, London.1991: 305 -- 307.
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Clinical Educators Who Prepare the Students for

Words: 1668 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50509508

Clinical educators who prepare the students for enhancing knowledge and skills. They typically build the competent and provide quality clinical education. Many universities are offering these types of programmes to help students and prepare them for professional development of clinical educators. The educators develop themselves and their company for prospect healthcare challenges, this primarily help them in achieving their targets, and fulfill organization's need. It broad the horizon of student and give them inspiration to move ahead. We will also discuss the self-assessment criteria and other components of clinical education.

Goals of each workshop

In general the goal of each workshop was to learn, explore, and develop the phenomena of self-awareness. In the first module we have learned about the basic techniques of manipulating an optimal learning environment. The second module has demonstrated the abilities of learners to corroborate multiple skills throughout the framework to maximize value for patient care…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benner, P, Sutphen, M., Leonard, V., & Day, L. (2010).Educating nurses. A call for tramsformation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Benner, P. (1984). From novice to expert: Excellent and power in clinical nursing practice. Menlo Park, Calif: Addison-Wesley

Bransford, J. (2000). How people learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Research Council

Chabel, MM. (2001). A model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education.
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Clinical Psychology the Field of Clinical Psychology

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19328472

Clinical Psychology

The field of clinical psychology emerged as a viable method through which the theoretical foundations of cognitive studies could be effectively applied within the clinical setting to prevent and treat psychological syndromes. Derived from the first clinical psychology work conducted by Lightner Witmer in the late 19th century, and expanding throughout the 20th century as diagnostic tools were refined and classification systems for mental disorders were standardized, modern clinical psychology has been adapted to fulfill a niche within a whole host of divergent fields, including criminal justice, the social sciences and gender relations. Clinical psychologists premise their work on the use of empirical analysis to accurately investigate matters of cognitive processing, psychological assessment and mental illness, with the administration of personality tests, neurological scans and clinical interviews the most frequently utilized diagnostic resources. As clinical psychology expanded the base of knowledge pertaining to the human brain's highly refined…… [Read More]

References

Blackburn, R. (1993). The psychology of criminal conduct: Theory, research and practice. John Wiley & Sons.

Donohue, J., & Levitt, S. (2001). The impact of race on policing and arrests. Journal of Law and Economics, 44, 367-394. Retrieved from  http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittDonohueTheImpactOfRace2001.pdf 

Fite, P.J., Wynn, P., & Pardini, D.A. (2009). Explaining discrepancies in arrest rates between

Black and White male juveniles. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 77(5), 916. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2981137/ >.
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Clinical Nurse Specialist's Practice-Specific Concepts

Words: 1769 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82480141

Practice-Specific Concepts

The nursing practice is a profession that is based on conceptual and theoretical models that help in guiding patient safety and quality initiatives. The use of conceptual and theoretical models is an important part in nursing practice that is applied across the various disciplines in this profession. As a clinical nurse specialist, nursing conceptual and theoretical models play a crucial role in achieving the specific goal of identifying, recognizing, treating, and monitoring illnesses or diseases. The process of using nursing conceptual and theoretical models involves developing practice-specific concepts relating to the specific professional practice and creating a personal philosophy and practice guideline. The practice-specific concepts should incorporate the four basic metaparadigms of nursing theory and be supported by research and concepts.

Overview of My Professional Practice and Four Metaparadigms

A clinical nurse specialist is a nurse professional or practitioner who provides a crucial link with regards to detecting,…… [Read More]

References

"Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice." (n.d.). American Nurses Association. Retrieved April

18, 2015, from http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/Policy-Advocacy/Positions-and-Resolutions/ANAPositionStatements/Position-Statements-Alphabetically/prtetcldv14444.html

Lyon, B.L. & Davidson, S.B. (2004). Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education. Retrieved April 18, 2015, from  http://www.nacns.org/docs/NACNS-Statement.pdf 

Masters, K. (2014). Framework for Professional Nursing Practice. In Role development in professional nursing practice (3rd ed., Chapter 2, pp.47-87). Retrieved from  http://samples.jbpub.com/9781449691509/81982_CH02_Pass1.pdf
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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Clinical Staging of Psychiatric Disorders

Words: 1272 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74939890

DSM diagnostic criteria have long been a source of criticism. McGorry, Hickie, Yung, Pantelis, and Jackson (2006) point out some basic deficiencies of the DSM diagnostic system. First the authors state that the function of a diagnosis is to state what treatment should be applied or predict the prognosis of the condition. These are certainly functions of a diagnosis, but a diagnosis has broader implications. First and foremost the idea of having a diagnosis is to take a series of related signs and symptoms that hang together consistently and label them so as to facilitate communication between health care professionals. A diagnosis alone is useless unless it allows professionals to communicate about the same entity. Then descriptions of course, treatment, and prognosis can follow.

McGorry et al. charge that in the DSM system the clinical features that occur early in the course of the disorder are not distinguished from those…… [Read More]

References

Fava G.A. & Kellner, R. (1993). Staging: a neglected dimension in psychiatric classification. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 87, 555-558.

Fava, G.A. & Tossani, E. (2007). Prodromal stage of major depression. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 1, 9-18.

Hetrick, S.E., Parker, A.G., Hickie, I.B., Purcell, R., Yung, A.R., & McGorry, P.D. (2008).

Early identification and intervention in depressive disorders: Towards a clinical staging model. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 77, 263-270.
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Using Formal Guidelines to Establish Nursing Practice

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82167280

Clinical Guidelines

The methods used to assess the quality and strength of the evidence by the National Guidelines Clearinghouse include expert consensus (alone and through committee and/or Delphi methods), subjective review, and weighting according to a rating scheme (in which the scheme may be give or not given). The methods use to collect and/or select the evidence that will be evaluated include the following: Hand-searches of published literature (primary sources and secondary sources), searches of electronic databases, and searches of patient registry data. The methods used to create, formulate, or establish the recommendations include: Informal expert consensus, expert consensus (alone, and through Delphi methods, nominal group technique, and/or consensus development conference), and balance sheets.

