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Cultural Schemata Theory Together With Formal Schemata

Words: 1631 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74524173

Cultural Schemata Theory:

Together with formal schemata and linguistic schemata, cultural schemata are some of the main types of schema theory, which is a hypothesis on how knowledge is gained and processed. Actually, schema is a technical word used by cognitive supporters to explain how people arrange, process, and store information in their brain. Notably, schemata focus on how people arrange information to long-term memory in relation to experiences, attitudes, values, strategies, skills, and conceptual understanding. The schema theory is founded on the belief that every act of an individual's understanding includes his/her knowledge of the world. The received knowledge is in turn organized into units that contain stores information.

Understanding Cultural Schemata Theory:

Cultural schemata is also known as abstract, story, or linguistic schema and is developed on the basis of people's basic experiences ("Schemata Theory in Learning," n.d.). Cultural schemata theory is described as the pre-existing knowledge about…… [Read More]

References:

Fuhong, T. (2004, April 10). Cultural Schema and Reading Comprehension. Retrieved December 5, 2011, from  http://www.celea.org.cn/pastversion/lw/pdf/TanFuhong.pdf 

Gilakjani, A.P. & Ahmadi, S.M. (2011. June). The Relationship between L2 Reading

Comprehension and Schema Theory: A Matter of Text Familiarity. Journal of Information and Education Technology, 1(2), pp. 142-149, Retrieved from  http://www.ijiet.org/papers/24-K002.pdf 

Gudykunst, W.B. (2005). Theorizing about intercultural communication. Thousand Oaks:
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Cultural Intelligence in Today's Increasingly Culturally Diverse

Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90887850

Cultural Intelligence

In today's increasingly culturally diverse world, cultural competence, or what has become known as "cultural intelligence (CQ)" has received increasing research attention. Several authors, with various purposes and audiences, have developed assessment instruments to help individuals and groups understand their level of cultural intelligence. Included among these is the instrument developed by Earley and Mosakowski (2004), under the title "Diagnosing Your Cultural Intelligence."

Earley and Mosakowski's instrument addresses three areas of CQ: The cognitive, the physical, and the emotional/motivational. The cognitive component can be regarded as the "head" of cultural competence. On a cognitive level, this areas focuses on an individual's understanding of differences between cultures. This involves asking questions and investigations to identify any differences that might exist among cultures. Being aware of these on a cognitive level can greatly enhance a person's ability to understand and interact with foreign cultures.

The physical component focuses on a…… [Read More]

References

Earley, P.C. & Mosakowski, E. 2004. 'Cultural intelligence', Harvard Business Review, 82 (10), October, pp.139-146 [Online]

Mendenhall, Mark. 2007. Global Leadership: Research, Practice and Development. Routledge.
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Cultural Competency in Nursing

Words: 1874 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 29513439

Cultural Competency in Nursing

The basic knowledge in nursing or medical studies needs substantial facilitation in order to be effective and appropriate towards addressing the needs and preferences of the patients. Watson notes the need to integrate humanistic aspect into the career or nursing profession. He also believes on the need for the establishment of the caring relationship between the patients and nurses thus demonstration of unconditional acceptance of the patients in any condition. Nurses should integrate holistic and positive treatment with the aim of promoting health through knowledge and interventions thus elimination of interruptions during treatments or 'caring moments'. Modern patients have diverse problems and issues because of the cultural differences, races, and ethnicity thus the need to enhance the operations of the nurses. There is need to ensure that the nurses obtain cultural competencies with the aim of enhancing their ability to address diverse issues and problems faced…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, N.L.R., Calvillo, E.R., & Fongwa, M.N. (2007). Community-based approaches to strengthen cultural competency in nursing education and practice. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18(1), 49S-59S.

Beach, M.C. (2005). Cultural competency: A systematic review of health care provider educational interventions. Cultural Competency, 43(4), 356-373.

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services: A model of care. The Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 181-185.

Rosswurm and Larrabee, (1999). A Model for Change to Evidence-Based
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Cultural Differences in Today's World Then Explain

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15989882

cultural differences in today's world. Then explain two ways you might address those challenges in your professional life. Support your responses using current literature.

Challenges of diversity: Positives and negatives

Affirmative action embodies many of the paradoxes of the diversity of American society. On one hand, America has long proclaimed itself a land of freedom and equality. However, for many years, African-Americans and other minority groups were discriminated against, resulting in economic, educational, as well as political disenfranchisement. Affirmative action, or taking race into consideration to promote a more diverse environment in schools and in the workplace, is one way to create a fairer and more pluralistic society. It reflects the fact that persons who are privileged in America have historically come from specific races, classes, and ethnicities. However, many people believe that affirmative action's use of racial preference is, in effect, a form of discrimination itself. The courts have…… [Read More]

References

Kassin, S., Fein, S., & Markus, H.R. (2010). Social psychology. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

The Harvard Clinical and Translation Science Center (2009). Cultural Competence in Research. Retrieved on February 10, 2013 from  http://www.mfdp.med.harvard.edu/catalyst/publications/Cultural_Competence_Annotated_Bibliograp 

hy.pdf.

Write Response to colleague's
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Cultural Sensitivity in Social Work

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68305881

Culture & Social Work

Regardless of the background and upbringing of an individual, there are common threads and patterns that typify everyone's life as a child and as they develop. However, there are most certainly variations when it comes to things like culture and the society that is lived within during this process. Even when speaking of a singular cultural area like a city, state or especially a nation, there will be differing norms, values and so forth based on the culture or cultures that one is exposed to and raised within. This report will look at the common Latino experience as well as a few other notable cultures and how this can affect and vary the interactions and reactions seen when it comes to social work. While trying to treat every situation with the same cultural and societal lens might seem attractive, the underlying cultures and patterns that actually…… [Read More]

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Cultural care of an Aboriginal patient in an Australian hospital

Words: 1901 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53146497

Australia, indigenous people recognize themselves as belonging to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or by descent, and also identified as the same by the society. A resistance has been observed in them to access hospitals for healthcare. Therefore, healthcare professionals need to plan, implement and maintain appropriate policies for their treatment. Also, cross-cultural awareness training should be given to paediatric hospital staff. (Munns & Shields, 2013, p. 22)

How would you support ianna and her family in this situation?

