Forensic Psychologist Essays (Examples)

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The participants aren't given the right to access the records of forensic scientists. The consent of the concerned party is needed first. A fee is charged for recording keeping purposes.
Accessing the third party evidence requires approval of the attorney and concerned party.

The forensic professionals should be able to protect the identity of the confidential individuals and present the information in a balanced manner. The information concerned is of importance hence.

Methodologies and procedures

Using viable methods

The forensic professionals should use methods and procedures which are legal. The forensic professionals should view a matter from all angles while conducting treatment, examinations, scholarly work and consultation. They should be able to discard all plausible theories pertaining to a case.

Using many sources for checking

The forensic professionals should form an opinion after confirming from multiple sources. They should mention otherwise the limitations and weaknesses in a theory.

Views about people

The forensic professionals can voice their opinions….

Courtroom Psychology
This assessment addresses forensic psychological assessment. This question addresses some of the differences in forensic psychological work and clinical work. Most forensic psychologists are clinical psychologists who specialize in forensic work. These clinicians bring their clinical skills to the forensic assessment; however, there are unique circumstances in the forensic assessment that the clinician must consider. For example, it is infrequent that a client would lie, malinger, or withhold information in a clinical setting.

Differentiate between forensic assessment and clinical assessment.

The critical distinction between forensic assessment and clinical assessment is its juncture with law ("ABFP," 2009). Clinical assessment is focused on determinations of the mental, physical, and functional states of an individual, and on a determination of what -- if any -- interventions are needed to assist the person with adaptation ("ABFP," 2009). Forensic assessment is located in the intersection between clinical assessment -- the necessary basis for determinations that impact….

Forensic Psychologists in Determining the Award of Child Custody in Divorces
For a long time, children have been treated as personal property during divorce proceedings. This meant that the children were subject to subdivision amongst the parents like any other property the couple owned. According to Emery and Wyer (1987a), all personal property would revert to the husband. For this reason, children would become the property of the father. In the 1800s, the law started to change and begun awarding custody of children based on analysis of both parents. The tender years doctrine was adopted, which was used to award younger or tender children to the mother instead of the father (Gunsberg & Hymowitz, 2013). This was because the young children would still need their mother more, and she was considered a better parent due to her maternal nature. This preference was not cast in stone. If the father could….

Usually, it is more likely that the ruse is discovered by a forensic psychologist, and/or that there is simply too much evidence pointing to the fact that the criminal knew what he or she was doing when the crime was being committed (Adler, 2004).
The Likelihood of eoffending

Whether a criminal is likely to reoffend is something else that has to be considered by forensic psychologists. They are often asked to give their opinion on this issue when inmates are coming up for early release or when they are eligible for parole. There are other factors and opinions that are taken into account, of course, but having a professional, psychological opinion about whether a criminal has been "cured" of his or her behavior or will be likely to repeat it is very significant (Adler, 2004; Dalby, 1997). It can be difficult to determine what goes on in the mind of a….

Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment
While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct areas of practice. This means that the role of the forensic and clinical practitioner differs in several ways: "who the client of the psychologist is the nature of the relationship between the psychologist and the individual being evaluated, and the psychologist's approach to the material provided by the individual" (Packer, 2008). Moreover, it also means that the professional assesses the individual differently. These differences include: the purpose of the assessment, the goal of the intervention, and psycho-legal vs. psychological assessment. While the differences may seem clear, the reality is that even forensic evaluations can lead to the establishment of the type of relationships that develop in clinical practice, making it difficult for health care professionals and for their clients to differentiate….

Forensic Psychological Evaluation
Confidential Psychological Evaluation

IDENTIFYING INFORMATION:

Gender: Male Date of Report: 05/07/2012

Date of Birth: 10/01/1981 Age

Marital Status: Single Occupation: Unemployed

Race: Caucasian Education: GED

Referred by: Dr., B. Wynter

REASON FOR REFERRAL:

A Psychiatric Evaluation on May 19, 2006 by Barbara Wynter, License psychologist who is

Clinical administrator of Central Treatment Facility ward 1, 2, 3, was requested to further assist in diagnosis.

LIMITS OF CONFIDENTIALITY:

EVALUATION PROCEDURE:

INSTRUMENT-

DR, B. Wynters

MMPI (Spell out the name Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory)

Is a depressive component of scale 6. The items connote extraordinary emotional sensitivity or vulnerability that is dysphonic in tone. These items have a "poor little me" flavor, portraying the self as meek and innocuous, emotionally fragile, incapable of being a threat to others, and perhaps as being entitle to special concern and consideration for one's tender sensibilities. There is an implicit theme of resentment and lack of forgiveness; however, a high scores nurse grudges and are view as injustice collectors.