The guidelines comparisons of the National Guidelines Clearinghouse indicate that the rating schemes for the strength of the recommendations are derived from the weighted scheme used the developer of the guideline. These rating schemes are used…… [Read More]

References

National Institute for Health and clinical Excellence (NICE). (2012, March). Infection. Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care. London (UK): National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Clinical guideline no. 139).

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2010). Report: Systems to Rate the Strength of Scientific Evidence.

Woolf, S., Schunemann, H.J., Eccles, M.P., Grimshaw, J.M., & Shekelle, P. (2012). Developing clinical practice guidelines: Types of evidence and outcomes; values and economics, synthesis, grading, and presentation and deriving recommendations. Implementation Science, 7(61). DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-7-61. Retrieved from http://www.implementationscience.com/content/7/1/61
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Clinical Psychology Why I Chose Clinical Psychology

Words: 1220 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70016750

Clinical Psychology

Why I Chose Clinical Psychology as a Profession

Clinical psychology was not an immediately clear academic or career path for me, not that it was unappealing in any regard but simply that it took some time to come to my attention as an area of focus that was particularly interesting. Studying psychology as an undergraduate definitely piqued my curiosity and engaged a passion for application and interpersonal engagement with what I had learned and had started to experience, yet it still took several years following my undergraduate studies for me to develop a true understanding of what clinical psychology involved as both an academic and a practical/professional discipline. Several more years of semi-professional inquiry found me increasingly drawn to clinical psychology largely because I enjoyed the challenges presented in terms of interpersonal skills and especially in terms of the mental puzzles one was routinely confronted with in anything…… [Read More]

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Clinical Supervision and Peer Coaching

Words: 1337 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9359107



Clinical Supervision and its Strengths and eaknesses

Annie Pettifer and colleague Lynn Clouder explain in the peer-reviewed journal Learning in Health and Social Care that clinical supervision is commonly used in professional contexts as a way to "guide reflection with the purpose of advancing practice" (Pettifer, 2008, 169). Clinical supervision "…enables critical practice and development of personal knowledge, professional expertise and competence" (Pettifer, 169).

Pettifer mentions that there is no hard and fast rule as to how the clinical supervision model should be presented. There are many interpretations, the author explains, and there is "conceptual ambiguity" as well; but the ambiguity can be explained because there can be no single model that meets all the professional needs of principals. But that said, there is a basic definition of clinical supervision that is presented by the authors:

"…[clinical supervision] is a formal process of support and learning which enables individual practitioners…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gibble, J.L., and Lawrence, J.D. (1987). Peer Coaching for Principals. Educational Leadership.

Huston, T., and Weaver, C.L. (2008). Peer Coaching: Professional Development for Experienced Faculty. Innovations in Higher Education, Vol. 33, 5-20.

Pettifer, A., and Clouder, L. (2008). Clinical supervision: a means of promoting reciprocity between practitioners and academics. Learning in Health and Social Care, 7(3), 168-177.

Pfeifer, D. (2011). Transforming Staff through Clinical Supervision. Reclaiming Journal,
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Clinical Decision Making Guide Subjective

Words: 1292 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20564934

A level of 126 mg/dL or above, confirmed by repeating the test on another day, means that you have diabetes.

An oral glucose tolerance test measures your blood glucose after you have gone at least 8 hours without eating and 2 hours after you drink a glucose-containing beverage. This test can be used to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. OGTT is more sensitive than the FPG test for diagnosing pre-diabetes, but it is less convenient to administer. The OGTT requires you to fast for at least 8 hours before the test. Your plasma glucose is measured immediately before and 2 hours after you drink a liquid containing 75 grams of glucose dissolved in water.

If your blood glucose level is between 140 and 199 mg/dL 2 hours after drinking the liquid, you have a form of pre-diabetes called impaired glucose tolerance or IGT, meaning that you are more likely to develop…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Braunald, Eugene., Fauci, Anthony S., Kasper, Dennis L., Hauser, Stephen L., Longo, Dan L., Jameson, J. Larry. 2001. Harrison's Principle of Internal Medicine, 15th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing Division.

The Merck Manual (16th ed.). (1995). Portland, Oregon: Merck & Co., Inc.
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Clinical Residency for a Family

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80369850

According to the AACN's report, "Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health" (2002), "Competencies are the domain or body of knowledge and skills that essentially define a profession or discipline. This domain of competencies guides training programs, provides expectations for employers, and drives the nature of assessment instruments and performance standards for credentialing institutions, certifying agencies, and accrediting organizations" (p. 14).

The core competencies for nurse practitioner graduates are intended to help candidates used what they have already learned and require a graduate-level education in order to attain certification as an APN and the AACN has developed this graduate curriculum as the basis for advanced practice nursing. As described by AACN, advanced practice nursing preparation includes ". . . graduate nursing core content (e.g., research, health policy, ethics, and more) and advanced nursing practice content (e.g., advanced health assessment, advanced physiology and…… [Read More]

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Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse

Words: 2026 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59055950



Since modern medicine can sustain patients with proper medical follow-up for years, it becomes incumbent on the profession to follow the patients and provide them with the knowledge and tracking to insure that they are observing the procedures and medications which prolong their quality of life. Given hospitals' short-term orientation with the patients, there is a need to bridge patient care before, during and after acute-care visits.

While there are some nursing specialties which can be regarded as solely hospital- or community-based, many of the specialties call for a more holistic notion of patient care. y combining the CNS and NP specialties, this profession has a better chance of assuring better patient outcomes, and a better quality of life for the patient.

ibliography

ennett, .J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

erger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennett, B.J. (1998). Psychiatric mental health nursing: thriving in a changing environment through outcomes-based measurements. Semin. Nurse Manage., 144-148.

Berger, a.M.-F. (1996). Advanced practice roles for nurses in tomorrow's healthcare systems. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 250-255.