The poor health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is well documented, and has been the subject of official policy and program attention for many years. The mainstream health system has responded to increased funding and clear portfolio responsibility, with increasing attention to the burden of illness that Aboriginal people experience and the need for effective health care (Dwyer et al., 2014). I would thus make arrangement for proper…… [Read More]

References

Ansuya. (2012). Transcultural Nursing: Cultural Competence in Nurses. International Journal of Nursing Education, Volume 4(1), pp. 5-7.

Durey, A, Wynaden, D, Thompson, SC, Davidson, PM, Bessarab, D & Katzenellenbogen, JM. (2012). Owning Solutions: A Collaborative Model to Improve Quality in Hospital Care for Aboriginal Australians. Nursing Inquiry, Volume 19(2), pp. 144-152.

Dwyer, J, Willis, E & Kelly, J. (2014). Hospitals Caring for Rural Aboriginal Patients: Holding Response and Denial. Australian Health Review, Volume 38(5), pp. 546-551.

Kelly, J & Willis, E. (2014). Travelling to the City for Hospital Care: Access Factors in Country Aboriginal Patient Journeys. Australian Journal of Rural Health, Volume 22(3), pp. 109-113.
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Cultural Differences

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58364988

U.S. healthcare system built dominant European-American cultural values, beliefs, practices. These differ dominant values, beliefs, practices cultural groups Mexicans. Compare contrast values/beliefs/practices cultural group.

The first important difference is one between formalism and lack of formalism. European-American cultural values are less formal, but Mexicans will need to be addressed with Mr. / Mrs. At the first meeting. It will also be important to continue this type of address throughout the consultation. Compared to the European-American approach, the male is believed to be the head of the family and, in a traditional Mexican family, he will be the one who provides for the family, as well as the one making the final decisions. This could imply that he is the one who needs to be explained in more detail the procedures, the treatment etc.

It is also important to note the religiousness of the Mexican community, usually much more profound that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. http://www.aarphealthcare.com/insurance/managed-care-plans.html. Last retrieved on April 18, 2014

2. Cartwright, A., Shingles, R.R. Cultural considerations when working with Mexicans. On the Internet at  http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/cultural-considerations-when-working-with-mexicans . Last retrieved on April 18, 2014

3. Betancourt, J. (2002). CULTURAL COMPETENCE IN HEALTH CARE:

EMERGING FRAMEWORKS AND PRACTICAL APPROACHES. New York.
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Personal Awareness of Cultural Bias in Social and Cultural Diversity

Words: 2763 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49030133

Cultural bias implies an emphasized distinction or preferential status that indicates a predilection for one culture, over another. It is often discriminative, and is characterized by an absence of integration in a group, in terms of social principles, codes of conduct, and beliefs. Cultural partisanship introduces the accepted behaviors of one group as superior, and more valued, than those of another lesser-respected cultural group. In my surroundings, most of the residents, and hence, patients are white, making us (Afro-Americans and Asians) minorities, feel different if not isolated. Such deferential factors are responsible for establishing where specific individuals live, and what opportunities are available to them, in the healthcare and educational context (Sue et al., 2009)

Question 2

The presence of cultural bias within the context of healthcare-related recommendations and decision-making gives rise to significant challenges. Well-documented inequalities in health status of different racial and ethnic communities, in addition to nationally-publicized…… [Read More]

Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/culturalcompetence/)

American Psychiatric Association's Steering Committee to Reduce Disparities in Access to Psychiatric Care (2004) (Natl. Assoc. Social Workers 2007).

These and many more substantive readings from research are listed by the author for assimilating culture-centric education. (Sue, Zane, Nagayama Hall, & Berger, 2009)

Question 7

As a Counselor, I will need to be aware that being culturally aware implies delivering services in a manner consistent with the recipient's culture, through regards to linguistic variation and cultural discussion. I would seek to be more sensitive to unaccultured ethnic minority clients. In addition, I would use discretion in cases where patients of a particular community or ethnicity are prone to certain clinical problems (for which I would study the ethnic group and its history in more depth) and if certain ethnic groups respond poorly to EBT (Evidence-based Treatment). (Sue et al., 2009)
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Cultural Counselor Being a Counselor Can Sometimes

Words: 2185 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34235489

Cultural Counselor

Being a counselor can sometimes be a really tough job. Counseling can only be effective and beneficial when the counselor places himself or herself in the shoes of his or her client. If he or she is unable to do so, he or she will never become an effective counselor. Placing oneself in the circumstances of someone else is not easy, let alone placing oneself in the shoes of a person who is of a different race, religion or culture. That is the real test of a counselor. In this paper I shall discuss what is required to understand the cross-cultural relationships in counseling to help the client get over their problem easily. All the dimensions pertaining to counseling (of a client of a different background that the counselor) will discussed with the case scenario.

Case Scenario

When clients and counselors have different cultural (or ethnic or racial)…… [Read More]

References:

Cannon, E.P. (2008). "Promoting moral reasoning and multicultural competence during internship." Journal of Moral Education, 37(4), 503-518.

Crethar, Hugh C. And Ratts, Manivong J. (2008). "Why Social Justice is a Counseling Concern?"

Gilbert, Jane. (2002). "Cross-cultural issues in counseling skillstraining: lessons from Lesotho."

Journal of Social Development in Africa. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.
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Cultural Empowerment

Words: 779 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57264674

Cultural Empowerment

When planning a health promotion program, we should consider the positive (empowerment process) and the negative behaviors. As we begin to understand our intended audience we can assure the most culturally-appropriate educational intervention. In doing so, we are more likely to create partnerships that help people successfully achieve lasting change and truly promote health.