MCMI:….


Personal Qualities

I believe I possess a number of personality traits that are relevant to my career goals of becoming a lead forensics psychologist and earning a PhD in clinical psychology. Foremost among these is the fact that I am hard-working in both the intellectual and physical sense of the term. As a result of my solid work ethic, I am goal oriented and extremely driven to succeed in my aforementioned aims. I am also honorable, and have the best of intentions to better the quality of my life for my immediate family, which includes my husband and children.

Why Walden?

This program at Walden is an excellent match for me because it is compatible with the timeline that I would like to accomplish my goals in. Furthermore, I am convinced that this institution can offer me an education that will suitably prepare me for the future career and educational goals to which….

altenative appoach to Computeized Tomogaphy in foensic pathology.
Thomsen, A.H., Juik, A.G., Uhenholt, A.G., Vesteby, A. (2009).

Jounal: Foensic Science Intenational.

Publication Infomation: 2008, 183, 87-90.

Publishe Infomation:

The main pupose of this aticle is to see whethe o not CT scans ae necessay as a means of augmenting autopsies. The eseach question is: do the benefits of CT scans match the effot equied to implement this technology? Thee is no hypothesis fo this aticle; the authos wee cetainly non-patisan in thei appoach and assumptions. The sample was 20 dead bodies (including 15 males) with CT scans pefomed by the Depatment of Radiology at Aahus Univesity Hospital. I eviewed this aticle to ascetain the elevance of CT scans to foensic pathology.

Abstact: This aticle denotes the boons and the detiments associated with using CT scans as compaed to, and augmenting the usage of conventional autopsies fo foensic pathology. Oiginal eseach is conducted on 20 dead….

Instead, a representative sample is used. The larger the sample the better, obviously, because the larger the sample the less wiggle room there is going to be between the sample looked at and the entire body.
Perhaps another explanation for the margin of error in this study is noted in the abstract of the document, whereby it is acknowledged that they questionnaire looked at forensic psychologists that were retained or secured by the court as well as situations where one of the child custody parties in question retained the forensic psychologist. It is not immediately clear whether that figured into the margin of error because that would certainly affect the motives and even the outcome of the study in general but whether/how much of an impact was had was not immediately made clear.

Conclusion

In short, the margin of error in this study accounts for the fact that only a sliver of….

The authors of the article determined that by directing children into a specific line of questioning regraind a certain action "gives the child material that might appear in subsequent play or narrative" (Gilstrap and Cici, 2001).
The true relationship between both of these issues is that ultimately, Hewitt also engaged in leading children through the use of imagery, by asking them to draw how they would feel if something sexual did happen to them. Finally, the last problem identified with using clinical techniques in a forensic setting is related to relying on aspects of behavior as being congruous with abuse. Without properly attributing for the base rate of sexual abuse in the world or the population in which the children are, the propensity for gaining false positives is very real -- and problematic.

Thus, there are many different important concepts a forensic psychologist could take away form this particular article. One….

Insanity evaluations represent the most challenging forensic assessments in the criminal domain" (ogers, 2008, p.126). This is due to the fact that insanity evaluations require the psychologist to assess whether a defendant had a mental illness at the time that an offense was committed, and, whether that mental illness was related to the commission of the crime in a way that would make the defendant "insane" under applicable state laws. First, whether or not the defendant is presenting as mentally ill at the time of the assessment is often not relevant to the assessment; most defendants, processed and in the jail system, have access to medications and treatment that they may have lacked at the time of the crime. Therefore, it is important to realize that a defendant's competency to stand trial is a different issue than whether a defendant is not guilty by reason of insanity. If a….

Alter the Forensic Dynamics during an Interviewing Process
In this paper, we reveal how professional's attitudes, views, and knowledge do not necessarily match forensic research findings. Witness issues will then be discussed concerning research community. The study identifies some of the key factors that can alter or improve forensic dynamics during the interviewing process. This study focuses primarily on forensic dynamics relating to the interviewing young children and the associated challenges.

Expert knowledge and attitudes

It has been proven that professionals and social researchers (biased) towards information confirming their initial beliefs by refuting established opinions. Once established, beliefs and impressions challenged to contrary proof. Thus, belief systems and generalization can create a confirmation prejudice that may result in faulty understanding and wrong presentation, adversely affecting important decisions. egarding child victimization situations, such prejudice may result in dramatic repercussions presenting a serious risk to a person's legal rights or presenting a serious risk….