Chaska, N.L. (2001). The Nursing Profession Tomorrow and Beyond. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Cukr, P.L. (1997). The psychiatric clinical nurse specialist/nurse practitioner: an example of a combined role. Arch Psychiatr Nurs, 2-12.
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Clinical Learning

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15848913

Clinical Learning Outcomes

Interaction of Variables.

Evaluating clinical learning outcomes

Describe the skill and the learner you intend to teach and evaluate

Because of cutbacks in the number of days new patients are allotted to spend in the hospital, patients and their families are increasingly responsible for more of the patient's care, even immediately following a diagnosis of a serious illness such as type I, or juvenile, insulin-dependent diabetes. Teaching patients to correctly monitor their blood sugar and self-administer insulin is essential, but it requires a high level of patient compliance and willingness to learn. It is essential that young patients and their parents have a thorough understanding of the process.

Briefly describe how you would design the learning experience

Learning is a step-by-step process. It is important not to bombard patients with knowledge right away, when they are still frightened and confused. Also, although there are real risks with…… [Read More]

References

Hahn, K.K. (1990). Teaching patients to administer insulin. Nursing, 20(4), 70-70.

Retrieved:  http://search.proquest.com/docview/79701645?accountid=10901 

Silvestrone, J.M. (2004). Performance-based assessment: Improving the value of laboratory and skills examinations. New Directions for Teaching & Learning, 100, 65 -- 71.
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Clinical Risk Management Hospitals Are One of

Words: 1817 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67417286

Clinical isk Management

Hospitals are one of the top listed high-risk places of work. Just like any high-risk workplaces, Clinical isk Management (CM) procedures are formulated to enable hospitals in identifying, containing, as well as manage work related risks such as injuries, which are bound within the facilities. Implementation of element contained in risk management procedures in any hospital setting should be effected in order to ensure for the safety of both patients and workers accommodated in the facility.

isk Management

isk management is highly prioritized in most high-risk organizations. Technological advances have been realized in modern medicine progressively resulting to more complex care and treatment processes. Despite the positive result of leveraging care opportunities, such advancements may result in adversities that might in turn affect patients and staff working in hospital environments. Since it is far from possible to eradicate such risks completely, clinical risk management procedures are there…… [Read More]

References

Elizabeth, A. H and Betty, J.H. (1976). The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 76, No. 6, pp. 924 -- 927: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Publishers.

Stanbury, M. S and Anderson, H.A. (2000). Guidelines; Minimum and Comprehensive State-Based Activities in Occupational Safety and Health: DHHS (NIOSH) publication No. 95 -- 107.

Stanbury, M.J. And Goldoft, M. Use of OSHA Inspection Data for Fatal Occupational Injury Surveillance in New Jersey. Am J. Public Health 1990; 80: 200-202.

Tepper, A. (2000). Surveillance of Occupational Illnesses, Injuries, and Hazards in New Jersey. NJDOH.
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Clinical Psychology Approaches of the

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72560358



In contrast to dynamic or behavioral models, humanistic therapy places the patient (or "client") in the center of the session. This often relegates the therapist to a coaching role or, even more passively, to serve as an example of sincere interest in the client's chosen direction. Since the goal is often to build self-esteem (Branden, 1994, p. 1), this gives the client (for example, a timid child or neglected widow) experience with supportive, open relationships that may have been absent from prior life.

With its roots in intervention-oriented social work, family systems therapy has evolved into a sophisticated theoretical approach in its own right. By seeking the source of disturbances in the relationships between family members and other individuals, family therapists often derive insight from studying how two or more people -- any one of whom may be the putative "patient" (Barnhill, 1979, p. 94) -- transmit information and emotional…… [Read More]

References

Aveline, M. (2001). Very brief dynamic psychotherapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 7, pp. 373-380.

Barnhill, L.R. (1979). Healthy family systems. The Family Coordinator, 28(1), pp. 94-100.

Bateman, a., Brown, D. & Pedder, J. (2000). Introduction to psychotherapy: An outline of psychodynamic principles and practice. 3rd edition. New York: Brunner-Routledge.

Branden, N. Working with self-esteem in psychotherapy. Directions in Clinical Psychology, 4(8), pp. 1-6.
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Clinical Nurse Leader Cnl Is a Relatively

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11708062

Clinical nurse leader (CNL) is a relatively new designation in the nursing profession. It is designed to take nurses that are already highly skilled and help them focus on safety and quality outcomes for their patient populations (American, 2013). In order to be a CNL, one must be a registered nurse and have a Master's Degree in the Science of Nursing (American, 2013). Additionally, the nurse must complete advanced coursework. This includes classes in pharmacology, pathophysiology, and clinical assessment (American, 2013). Those who work as CNLs have a very important job in that they oversee the coordination of patient care, develop strategies to improve quality, and assess any health risks that have to be dealt with (Institute, 2000). They also must focus on communication among their nursing team and solutions to problems that are evidence-based and created for their particular unit (Institute, 2001). To become certified as a CNL, one…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2013) Competencies and curricular expectations for clinical nurse leader education and practice. White Paper.

Institute of Medicine. (2000). To err is human: Building a safer health system. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. (2001). Crossing the quality chasm. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. (2003). Health professions education: A bridge to quality. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
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Clinical Psychology Many People E G Researchers Graduate

Words: 358 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17381539

Clinical Psychology

Many people (e.g., researchers, graduate students) can benefited from compulsive traits. What are some likely personality characteristics of such persons? What would such people NOT be like?

Compulsive individuals are likely also to be anxious, competent, deliberative, goal oriented, and dutiful.

Define "personality" and "trait."

Personality is enduring, creating the cohesive self that we recognize when we look inward. It comprises a number of different mechanisms and properties. One's personality mediates that individual's interactions with every level of the environment from internal to dyadic to social and cultural. A trait is a distinguishing feature and personality comprises all of an individual's traits.

According to Kuyken et al. (2003) what predicts worse psychological adaptation over the course of training for clinical psychology students? What predicts better adjustment over time?