One of the most common issues that are not discussed in the armed forces is military sexual trauma (MST). This is when an individual will face unnecessary amounts of sexual pain from others they are serving with. A few most common forms include: unwanted sexual touching / grabbing, threating / offensive remarks about someone's body / sexual activities and unwarranted sexual advances. This has begun to occur so frequently that the Veteran Administration conducted a study, where they found that the total amounts of MST affected: 1 in every 5 women and 1 in…… [Read More]

References

Coping Skills for Trauma. (2004). Ibiblio.org. Retrieved from:  http://www.ibiblio.org/rcip/copingskills.html 

Military Sexual Trauma. (2011). VA. Retrieved from:  http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/military-sexual-trauma-general.asp 

Robins, A. (1992). Awaken the Giant Within. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster.
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Competence in Ethics

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 43421989

Competence in Ethics

ithin the university student's ken, "competent ethics" is an ideal that the student might achieve at some point in the future, after obtaining some basic skills in the university, practicing in the field, and earnestly remaining a perpetual student of ethics scholarship and interdisciplinary collaboration. A review of ethics research reveals that reputable scholars tend to build on and synthesize each other's work, constantly developing a framework for ethical professional behavior. Applying the best of these models to each ethical dilemma, the counseling professional acts competently in the instant situation, hones his/her skills and absorbs significant information for the next inevitable ethical dilemma.

Discussion

Hanford points out the impossible burden imposed upon American universities by stating, "…America has given its universities the task of producing competent professionals…" (Hanford, 2002, p. 106). In reality, university students "learn how to learn" to be competent professionals. Upon graduation, he/she is…… [Read More]

While we are supposed to discuss "competing ethics," my research shows a more organic process of scholars learning, developing and synthesizing steps for proper ethical consideration. For just one example, Seligman's Diagnosis and treatment planning in counseling, 3rd Edition, synthesizes the ethical models set forth by Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel in 1998 and Forest-Miller & Davis in 1995 to form a 10-step process for ethical decision-making (Seligman, 2004, p. 363). In 2009 development, Kocet, McCauley and Thompson further synthesize steps used by Seligman and others to set forth a 12-step process for ethical decision-making regarding student affairs which, with very little alteration, can be applied to counseling for all individuals. Kocet set forth the 12 steps in a 2011 Power Point presentation and, modified for counseling all individuals, the steps are:

"Develop an ethical worldview; identify the ethical dilemma/problem; weigh competing ethical principles; select relevant ethical guidelines/professional standards; examine potential cultural/contextual issues impacting the ethical dilemma; investigate applicable laws, policies, procedures, websites, etc., search for ethical/legal/professional precedence; collaborative consultation and brainstorming; evaluate possible consequences and options of action/inaction; choose a course of action; implement selected course of action; reflect on the experience as it relates to future ethical decisions" (Kocet, 2011, pp. 17-18).

The time, effort, knowledge, skill and collaboration involved in effectively applying these 12 steps shows the difficult-yet-vital job of developing ethical competence. Reviewing Kocet's 12 steps, the first step of "developing an ethical worldview" is acceptable provided it is based on a thorough knowledge of the American Counseling Association's Code of Ethics (American Counseling Association, 2012). It is incumbent on professional counselors to develop that "ethical worldview" according to the Ethics Code governing our profession; consequently, if there is dissonance between the ACA Ethics Code and the worldview we have already developed, we must defer to the Code, so long as we intend to remain professional American counselors. Thorough knowledge
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Cultural Dimension Theory One of

Words: 1514 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 31126435



Schwartz Values -- Conformity

Again, a paradigm shift between the old (traditional) ways and the new (seeing more Western influence

Tend to conform and obey clearer rules and structures; obeying parents, preserving the world as it is; no drastic changes.

Former ally, urban (non-conformist) versus rural (conformist); now non-conforming groups, fringe groups, opinions, blogs, political parties, social networking, clubs, etc. abound -- diversity is king; but there is a confrontation in this with advertising and media, which seeks to "sell" conformity in image.

EFEENCES

Hodgetts, ., et.al. (2005). International Management: Culture, Strategy and Behavior. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

House, et.al., (1998). Cultural Influences on Leadership and Organizations. Project Globe. etrieved from: http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/process.pdf

Killick, D. (2004). "Developing Awareness and Transforming Experience." Leeds

Metropolitan University. Cited in:

http://www.aiec.idp.com/pdf/Killick,%20David.pdf

Knoppen, D. And Saris, W. (2009).…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Hodgetts, R., et.al. (2005). International Management: Culture, Strategy and Behavior. New York: McGraw Hill.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

House, et.al., (1998). Cultural Influences on Leadership and Organizations. Project Globe. Retrieved from:  http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/process.pdf 

Killick, D. (2004). "Developing Awareness and Transforming Experience." Leeds
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Cultural Competancy Recent Awareness About

Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 11083706

The study reveals the ways culture and religion intersect with gender, and in fact the authors base their research on the theory of intersectionality. White privilege, gender, and any other issue related to social justice and personal consciousness is situational. Each individual will experience race, class, gender, power, religion, and ethnicity in different ways.

When reading the three articles, I first note their similarities. All three articles address white privilege. The problem with white privilege is that it is built into the social institutions upon which societies are built. White privilege can also be extended to refer to gender privilege and patriarchy, which is why Greenwood & Christian (2008) note that women from whatever culture or religion tend to gloss over their differences to bond together in sisterhood. Sisterhood might trump experiences such as racial prejudice and bias. However, when faced with the problem of the hijab, women who are…… [Read More]

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Effects of Recruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

Words: 3298 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93952133

ecruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

The Effects of ecruiting Methods on Cultural Diversity

Maintaining cultural diversity in an organization can lead to innovation and an increased competitive advantage in the marketplace. In the past, the term cultural diversity referred to differences in race or religion. Now, the term cultural diversity means much more than that. As the uniqueness of each individual is recognized, the term cultural diversity has grown to encompass many factors about a person and their background. Cultural diversity is no longer delineated by major lines of color and national origin. This research will explore the effects of human resources on cultural diversity within an organization.

Cultural Diversity and the Workforce

acial diversity issues have increased in importance since the Civil ights Movement of 1964. It was recognized that white, Caucasian, males still constituted the majority in the workforce. Until that time, the select group was treated as…… [Read More]

References

Avery, D.R. & McKay, P.F. (2006). Target practice. An organizational impression management approach to attracting minority and female job applicants. Personal Psychology.

Chrobot-Mason, D. & Leslie, J.B. (2003). The role of multicultural competence and emotional intelligence in managing diversity. 32 (3): 269-263.

Cox, T. (1993). Cultural diversity in organizations: Theory, research and practice. San Francisco,

CA: Berrett-Koehle Publishers, Inc.
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Cross-Cultural Counseling in the 21st Century

Words: 2622 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94553005

Coss Cultual Moes and Values: Middle-Easten Ameicans, South Asian-Ameicans and Native Ameicans

No longe a melting pot but moe like a salad bowl, the United States has always been a land of immigants and its divese demogaphic composition today is a eflection of this pocess. In fact, just one goup, Native Ameicans, can be egaded as being the oiginal inhabitants, but anthopologists ague that even these people likely migated fom othe continents tens of thousands of yeas ago, making them immigants in a sense as well. Thee goups in paticula stand out in the Ameican demogaphic mix as being in need of thoughtful attention in coss-cultual counseling situations, namely Middle-Easten Ameicans, South Asian-Ameicans and Native Ameicans. To detemine what counselos need to know in ode to develop effective inteventions fo membes fom these thee goups, this pape povides a eview of the liteatue, followed by a summay of the eseach…… [Read More]

references:

A study of Lumbee undergraduates. Journal of College Counseling, 9(1), 47-55.

South Asia countries. (2014). World Bank. Retrieved from  http://web.worldbank.org/ .
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Social Political and Cultural Pressures

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95800276

.....dreamed of becoming successful the field of social work or another career that involves helping people, I was told that I could not succeed in college because of my learning disability. The situation occurred when I was applying to join college to advance my professional development and skills. Throughout high school, I was in an individualized education program (IEP) because of the learning disability. I obtained decent grades in high school and also held several leadership and volunteer positions because of my passion to help others. However, when applying for college, I was told that I may not succeed because the learning disability was affecting my academic performance. The school administration told me that the course I was applying for was very demanding and a learning disability would affect my chances of success.

The situation was influenced by some external social, political and cultural factors, which made the school administration…… [Read More]

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Challenges in Cross-Cultural Counseling

Words: 3681 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72560009

cross-cultural values and mores to identify the author's interactions with gay, lesbian, and transgendered individuals, Latinas and individuals with disabilities. Further, this paper integrates the case study analyses provided in "Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy" and relevant Social Justice Counseling issues to support the discussions. In addition, for each of these three cultures, a discussion concerning what factors should be kept in mind during interfaces with each so that all parties are honored to facilitate work with them as a therapist, colleague, social acquaintance, partner, and neighbor. Finally, an analysis concerning what was especially easy and fun and what was challenging to understand about these cultures given the author's unique worldview is followed by a summary of the research and important findings about these three cultures and cross-cultural values and mores in the conclusion.

eview and Analysis

Gay, Lesbian, and Transgendered Individuals

With growing numbers of states legalizing…… [Read More]

References

Beam, C. (2014). Is Hispanic the same thing as Latina? Slate. Retrieved from http://www.

slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2009/05/is_hispanic_the_same_thing_as_latina.html.

Beecher, M.E. & Rabe, R.A. (2007, Spring). Practical guidelines for counseling students with disabilities. Journal of College Counseling, 7(1), 83-87.

Bess, J.A. & Stabb, S.D. (2009, July). The experiences of transgendered persons in psychotherapy: Voices and recommendations. Journal of Mental Health Counseling,
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Analyzing Healthcare Cultural Assessment

Words: 5773 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 24073629

cultural diversity issues and its impact on nursing professionals' practice. It assesses a client hailing from a different culture, and employs information derived from the assessment determining and reflecting on health practices and beliefs of the client's culture. Lastly, nurses' role in the care of patients hailing from diverse backgrounds care is analyzed, and a conclusion is drawn.

Client Interview Data

Client's health beliefs in relation to cultural diversity

The client comes from a family-focused background, in which she plays the role of chief household organizer and attends to her family and their needs. She believes one ought to lead a life of a good and virtuous individual, and support one's family, particularly in times of need. In her opinion, sickness must be tended to, for preserving life. She believes in healthcare professionals and services they offer, for leading a healthy life. She is comfortable having healthcare professionals take care…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association. (1998). Discrimination and Racism in Health Care. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Anderson, L. (2012, October 10). Cultural Competence in the Nursing Practice. Retrieved from Nurse Together:  http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competence-nursing-practice 

Coe, S. (2013, January 15). Cultural Competency in the Nursing Profession. Retrieved from Nurse Together:  http://www.nursetogether.com/cultural-competency-nursing-profession 

Graue, M., Dunning, T., Hausken, M. F., & Rokne, B. (2013). Challenges in managing elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings in Norway. Scand J Prim Health Care, 31(4), 241-247.
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Analyzing the Social Cultural Diversity

Words: 2609 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81908575

Social and Cultural Diversity

The U.S.A. is widely viewed as a unifying state in which immigrants are accommodated and assimilated into the largely 'white' dominant socio cultural structure. This principle has allowed the country to facilitate a friendly environment for the nation to sustain a pluralistic perspective. The immigrants retain and maintain their beliefs and ideals even as they adjust their lives to be practically functional in their new American society. Multicultural counseling has come up against three core challenges linked to such diversity. There is the culture, attitude and theoretical perspective; then there is the culture of the client and, finally the many variables naturally wound around individual characteristics (olton-rownlee, n.d.).

Oversimplifying the Client's Social asis: Application of universal categories is essential for our understanding of human experiences. However, if we lose sight of differences between individuals, it would lead to a range of ethical breaches. Clients are influenced…… [Read More]

Bibliography

ACA. (2014). 2014 ACA Code of Ethics. American Counselling Association.

Banks, J. A. (1996). Multicultural Education, Transformative Knowledge, and Action. New York: Teachers College Press.

Barnett, J., & Bivings, N. (n.d.). Culturally Sensitive Treatment and Ethical Practice. APA Divisions.