Kuyken et al. (2003) found that trainees who felt that demands on them were reasonable, who reported having a good…… [Read More]

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Clinical Goal Course

Words: 522 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45174906

Clinical Goals

During this health assessment class I aim to close the gaps I currently have when considering experience in realistic clinical situations. An activity such as having to perform CPR on a patient can represent an important factor in making it possible for a student to gain a complex understanding of the domain. The class is going to provide me with the opportunity to assess the way that concepts such as cultural values, health notions, and caring practices performed in a particular institution work together in assisting people in need of health care.

I would apply theory in cases when laboratory results are either inconclusive or they are abnormal. This would mean that I would have to find a way to determine why these respective results are in this condition and get actively involved in trying to provide patients with solutions or with the ability to access treatment they…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Ward, H. & Barratt, J. "Passing Your Advanced Nursing Osce: A Guide to Success in Advanced Clinical Skills Assessment." "Radcliffe Publishing, 2009"

Zuzelo, P.R. "The Clinical Nurse Specialist Handbook," (Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 15 Oct 2010)
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Clinical Interviewing Skills and Techniques in Social Work

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14816666

Clinical Interviewing as a Social Worker
Part A
The importance of effective clinical interviewing revolves around being able to establish a certain level of trust with the client. Essentially, the goal of the social worker is to get to the heart of the problem and to elucidate truth. It’s very difficult to get people to share honestly if they feel guarded or feel as though they are being judged. A presentation given at Minnesota State University at Moorhead found that the following personality traits are most crucial to clients when it comes to having a social worker: understanding, compassionate, pleasant, and possessing the ability to put others at ease (Bitfocus.com, 2016). Being able to embody these traits means that one is able to convey very aptly how much one is interested in one’s client and that one has kind intentions, as a safe person.
Maintaining confidentiality consistently is another vital…… [Read More]

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Clinical Nurse Leader Role Implementing

Words: 4307 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71454882

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and the Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (AACN, 1996; Dienemann & Aroian, 1995) operationally define the professional nurse as one who has been prepared with a minimum of a baccalaureate or higher degree in nursing. (Feldman & Greenberg, 2005, p. 219)

These were necessary requirement in the 90's. Now in an ever increasing age of need for more highly educated professional, the Clinical Nurse Leader armed with a Master's degree or better, is more adapted to handle a wide range of situations and create a fulcrum from which to balance all the staff in a given unit.

Literature eview

Clinical Nurse Leader

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

This article is a report regarding the decisions calling for a new role for nurses. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing…… [Read More]

References

Dalton, B., & Wright, L. (1999). Using Community Input for the Curriculum Review Process. Journal of Social Work Education, 35(2), 275.

Feldman, H.R. & Greenberg, M.J. (Eds.). (2005). Educating Nurses for Leadership. New York: Springer.

Kennedy, M.S.. (2004) Introducing the Clinical Nurse Leader. American Journal of Nursing, 104 (10), 22.

Knorr, R.S., Condon, S.K., Dwyer, F.M., & Hoffman, D.F. (2004). Tracking Pediatric Asthma: The Massachusetts Experience Using School Health Records. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112(14), 1424-1439.
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Role of Advanced Practice Nurse

Words: 3341 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91654659

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

Framework for Clinical Practice

Person/Client/Client System

Environment

Health

Nursing/APN (Factors Effecting APN's Practice and Implementation of the APN

Nursing Process)

Interrelationships of Client System, Environment, Health, and Nursing/APN

ole of Advanced Practice Nurse

esearch shows that an advanced practice nurse (APN) is first of all a nurse that has been recognized as a person that has advanced education. This person is also known t knowledge and skills prepared at the masters or doctorate level. It advanced practice nurse have a broader scope of practice than egistered Nurses (N) often performing the same duties as those that are doctors. Their primary care duties involve things such as diagnosing and managing the treatment of chronic and acute illnesses. Advanced practice nurses are the ones that keep the emphasis on advanced practice nurse and health promotion, with a stress on wellness. Advanced practice nurses may choose to work…… [Read More]

References:

Castner, D. (2011). The "coming out" of the advanced practice nurse. Nephrology Nursing Journal,, 28(4), 474.

Delametter, G.L. (2002). Advanced practice nursing and the role of the pediatric critical care nurse practitioner. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly,, 21(4), 16-21.

Swain, S.M. (2009). The role of clinical nurse educators in organ procurement organizations. . Progress in Transplantation, 284-7.

Villanueva, N.B.-R.-A. (2008). The role of the advanced practice nurse in neuroscience nursing: Results of the 2006 AANN membership survey. .Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 40(2), 119-24.
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Students in a Clinical Setting Evaluating Student

Words: 1643 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47576264

Students in a Clinical Setting

Evaluating student performance of any kind is always a controversial issue. However, assessing nursing skills is a particularly serious and controversial subject, given that if assessment is inadequate, the consequences for patients can be dire. It is essential that the evaluation of new nurses be accurate, particularly given the hope that many new nurses will be entering the profession, the result of new initiatives designed to cope with the pending nursing shortage due to the retirement of the current generation of older nurses. A review of existing literature indicates that the evaluation of nurses' competency is deemed to be problematic world-wide. Various strategies to remedy this have been suggested, including more rigorous training of and support for mentors who grade student nurses as well as the use of more objective assessment instruments.

According to Gopee (2008) in her article "Assessing student nurses' clinical skills: the…… [Read More]

References

Gopee, N. (2008). Assessing student nurses' clinical skills: the ethical competence of mentors. International Journal of Therapy & Rehabilitation, 15(9), 401-407.