Bolton-Brownlee, A. (n.d.). Issues in Multicultural Counseling. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest. Retrieved from Eric Digests:  http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-925/issues.htm
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Cross-Cultural Competencies

Words: 986 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21093143

Krentzman and Townsend (2008) indicates that multicultural competence means "having the beliefs, knowledge, and skills necessary to work effectively with individuals different from one's self; that cultural competence includes all forms of difference; and that issues of social justice cannot be overlooked" (p. 7). Although improved cultural competency is widely regarded as being an important element of high quality health care services, it is not a "magic bullet" for mitigating existing inequities in the provision of such care (Larson & Ott, 2010). Nevertheless, developing cross-cultural competencies is viewed by many health care providers as an essential first step in improving access and the quality of health care services in Australia today (Sharma & Phillion, 2011). Therefore, in this context, the term "multicultural competence" is used to describe the relationship between a counselor and a patient in cross-cultural settings (An introduction to cultural competency, 2012). The focus of cultural competence is…… [Read More]

References

An introduction to cultural competency. (2012). Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

Retrieved July 21, 2014 from  https://www.racp.edu.au/index.cfm?objectid=FCBB0411 -

9 DFF-0474-A0B250ACA0737BF8.

Hawley, L.D. (2006, Fall). Reflecting teams and microcounseling in beginning counselor training: Practice in collaboration. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development, 45(2), 198-202.
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Jamaican Music a Cultural Evolution

Words: 4850 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47790806

Jamaican Music

It is never just about the music.

No matter how great the musician, music is always the expression of an entire culture, of a moment in history, of a particular place in time. The genius of a particular musician, the synergy of a particular group - these are both essential to the success or failure of a particular group. But that success or failure is never intrinsic to a single song, to a single album. Music that succeeds - both in its own time and later - does so because it has the ability to express something important about that moment in time. eggae has been able to provide just such an expression of the beliefs of a particular people at a moment in history for the last two years - and it has been able to do so because of its ability to change with larger political…… [Read More]

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Cultural Interaction and American Revolution

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38695040

Cross-Cultural Differences and Communication

Cultural identity is a significant force that shapes the interaction between people from different cultures. The contemporary globalization has made intercultural interactions inevitable in the contemporary society. People draw conclusions about other people's culture depending on a wide range of observations about the individual's way of live, values and behavior. For instance, understanding what people from specific cultural values helps in drawing about that culture in that specific aspect of value or behavior (Byram, 2015). For example, I have drawn the conclusion that martial art is a significant cultural practice in the Chinese culture. This conclusion is informed by the several Chinese films that I have watched that have largely been characterized by Martial Arts. This predominance of martial arts in these films informed the conclusion I have drawn from the Chinese culture.

UNIT 4 DISCUSSION

I am visiting a new country within a different culture…… [Read More]

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Cultural Differences in IQ Scores

Words: 2525 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 80317230

IQ Test Scores

Cultural Differences in IQ Test Scores

Most studies carried out in the United States to measure intelligence (IQ) indicate a significant gap in the IQ test scores of Blacks and Whites. The gap is more pronounced in certain areas of intelligence such as general intelligence and on tests requiring problem solving and more complex mental operations than on tests of rote learning and immediate memory. The gap has narrowed since the 1970s but still persists stubbornly. Debate has raged among the psychologists and social scientists about the reasons for the gap. The "hereditists" believe that the difference in the IQ test scores of Blacks and Whites is largely due to genetic reasons. The "environmentalists" are equally certain that the gap is due to environmental reasons and has nothing to do with genetics. This paper looks at both the heredity explanation as well as the environmental explanations of…… [Read More]

References

Dorfman, Donald D. (1995). "Soft Science with a Neoconservative Agenda." A Review of the Bell Curves. 40: 5. Contemporary Psychology, APA's journal of book reviews. Retrieved on June 20, 2004 at http://www.apa.org/journals/bell.html

Haughton, Noela A. (2002). "Biased Content, Context, and Values: An Examination of the SAT." Retrieved on June 20, 2004 at http://www.sq.4mg.com/IQincome.htm

Jencks, Christopher and Phillips, Meredith. (1998). "The Black- White Test Score Ga: An Introduction." (pp. 2-22) The Black-White Test Score Gap. Christopher Jencks and Meredith Phillips - eds. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

Keita, L. (1999). "Why Race Matters: Race Differences and What They Mean." The Western Journal of Black Studies. 23: 1, p. 65.
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Cultural Diversity Issue of Non-American Employees Communicating

Words: 4611 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43058477

cultural diversity issue of non-American employees communicating frequently in their own native language creating an environment of sensitivity and bias amongst the non-Hispanic community.

Handling Diversity in an Organization

The contents of this paper focus on the cultural diversity involving Films ecovery Systems, an American company located at the heart of Chicago, Illinois. The paper takes an insight into the issue and also proposes solutions that can resolve the problem. The most important aspect of the paper is that it takes into account the material we find and read in books and compares to what degree the literature is actually applicable in real life situations.

Academic Literature

The study of public administration includes a spectrum of many disciplines, which include psychology, sociology, philosophy and also management sciences. Even though, the nature of public administration does not conveniently classify its elements into components, public administration is primarily categorized to highlight the…… [Read More]

References

Leaders are Learned Optimists - The CLEMMER Group Management

Consulting, available at http://www.clemmer.net/excerpts/leaders_learned.shtml accessed on: March 31, 2004

Robert Bacal, Conflict Prevention In The Workplace, available at  http://www.work911.com/products/i-coop.htm , accessed on March 31, 2004

QSM Consulting - Leadership Driving Change, available at http://www.qsmconsulting.com/lds/index.shtml, accessed on: March 31, 2004
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Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings

Words: 478 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52197051

Cultural Diversity in Rural Settings for Nurses

On a continuum of cultural awareness to cultural relativity, how do you view yourself and your interactions with others?

As a nurse practitioner, it is easy to see the patient simply as a patient, as a sick person needing treatment, rather than a well person who perceives his or her body as only temporarily ill, but sees his or her person as permanently a part of a family and culture outside of the hospital. As Small and Dennis (2003) counsel, the increase in immigration has resulted in greater diversity of both patients and practitioners within the United States, rather than in traditional urban locations. Thus Small and Dennis remind the nurse that it is not simply enough to treat the patient, but the patient must also understand his or her illness in culturally comprehensible terms. A nurse must be able to communicate to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dennis, Betty Pierce & Ernestine B. Small. (Jan-Feb, 2003) "Incorporating cultural diversity in nursing care: an action plan" The ABNF Journal.

"New Position Statement Originated by: Council on Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice, Congress of Nursing." (1996) Adopted by: ANA Board of Directors.
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Steps to Initiate a Cultural Change in an Organization

Words: 1541 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 37227499

Cultural Change Within an Organization

The concept of culture, adopted from the Anthropology field has many definitions depending upon the perspective is defined from. Shafritz and Ott (1992) write that there are many meanings applied to culture and "when the term 'culture' is paired with the term 'organization' resulting is a "conceptual and semantic confusion." p. 492 Networks within the organization are not of the future indeed, for networking within organizational structure is the reality of right now or as stated by Linpnack and Stamps (1994) and cited by Agranaoff (2006) "the age of the network" has arrived. In fact, stated is the fact that networks are even supplanting the traditional hierarchy and markets. (paraphrased: Powell, 1990 cited y Agranaoff, 2006) and public managers "are enmeshed in a series of collaborative horizontal and vertical networks (Agranaoff and McGuire, 2003) and finally it is stated by Agranaoff who cites O'Toole (1997)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Agranaoff, Robert (2006) Inside Collaborative Networks: Ten Lessons for Public Managers." Public Administration Review; Dec 2006; 66 AIB/INFORM Global p. 56. Articles on Collaborative Public Management.

Cooper, T.L; Bryer, T.A. And Meek, J.W. (2006) Citizen-Centered Collaborative Public Management Public Administration Review in December 2006.

Kearney, R., and Berman, E. (1999). Public Sector Performance: Management, Motivation, and Measurement. Westview Press, Inc.

Lipnack, J and Stamps, J (1994) Regional Autonomy and State Paradigm Shifts. Regional and Federal Studies 10(2):10-34.
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Professional Communication Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

Words: 1623 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5979652

Professional Communication: Cultural Sensitivity Among Native Americans

In nursing school, we are normally taught that we should respect the dignity and rights of all clients. As the "world becomes reduced" and societies and individuals become more mobile, we are progressively able to network with people that are from other cultures. Cultural respect and competence for others becomes particularly significant for us as nurses and patient supporters. Applying the principles and theories of communication is important for sufficient patient care. A lot of various communication methods are executed and have diverse focuses. Small groups use mechanisms such as objectives, standards, cohesiveness, behaviors, and therapeutic issues. Duty, process and midrange groups are separate categories. Orientation, tension, cohesion, working and dissolution are stages groups go through. Successful personal and professional communication profits the patients and other health professionals; however, the lack of applicable communication can lead to poor patient results and a hostile…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barker, A.M. (2009). Advanced practice nursing -- Essential knowledge for the profession. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Doane, G. (2004). Exploring the heart of nursing Ethical Pratices. Nursing Ethics, 11(3), 241-251.

Makaroff, K.S. (210). Do We speak of Ethics. Nursing Ethics and, 17(5), 566-576.

Ryan, M. (2000). Learning to Care for Clients In Their World not Mine. Journal of Nursing Education, 3(9), 25-79.
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International Cultural Differences Over the

Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 91556626

This is the point that we can offer specific insights that will help corporations to establish training programs and procedures for addressing these issues. Once this happens, is when we can provide strategies that will reduce conflict and improve productivity.

What the Proposed Design will accomplish?

The proposed design will be able to determine what specific attributes must be used by corporations to deal with the various cultural differences inside their operations around the world. This will help executives in creating policies and procedures that will allow managers / employees to improve communication. While at the same time, it will help them to address a host of cultural differences that could be relevant to a specific country or region.

For example, if a firm decided to establish operations in Russia managers will have to understand that there are certain practices that must be embraced. This is because Russians are more…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Comparative Analysis. (2012). E How. Retrieved from: http://www.ehow.com/how_2095476_write-comparative-analysis.html

Hall, E. (1990). Understanding Cultural Differences. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press.

Johnson, B. (2004). Mixed Methods Research. Educational Researcher, 33, (7), 14 -- 26.

Ryan, R. (1999). The American Dream in Russia. Personal Social Psychology Bulletin, 25, (12), 1509 -- 1524.
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Music on Vocabulary Competence Writing Reading Comprehension

Words: 7250 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 1305508

Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

EFFETIVENESS OF MUSI ON VOABULARY

The Effectiveness of Music on Vocabulary ompetence, Writing, Reading omprehension and Motivation in English Language Learning in High-School

Most English language learners in high schools show poor vocabulary competence. The main reason for this is the limited level of exposure to the language. It is generally understood and practically acknowledged that words form the basic unit of language structure. Therefore lack of sufficient vocabulary constrains students from effectively communicating and freely expressing their ideas.

Vocabulary competence is critical to developing reading comprehension skills. Lack of vocabulary development is detrimental to the development of metacognitive skill that is important in comprehending advanced texts. omprehension is a major component of development of vocabulary, reading to learn. Therefore, reading comprehension it is quite challenging for students lacking adequate knowledge of meaning of words.…… [Read More]

Chapter IV: Results and Evaluation

The main purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of using music on vocabulary competence, writing, reading comprehension and motivation in English Language Learning in High school students as a part of the learning process in the classroom. Many teachers of English as a second language as well as the learners consider vocabulary as a critical factor in learning the language. Therefore it is important to develop creative and interesting ways of teaching vocabulary in English class. A qualitative study was appropriate for the research for the reason that the objective was exploratory (Creswell, 1998). The significance that was recognized to the singularities of teaching was examined with hermeneutic methods (Creswell, 2002).