Karayurt, O., Mert, H., & Beser, A. (2009). A study on development of a scale to assess nursing students' performance in clinical settings. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18(8), 1123-1130. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02417.x

Oermann, M. (2009 et al.). Clinical evaluation and grading practices. Schools of Nursing:

National Survey Findings Part II. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(6), 352-357.
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International Clinical Harmonisation Proper Systems in Place

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10839935

International Clinical Harmonisation

PROPER SYSTEMS IN PLACE

The International Congress Harmonisation

WHO Principles of Good Clinical Practice

Clinical research is conducted to insure the safety and efficacy of health and medical products and practices (WHO 2002). In the past, randomized controlled trials gave most of the information about the safety and efficacy of these products and treatments. Randomized clinical trials were considered the foundation of evidence-based medicine but reliably only when conducted according to principles and standards. These principles and standards comprise good clinical research or GCP. The guidelines were created to help national regulatory authorities, sponsors, investigators and ethics committees to implement GCP for overall clinical research. These were based on the guidelines provided by major international organizations, such as the International Conference on Harmonization or ICH GCP, and used as reference (WHO).

GCP incorporates accepted and established ethical and scientific quality standards complied with for the design, conduct,…… [Read More]

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Excellence in Clinical Nursing

Words: 798 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24064625

clinical nursing professionals require self knowledge as well as expertise in order to be successful in their field using Patricia Benner's book as a background. It has one source.

Clinical professions today require experts. In a clinical setting both nurses and doctor are equipped with information which will validate their presence for patient care. A critical understanding of the processes of diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of the patient is imperative as they are responsible for the patient care outcomes. Nurses today are playing a critical role as intermediaries, more knowledgeable than an attendant but with less expertise than the physicians themselves. Nursing is no longer a comparatively inferior career but a highly sophisticated field requiring clinical expert skills to carry out patient care duties. They are responsible for making on the spot decisions; act as coaches for aspiring nurses; specialize in certain areas such as rehabilitation, injuries, administrative nurses etc.…… [Read More]

Reference

Benner, PE (1984). From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, Calif: Addison Wesley Publishing Co, Inc.
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Masters in Nursing for Clinical Teaching the

Words: 2049 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41817290

Masters in Nursing for Clinical Teaching

The objective of this study is to examine the importance of a Masters in Nursing for the Nurse in Clinical Teaching endeavors.

The work of Orton (2007) entitled "Nurses As Clinical Teachers" Variables Affecting Teaching Comfort and Self-Efficacy" reports a descriptive correlations study that examined whether there was a "common understanding of a good clinical teacher among nursing students and faculty." (p.ix) Stated as a secondary purpose was the validation of a tool for development of individual prescriptions for improvement of the clinical teaching of nursing instructors.

Common Assumptions

A third stated purpose was testing for common assumptions about good teaching:

(1) if experience in clinical teaching leads to a better praxis;

(2) if educational training (the most common intervention) leads to better teaching;

(3) if experience in teaching (other than nursing) leads to better clinical teaching;

(4) if the education degree status has…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Benner, P., Sutphen, M., Leonard, V., and Day, L. (2010). Educating nurses: A call for radical transformation. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Davis, D.C., Dearman, K. Schwab, C. & Kitchens, E. (1992). Competencies of novice nurse educators. Journal of Nursing Education, 31(4), 159-164.

Krisman-Scott, M.A., Kershbaumer, Sr. R., & Thompson, J.E. (1998). Faculty preparation: a new solution to an old problem. Journal of Nursing Education, 37(7), 318-320.

Leuner, JD and Ruland, JP (2010) Master's Programs Preparing Nurse Educators: What is the Current State of Affairs. Nurse Educator. Vol. 35 No. 6. Retrieved from: http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/journalarticle?Article_ID=1078569
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Mobility Evidence-Based Practice Progressive Mobility Protocol This

Words: 1626 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76051675

Mobility

Evidence-based Practice

Progressive Mobility Protocol

This paper is a project based on PICO. The clinical question that serves as the foundation for this data-based design is; for immobile critical care patients, does the use of a nurse driven progressive mobility protocol reduce ICU LOS compared to every hour of repositioning? In this paper, the adult patients admitted to an ICU represent the population (P) of interest. The nurse driven progressive mobility represents the intervention (I), the comparison (C) is the critical care patients repositioned every two hours, and the reduction in LOS represents the result.

Most hospitals place critically ill patients on bed rest and reposition them every two hours in the intensive care unit. Some literature reviews provide evidence in favor of progressive mobility protocols. In addition, the paper also reviews the safety of mobilization of the critical patients and the negative effects bed rest may have on…… [Read More]

References

Plis, L. (2009). The Effectiveness of A Nurse-Driven Progressive Mobility Protocol on Reducing

Length of Stay in the Adult Intensive Care Unit. Retrieved from  https://www.chatham.edu/ccps/pdf/Plis.L.Final_Capstone.pdf 

Melnyk, B.M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing & Healthcare: A Guide to Best Practice.Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Goldhill, D., Imhoff, M., McLean, B., & Waldmann, C. (2007). Rotational Bed Therapy to Prevent and Treat Respiratory Complications: A Review and Meta-analysis. American Journal of Critical Care, 16(1), 50-61.
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Evidence Base Practiced Reseach Evidence Base Practiced

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2421077

Evidence Base Practiced eseach

Evidence Base Practiced esearch

Evidence-based practice is considered to be a combination of the best practice gotten from patient care data, research study, and expert opinion so as to identify dissimilar approaches of improvement in providing high quality care that reflects things such as needs, values, interest and selections of the patient. Skills and Knowledge gained in the procedure of evidence-based practice assist health care workers to bring about reforms in healthcare and raises individual responsibility of practice. Comparing evidence-based practice, getting comprehending of why things are done the way they are done and establishing actions that endorse evidence-based practice with the purpose of providing care that is better. With that said, this essay will argue why Evidenced-based practice is important to nursing practice.

One reason why evidenced-based practice is important to nursing practice is for the reason that Evidence-based practice is a key approach to…… [Read More]

References:

Calkins, M. (2006, July 8). Evidence-Based Nursing Education for Regulation (EBNER). Leading in Nursing Regulation. Chicago, Illinois, United States.

Kronenfeld, M. (2007). Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States. J Med Libr Assoc, 95(4), 1-407.