In order to give a reply to the answer of the three research questions, mean scores and standard deviations were computed for each of the two groups on each of the three dependent measures at the ending of study. All three of the dependent measures are considered to be the evaluation of the sight-reading, the evaluation of the playing abilit, and the
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Culture Psychology

Words: 1950 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15291211

Cultural Psychology

Review of Saudi Arabia

Muslim culture is one of the religions with the oldest and most extensive histories. It has its impacts on the world's greatest civilizations such as Sultanate of Usmania, Saudi Arabia, and Middle East and in different eras, Muslim rulers have extended their kingdoms to various parts of the world. Muslim culture even has its imprints on various fields of Science and Sociology. Despite all the richness of this culture, it is the one facing major criticism globally. One after another, events are taking place in a sequence which has highlighted the importance of Muslim countries in global Politics and economy.

These days, political decisions taken by the governments of Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and other Muslim countries have become part of daily news headlines. On the other hand, the incident of 9/11 has changed the global scenario of this world. Policies of many western…… [Read More]

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Rct Relational Cultural Theory as

Words: 2229 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 4486894

RCT believes that everyone desires growth and that growth is by necessity connective in relational and cultural links. Mutual empathy and mutual empowerment foster these relationships in positive ways. (Jordan, "The role of mutual")

Sigmund Freud and Erik Erickson may arguably be two of the most influential icons in the field of human development and psychology. Their fundamental concept that human's develop over a lifetime and not just in a few stages from birth to adolescence and then are frozen into psychological patterns, revolutionized thinking in the field of developmental psychology. The term Life Span Development came to the fore as Erickson devised his eight stages of psychosocial development ranging from birth to eighty years old. Later as he himself passed eighty he realized that there is yet another stage and the count became nine. (Erikson & Erikson, 1997) One can see the striking resemblance between Erickson and Freud's stages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Comstock, Dana L., et al. "Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Bridging Relational, Multicultural, and Social Justice Competencies." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 279-288.

Crethar, Hugh C., Edil Torres Rivera, and Sara Nash. "In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms." Journal of Counseling and Development 86.3 (2008): 269-276

Erikson, E.H. & Erikson, J. M . The Life Cycle Completed / Extended Version. New York:

W.W. Norton. 1997
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Intercultural and or Cross-Cultural Communication Theories

Words: 1848 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 32191910

Support for the second hypothesis, that male speakers would be perceived as less cooperative than female speakers, also varied across situations, and the effect was even smaller" (Edwards & Hamilton 2004). Support for the Tannen model only was found after additional research was done, and a new questionnaire was given that scored recipient's self-perception in terms of feminine and masculine characteristics and inculcation into traditional gender roles. Individuals with strong gender self-images were more likely to fall in line with the Tannen model of women perceiving nurturance and males perceiving conflict in relatively neutral scenarios and seeing men in general as less cooperative.

This study is provocative on several levels, not the least of which in its stress upon the individualized nature of gender norms and the lack of inherent biological tendencies towards perceiving nurturance and conflict. It suggests the need to more carefully screen subjects in terms of individualized…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Edwards, Renee & Mark a Hamilton. "You Need to Understand My Gender Role: An Empirical

Test of Tannen's Model of Gender and Communication." Sex Roles. 50.7/8 (2004):

491-504. Research Library. ProQuest. 30 Oct. 2008  http://www.proquest.com/ 

Oetzel, John G. & Stella Ting-Toomey. "Face concerns in interpersonal conflict."
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HRM's Emerging Role as Cultural

Words: 3835 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 82917586

Give profile to people in the organization who are high performers and who also use the policies to create a view that success and work-life balance can go hand in hand. Organize some social functions at times suitable for children as well as adults and specifically invite the employees' family members. Introduce awards for managers or supervisors nominated by employees for having provided an environment where both employees' work productivity as well as their personal needs are addressed and enhanced. Organize award ceremonies for those employees who are playing an important role in changing the workplace culture. Finally, allow people to have pictures or other personal objects in their work area (Workplace culture, 2009).

Developing and valuing a workplace culture does not happen overnight and requires commitment from both employers and employees. It is important to build consensus for culture change from the top down as well as the bottom…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Altman, Y. (2008). On the future of work -- and hr. People & Strategy, p18-18, 1p; Vol. 31 Issue 4(an 36354212).

Bates, S. (2002, July). Facing the future - human resource management is changing. Retrieved April 7, 2009, from Findarticles.com (from HR Magazine):  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3495/is_7_47/ai_89025017/ 

DeNisi, a., & R.W., G. (2004). Human resource management. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Hewitt, G. (2005). Connecting strategy and hr. In M.L. Michael R. Losey, the future of human resource management (pp. 208-216). Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.
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Managing Cultural Differences in an Organization

Words: 1259 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53810970

Global Perspectives on Leadership

Working with individuals from Latin America requires significant consideration of various factors that influence the relationship and the realization of a shared organizational objective. Firstly, taking into consideration the cross-cultural communication that will dominate the interaction with individuals from this culture is imperative. The fact that cultural differences exist translate to the communication breakdown that should be managed by the leader of an organization. Developing a culture-sensitive environment will help eliminate such barriers. The leader should also consider the context and content of understanding business setup when working with individuals with Latin America culture. Textual analysis shows that Latin business culture focuses on the broad aspects of the organizational relationship, social approaches, and broad circumstances influencing the business (Moran, 2011, p. 215).

However, the culture of other states such as the U.S. places a strong emphasis on the communication content. The content of focus includes facts,…… [Read More]

References

Moran, Robert T. Managing Cultural Differences: Global Leadership Strategies for Cross-Cultural Business Success (8th Edition).: Routledge, . (2011). Print
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Jonothan Swift Foreign Language Competence

Words: 1482 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 93270142

He suggests that investment in a certain relationship before that relationship occurs, providing that the customer does eventually bring more revenue than costs to the company, is warranted. In order to shed more light on this situation, Blolos decided to determine "if and how the costs of managing existing and potential relationships are assessed" (92). Interviewing managers in 20 firms in four countries, the author found that the managers had difficulty grasping a definition for "relationship marketing," although they were aware of the concept of theory. They also had "cynical" views of relationships with other firms, although they identified relationship marketing as a positive practice. Further, Blols found that "a measurement problem exits," meaning it was difficult for managers to find a way to determine which relationships with which clients were worth pursuing (98). Although managers tended to believe that they had formed successful relationships, they could not measure that…… [Read More]

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Organizational Theory 2 What Core Competences Give

Words: 2740 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28567012

Organizational Theory #2

What core competences give an organization competitive advantage? What are examples of an organization's functional-level strategies?

Core competencies are those capabilities that are critical to a business achieving a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Typically, core competencies can be identified by certain common characteristics -- offering a benefit to the customer, difficult to imitate, uniquely identify the organization and easily leveraged to create many products or operate in many markets (Kern, 2010). The organization that is best able to use its resources to create value is in an ideal position to outperform the competition, thus creating advantage (Jones, 2010). Core competencies tend to change in response to changes in the environment. They are flexible, evolve over time and enable the company to enter apparently different markets with a clear and distinctive brand proposition. Examples of core competencies include manufacturing, research and development, new technology or organizational design…… [Read More]

References

Jones, G. (2010). Organizational theory, design, and change (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Terry, L.D., & Hoefer, R.A. (1995). Making politics and power respectable. Public Administration Review, 55(3), 298.
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Managerial Cross-Cultural Interaction

Words: 7475 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33443551

Management STYLE IN THE United States

Cultural Values and Business

Theory X vs. Theory Y

Management the High Tech Way

Management STYLE IN THE DOMINICAN EPUBLIC

CULTUAL VALUES AND Business

ole of Entrepreneurship

In the United States, management values, beliefs and attitudes have undergone a gradual shift away from the simplistic stance of planning, organizing and directing. Valuable managerial skills, no matter what culture is being considered, have traditionally been masculine skills, highlighting the dominant, assertive, and decisive elements of management behavior and downplaying the team and supportive aspects that are more readily identified with women. This traditional view is now giving way in the United States to an approach where team behaviour is seen as increasingly important to a truly successful management style.

The global leadership skills of the future will evolve from a combination of individual/group and masculine/feminine traits involving strategic thinking and communication skills. The final result…… [Read More]

References

Arnold, D.J. & Quelch, J.A. (1998). "New strategies in emerging markets." Sloan Management Review, 40, 7-20.

Bakhtari, H. (1995). "Cultural Effects on Management Style: A Comparative Study of American and Middle Eastern Management Styles." International Studies of Management & Organization, 25(3), 97+.

Barham, K., Fraser, J. & Heath, L. (1988). Management for the future. Foundation for Management Education/Ashridge Management College.

Bennis, W., Heil, G. & Stephens, D. (2000). Douglas McGregor, revisited: Managing the human side of enterprise. New York: John Wiley.
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Professional Portfolio Cultural and Personal

Words: 1220 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38893848

Some of these causes include shift work/long work hours, sleepiness, social/familial disruptions, vulnerable groups, long-term effects, and injuries. This is an indication that various institutions should focus on the evaluation of the causes of risks faced by nurses at the workplace in order to adopt and integrate quality interventions towards enhancing the safety of the nurses (Alison Trinkoff et al., 2008). One of the effective and influential approaches towards promotion of safety of the nurses is transformation of the working schedule to offer sufficient opportunity for the practitioners to recapture their energies following stressful interaction with the patients.

This is through minimization of the working hours as well as integration of favourable shifts to operate in the favour of the nurses as they seek to enhance their safety. It will also improve concentration levels of the nurses at the workplace thus quality relationship between the patients and nurses in addition…… [Read More]

References

Williams, L. (2008). Liability landscape: The value of a root causes analysis. Long-Term

Living: For the Continuing Care Professional, 57(11), 34-37.

Okes, D. (2008). The human-side of root cause analysis. Journal for Quality & Participation,

31(3), 20-29.
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Nurse Ethics the Personal Cultural

Words: 976 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33862229



This is a theoretical approach which assumes that the nurse will base all treatment decisions on an interest in achieving the patient's best overall health outcome. In light of this, there may be great value in approaching treatment with a cultural sensitivity to the diversity of needs which accompany the inherent diversity of individuals to be treated. Here, the healthcare practitioner must be particular immune to prejudices of an ethnic, racial, sexual or personal nature, with equal treatment quality and personal attention expected for all patrons of the medical system. This is why it is important for members of the healthcare community to be acquainted not just with the idea of a multitude of groups in its public, but with some level of understanding as to how different ethnic groups endure different health scenarios. The way that the nursing professional approaches healing -- with respect to the balance of personal…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

ANA. (2004). The Nurses Code of Ethics. The Center for Ethics and Human Rights.

President's Council on Bioethics (PCB). (2010). Being Human: Readings from the President's Council on Bioethics-Chapter 3: To Heal Sometimes, To Comfort Always. Georgetown University.
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Cross-Cultural Communication

Words: 1450 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57974514

Ocial Work Practice With Individuals: Engagement Strategies

First I need to get past Mr. Fahza's son in order to get to his father. I need the former's agreement because I need a smooth start. His son agreement would encourage a discussion under the right auspices.

According to The Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA) of 1990, Mr. Fahza has the right to be informed about his own clinical condition in order to take a decision about continuing with chemotherapy or going to the hospice and die peacefully. This is the strict approach of the western hemisphere.

The religion of Islam believes in death and resurrection of the body and soul, like Christianity. Islam also teaches about how to prepare for death, when aware that death is imminent. Statistics show that a vast majority of the American male population would want to know about the eventuality of dying because of a fatal illness…… [Read More]

Reference list:

Kagawa-Singer, M., & Backhall, L. (2001). "Negotiating cross-cultural issues at end of life." Journal of American Medical Association, 286(3001), 2993-. Available at:  http://ethnomed.org/clinical/end-of-life/Table2.pdf  retrieved: Oct 7th, 2014

Koenig B.A., Gates-Williams J. (1995) "Understanding cultural difference in caring for dying patients." West J. Med. Sep 1995; 163(3): 244 -- 249. Available at:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov /pmc/articles/PMC1303047/?page=4" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">