Winters, C.A. (2012). Teaching Strategies to Support Evidence-Based Practice. Academic Education, 32(3), 49-53.
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Standards of Practice on Diabetes

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24650203

diabetes.org/news-research/research/).

17) Can the outcomes be measured through standard care? Yes, qualitative and quantitative measurements are standard and needed based on the increasing number of Type II diabetes patients. This increase is primarily cultural, and due to obesity and an unhealthy diet.

One of the more serious aspects of type II diabetes is the new prevalence of onset during later teen years, most likely completely due to rising obesity patterns in children. Symptoms for both children and adults range from chronic fatigue, general weakness and malaise to excessive thirst, blurred vision, lethargy, and more serious internal dysfunction. There also appears to be a strong connection in type II diabetes to a genetic predisposition -- which is ironically a similar predisposition to hypertension, cholesterol issues and obesity. Clearly, the epidemic proportions of the disease have increased due to a rapidly aging population, high-fat diets, and a far less active lifestyle (Zimmer,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Diabetes Association. (2011). Standards of Care. Cited in:

http://www.care.diabetesjournals.org

Yach, D., et.al. (2006). Epidemiologic and Economic consequences of the Global Epidemics

Of Obesity and Diabetes. Nature. 12 (1): 62-66.
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Different Nurse Practice Specialties

Words: 1049 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66976609

Nurse Practice Specialties

The objective of this study is to locate four evidence-based research articles in nursing peer-reviewed journal. Specialty nursing includes various areas of nursing practice, which are examined in this study. Articles reviewed in this study include those related to emerging specialties and opportunities for nurses, Advanced Practice Registered Nursing, Nurse Practitioner Primary Care in Competencies in Specialty Areas, and the Specialty Practice of Nursing Informatics.

The first article examined in this study is the work of Cruz (2012) who reports that Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) "arose out of the trailblazing efforts of nurses from four separate nursing specialties whose individual histories were shaped by a common threat: the answer the call to deliver a high level of healthcare to individuals and groups in an area of clinical practice where a need for such level of healthcare existed." (p.1) Cruz (2012) additionally reports four areas of concern…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beattle, L. (2010) Emerging Specialties, and Opportunities for Nurses. NurseZone. 11 Jun 2010. Retrieved from: http://www.nursezone.com/nursing-news-events/more-features.aspx?articleid=34360

Bickford, CJ and Lewis, D (2007) ANI Connection: The Specialty of Nursing Informatics. CIN Computers, Informatics, Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 6, Dec 2007. Retrieved from: http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/journalarticle?article_id=753408

Cruz, J. (2012) Whose Consensus Is It Anyway? All Nurses. 1 Sept 2012. Retrieved from: http://allnurses.com/nurse-practitioners-np/whose-consensus-anyway-779977.html

Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas: Adult, Family, Gerontological, Pediatric, and Women's Health (2002) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Service Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, April 2002. Retrieved from:  http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education-resources/npcompetencies.pdf
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Social Work Supervision of Clinical

Words: 5496 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54097164

By improving their self knowledge, leaders can change and develop as leaders of people. Clinical supervision for leaders is sometimes called administrative clinical supervision. This is managerial clinical supervision with a focus on problems related to leadership and organization of work, particularly human relations issues. Administrative clinical supervision makes use of experiential learning focused on oneself and one's work (Sirola-Karvinen and Hyrkas, 2008).

Administrative clinical supervision means clinical supervision for leaders that address leadership issues in order to achieve set goals. Supervision promotes cohesion within the organization and is directed at change. Administrative clinical supervision is the examination of leadership in which leaders have the chance to reflect upon the quality of their decisions and share their feelings. In terms of action, administrative clinical supervision involves process-like support and mentoring, which boost the leader's confidence in coping with leadership duties and changes associated with it. Administrative clinical supervision addresses issues…… [Read More]

References

Clinical supervision 'can inoculate staff against stress'. (2010). Mental Health Practice. 13(7),

p.8.

Clinical Supervision. (2009). Retrieved June 27, 2010, Australian College of Mental Health

Nurses Web site: http://www.acmhn.org/career-resources/clinical-supervision.html
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Leading and Managing a Change in Clinical

Words: 2227 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8818781

Leading and Managing a Change in Clinical Practice: Patient on Ventilator and the Usage of Saline in Performing Suctioning

Organizational direction depends on many factors. Most of them were an integral part of clinical practice for a while, but until the latter part of the 20th century has been so prominent in the organizational structure. This paper will explore the four factors that influence the management of clinic and are characterized by efficient designs. This paper will discuss about the leadership and management in relation to improving quality, change, care management, values and results. We will also present integration and possible implementation concepts, tools and strategies.

Discussion

Suctioning the patient on ventilator pose a unique challenge in following a clinical pathway or case management model of care. Our patient is on ventilator and we are performing suctioning by the usage of saline solution. Multiple decisions need to be made when…… [Read More]

References

Dougherty, Lisa and Lister, Sara (2004) The Royal Marsden Hospital Manual of Clinical Nursing Procedures Sixth Edition (Royal Marsden Nhs Trust) Wiley-Blackwell; 6th Edition (24 Jun 2004) 896 pages

Hamric, A.B. (with Spross, J.A, Hanson, C.M.), Spross, J.A.(with Hanson, C.M.), & Hanson, C.M. (2005). Advanced practice nursing an integrative approach (Third, pp. 311-335)

Kelly, Diane. (2007) Applying quality management in healthcare: A systems approach. 2nd Edition: Health Administration Press. P. 17-89

Kovner, A.R., Neuhauser, D., (ed). (2004). Health Services Management; Readings, Cases, and Commentary (eighth, pp 125-271). Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press. Washington, D.C.: AUPHA Press
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Forensic and Clinical Roles and Assessment While

Words: 1410 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27727725

Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment

While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct areas of practice. This means that the role of the forensic and clinical practitioner differs in several ways: "who the client of the psychologist is the nature of the relationship between the psychologist and the individual being evaluated, and the psychologist's approach to the material provided by the individual" (Packer, 2008). Moreover, it also means that the professional assesses the individual differently. These differences include: the purpose of the assessment, the goal of the intervention, and psycho-legal vs. psychological assessment. While the differences may seem clear, the reality is that even forensic evaluations can lead to the establishment of the type of relationships that develop in clinical practice, making it difficult for health care professionals and for their clients to differentiate…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2011). Specialty guidelines for forensic psychologists.

Retrieved September 8, 2013 from American Psychology-Law Society website: http://www.ap-ls.org/aboutpsychlaw/SGFP_Final_Approved_2011.pdf
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Advance Nursing Practices in the

Words: 2098 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73429250

This help in solving conflicts between patients in a hospital.

In nursing practice, there are quite different in between clinical nursing specialist and nurse practitioner in the scope of operation. Therefore, a clinic nurse specialist works under the legislated scope of practice for a registered nurse but has advanced education. While nurse practitioner works under a separate scope of practice and can perform certain functions and tasks that are outside of the scope of practice of registered nurse, including clinical nurse specialist. However, nurse practitioner generally provide primary care, and clinical nurse specialists act more a s consultants in their roles as expert clinicians, clinical leader, educators, collaborators and researchers.

Many researches have written that emotions sometimes can influence ethical decision making in a health care system. Therefore, nurses are equipped with knowledge to make decision without any kind of influence. The model demonstrates that certain emotional states influence the…… [Read More]

References

Royal of nursing college (2010). Advanced nurse practitioners, an RCN guide to the advanced

Nurse, Practitioner role, competences and program accreditation

Marie-Laure Delamaire, Gaetan Lafortune (2010). Nurses in Advanced Roles

A description and evaluation of experiences in 12 developed countries
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Should Clinicians Use Evidence based Practice

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54519481

Evidence-Based Practices When Working With Clients

Evidence-based practice is a concept that emerged in the field of medicine to help lessen mistakes or errors during treatment. This concept seeks to do so through ensuring clinical decisions are grounded on the best available research evidence. Since its emergence, the concept of evidence-based practice has become common in the medical field and is constantly used to help improve patient outcomes. The tremendous success of this concept in medicine is attributable to its integration of the best available research evidence, clinical judgment and expertise, and patient preferences and values.

Given its success in the field of medicine, evidence-based practice is being imported into the field of psychology (Lilienfeld, 2014). This trend emerges from the need for clinicians to utilize the most suitable and effective mechanisms to improve their clients' outcomes. Current evidence postulates that utilizing interventions that have been shown to work with…… [Read More]

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Integration Evidence-Based Practice Professional Nursing Practice the

Words: 1686 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58309443

Integration Evidence-Based Practice Professional Nursing Practice

The concept of evidence-based practice -- EBP is becoming growingly significant in the sphere of nursing. (Stiffler; Cullen, 2010) Evidence-based practice is not entirely a novel concept; it is the manner in which nurses cater to the norms of care and practice efficiently. (Nysna, 2006) According to Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, N, FAAN, vice president and chief nursing officer in the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, evidence-based practice -- EBP in reality it is only an alternative mode of viewing the conventional theme of the nurses maintaining their sanctified reliability with society. (Wessling, 2008) David Sackett, MD, a Canadian physician, is regarded the father of evidence-based practice. According to Sackett, "evidence-based practice is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. . .[by] integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external…… [Read More]

References

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie. (2005) "Evidence-Based Practice and School

Nursing" The Journal of School Nursing, vol. 21 no. 5, pp: 258-265.

Ciliska, Donna. (2006) "8. Evidence-based nursing: how far have we come? What's next?"

Evid-Based Nurs, vol. 9, no. 2, pp: 38-40.
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Enhancing Best Clinical and Business Best Practices

Words: 1472 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78227559

Healthcare Management (Discussion questions)

Healthcare organizations must always strive to provide quality care to their patients. This empowers them to be ahead of their competition and in line with the various rules set by healthcare bodies and the government. As such, companies often try to adopt best practices have been proven to be successful in other institutions. A best practice refers to a technique or method that has consistently shown or proved results superior to those attained by other means. Best practices can also be defined as methods used by organizations as benchmarks. According to Bogan and English (1994), benchmarks are used to uphold quality as an alternate solution to the enacted standards. The diversities within societies in terms of ethnicity, race, and religion calls for the importance of adopting affordable and quality care within the health care organizations.

According to Chin et al. (2012), the obert Wood Johnson Foundation…… [Read More]

References

Kay, J. (2007). "Health Care Benchmarking." Medical Bulletin, 12(2): 22-27

Houser, J. & Oman, K.S. (2011). "Evidenced-Based Practice: An Implementation Guide for Healthcare Organizations." Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett LearningQuality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures

Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures

Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures
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Learners a Clinical Setting --Desirable Staff Role

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49607540

learners a clinical setting --Desirable staff role models? What risks mitigated?

Discuss three assessment strategies you would use to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical instructor

In-class, scheduled observations are one of the most common methods used to assess the effectiveness of instructors. Of course, this method is not foolproof -- an instructor will likely show off the class at its best, when he or she is anticipating a visit from an evaluator. However, even a planned visit at least demonstrates to the evaluator what the teacher believes are his or her strengths. The teacher's method of interacting with the class, the classes' responsiveness to the teacher's demeanor and the teacher's method of structuring the lesson plan can all be reviewed.

Unplanned observations, of course, take away the ability of the teacher to prepare for a visitor (although the teacher can be warned that unplanned assessments will occur throughout the…… [Read More]

References

Cardillo, Donna. (2005). Do nurses eat their young? Nurse Week. Retrieved:

http://www.nurseweek.com/news/Features/05-01/DearDonna_01-10-05.asp

Murray, Cyril & Andrew Main. (2005). Role modeling as a teaching method for student mentors. Nursing Times, 101 (26: 30).  http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice-clinical-research/role-modelling-as-a-teaching-method-for-student-mentors/203794.article
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Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

Words: 4260 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80307899

Ethical Theory & Moral Practice

Debates about theory and practice are ancient. Each generation considers the dynamics that surround issues about the interdependency of theory and praxis to be uniquely challenging. Complexity is a variable closely linked with knowledge. As science has added layer upon layer of knowledge, decision-making dilemmas have been confounded by new and staggering concomitant factors. In concert, theoretical frameworks for social science disciplines have been adapted to accept newly identified moral imperatives and ethical considerations.

This paper offers a discussion about the nexus of epistemology, ethics / morality, and praxis. An examination of the historical development of the paradigm and the assumptions of post-positivism is presented as an introductory foundation for the discussion. Next, is a discussion about ethical theory, followed by an exploration of the increasing division between philosophical frameworks and evolving modern science. Particular note is made of the theory-practice gap in healthcare, which…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, T.L. (2007). Does Ethical Theory Have a Future in Bioethics? The Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. 32(2): 209-217.

"Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" (2008). Conference 2008. Retrieved online: http://www.bezinningscentrum.nl/links / special_links5/special_links5_conference.shtml

Fieser, J. (2009). Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved online:  http://www.iep.utm.edu/ethics/#H3 

Gastmans, C. (1998). Nursing Considered as Moral Practice: A Philosophical-Ethical Interpretation of Nursing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8(1): 43-69.
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Medication Reconciliation Evidence-Based Practice and the Procedural

Words: 6404 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3318945

Medication econciliation

Evidence-Based Practice and the Procedural Education of Nurses

Medication reconciliation is a critical issue in healthcare reform. Today, improvement in this area of treatment could have a transformative effect on the current practices of nursing and medicine administration. The discussion, literature review and research tests that are conducted hereafter will outline the implications of medication reconciliation; justify the call for improvement in this treatment area; and offer support for the resultant recommendations using the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) template as a guide. The discussion will provide a background discussion on the three primary procedural steps by which medication reconciliation is defined: Verifying Medications by Collecting an Accurate Medication History; Clarifying Information by Ensuring Medications and Doses Are Appropriate, and; econciling and Documenting Change. Additionally, the discussion will offer a literature review as a means of providing some comprehensive knowledge of current practices in the field.…… [Read More]

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Medication Reconciliation. U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services.

Alabama Universal Medication Form, Retrieved April 28, 2012 from: http://alaha.org/uploadedFiles/Resources/UniversalMedicationForm.pdf

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). (2008). The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. Quality and Safety
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Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Evidence-Based Nursing

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62586742

The evidence base suggests that approaches such as exercise, screening for treatable risk factors, energy conservation and activity management, progressive muscle relaxation, and education and anticipatory guidance are likely to be effective in reducing fatigue. Anticipating which interventions are likely to be effective can assist clinicians in the design of a multi-component fatigue treatment approaches. Clinicians also can use these results to examine their own practices, identifying intervention strategies such as complementary therapies that may be recommended only infrequently for fatigue but still hold the potential to be effective (Mitchell, Beck, Edwards Hood, Moore, and Tanner, 2006).

Evidence-based practice was adopted in a similar format to the Grove's model in the fact that it was developed by studying what works and what doesn't. In order to produce the best outcome for patients it is important to not waste time trying several treatment options unless these options have been studied and…… [Read More]

References

Evidence-Based Nursing. (2008). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from The Joanna Briggs Institute Web

site: http://www.joannabriggs.edu.au/about/eb_nursing.php

Mitchell, Sandra A., Beck, Susan L., Edwards Hood, Linda, Moore, Katen and Tanner, Ellen R.

(2006). Putting Evidence Into Practice: Fatigue During and Following Cancer and Its
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Management Issues and Practices James Strong the

Words: 2719 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78166394

Management Issues and Practices

James Strong, the former CEO and managing director of Qantas Airlines, twice sat on the panel convened at the Sydney office of CPA Australia to select those who would be recognized for the annual 40 Young Business Leaders list. Strong believed in the importance of nurturing young talent and threw himself wholeheartedly into leading much of the discussion among prominent leaders from all over the globe. Criteria for entrants included "the ability to land a top job, develop others and get the most from a team, and leading by example was also a must-have attribute" ("CPA Australia," 2014). To provide the scope and depth of the list-building endeavor, it is informative to explore the names of other participants on the panel, and to match them to the criteria they articulated for entrant evaluation. Here is a quick run down: James Strong looked for entrants who had…… [Read More]

References 13

40 young business leaders. In the Black. 2014 CPA Australia Ltd. Retrieved from http://www.itbdigital.com/lists/40-young-business-leaders-2013/

Bennis, W. (1997). Managing people is like herding cats. Covey Leadership Center.

Braithwaite, J. & Mannion, R. (2011). Managing change. In K. Walshe & J. Smith, Healthcare Management, pp. 830-861. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education.

Cummings, G.G., McGregor, T., Davey, M. Lee, H., Wong, C.A., Lo, E., Muise, M. & Strafford, E. (2010). Leadership styles and outcome patterns for the nursing workforce and work environment: A systematic review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 47(3), 363-385. doi: 10.1016/j.jnurstu.2009.08.006.
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Change Framework to Lateral Violence in Nursing Practice

Words: 4316 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11718018

Introduction

Lateral violence includes all acts of intimidation, humiliation bullying, unwarranted criticism and angry outbursts among other forms from a worker directed to another working (Clarke, 2014). In my current practice, most experienced nurses often feel superior to their inexperienced junior nurses. Therefore, they treat them with contempt as they feel they are more knowledgeable than them. For instance, one nurse may respond with an outburst on anyone enquiring of something that a colleague may have already have explained or considered it a too obvious. In some instances, one nurse may be disrespectful to others and refuse to engage another nurse in sharing patient information or other information that is pertinent to the nursing practice. If no one is willing to talk about and to address lateral violence, it will become a culture in nursing practice that will hinder teamwork and information sharing thereby hampering the overall quality of service.…… [Read More]