Forensic Assessment
In "The role of the Violence isk Appraisal Guide and Historical, Clinical, isk- 20 in U.S. courts: A case law survey," Vitacco et al. discuss the use of the psychological forensic assessment in predicting future dangerousness. The authors are very critical of the use of psychological assessments for these purposes because of their belief, which is affirmed by investigation into case law, that psychologists often get their predictions wrong. In other words, psychologists are not necessarily able to predict future dangerousness, which can make an assessment of future dangerousness little more than guesswork.

One of the cases mentioned by Vitacco et al. was the seminal case of Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983). The defendant, Thomas Barefoot, was convicted of murdering a police officer. He was charged with a capital offense and the jury had to determine whether or not Barefoot was eligible for the death penalty. In….

oles of a Police Psychologist in an Investigation
The following paper describes the roles played by a police psychologist in an investigation of a situation in which a former police officer has been killed. The police force constantly takes risks to save the lives and belongings of the people they serve. This force is known for its bravery and courage but when a situation involves the homicide of a former member of their own group, they are faced with extra trouble as their own safety becomes a concern for them. In addition to that, the pressure from media exacerbates the problem for the police force. In this case, the police force needs psychological support which is given to them by a police psychologist.

Introduction

Police offers face severe stress in their day-to-day routine. They risk their lives and their families in order to fulfill the duty assigned to them. Their bravery is tested….


Despite the fact that the field of forensic psychology was formally recognized by the American Psychological Association (APA) as a "subset" in 2001 (Salfati, 2009), aspects of this science have influenced law enforcement long before that. One of the most salient ways it does so is in terms of interviewing people for certain positions -- whether they be formal positions such as an appointment to a law enforcement position or informal ones such as witness and eyewitness testimony.

Various branches of the law have been made cognizant of the fact that individuals who work within law enforcement have a very tenuous, difficult job. There is a significantly greater amount of work -- and psychology -- involved in working as a police officer. Therefore, within the past several years law enforcement officials have included personality tests as part of the testing for police officers (Salfati, 2009). Although these tests are far from….

Forensic psychology refers to applying psychology to legal issues.  Forensic psychology can be applied to civil and criminal legal cases but is most commonly associated with criminal cases.

Ten possible essay topics / titles for forensic psychology are:

  1. Future Dangerousness: Can Forensic Psychologists Assess Future Risk
  2. Beyond Criminal Profiling: How Forensic Psychologists Help Law Enforcement
  3. Legally Crazy Versus Mentally Ill
  4. Victim Profiling: What Makes Some People Targets
  5. The Psychology of Policing
  6. Best Interests of the Child: How Forensic Psychologists Can Help in Child Custody Cases
  7. Inherently Unreliable: The Problem with Eyewitness Testimony
  8. Undeveloped Brains: Why Juveniles Should Not Be in the....

Key Components of a Detailed Outline for Conducting a Forensic Psychology Evaluation

I. Introduction
Purpose of evaluation
Legal context
Scope of evaluation

II. Data Collection and Review
Clinical interview
Psychological testing
Medical records review
Collateral information

III. Assessment
Psychological Functioning:
Diagnostic evaluation
Assessment of cognitive abilities
Exploration of personality traits
Evaluation of risk factors
Forensic Issues:
Competency to stand trial
Criminal responsibility
Mitigation
Treatment Considerations:
Psychotherapeutic needs
Psychopharmacological assessment

IV. Report Writing
Statement of qualifications
Summary of findings
Discussion of legal issues
Opinion and recommendations

Detailed Outline

I. Introduction
Purpose of Evaluation: Clearly state the specific legal or clinical purpose of the evaluation, such as competency....

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9 Pages
Research Paper

Business - Law

Legal Responsibilities and Rights of a Forensic Psychologist

Words: 3466
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Research Paper

The participants aren't given the right to access the records of forensic scientists. The consent of the concerned party is needed first. A fee is charged for recording…

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4 Pages
Essay

Business - Law

Role of a Forensic Psychologist

Words: 1820
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Courtroom Psychology This assessment addresses forensic psychological assessment. This question addresses some of the differences in forensic psychological work and clinical work. Most forensic psychologists are clinical psychologists who specialize…

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14 Pages
Research Paper

Children

Important Role Played by Forensic Psychologists During Divorce Cases

Words: 4688
Length: 14 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Forensic Psychologists in Determining the Award of Child Custody in Divorces For a long time, children have been treated as personal property during divorce proceedings. This meant that the…

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7 Pages
Research Paper

Criminal Justice

Forensic Research The Psychology of

Words: 2415
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Usually, it is more likely that the ruse is discovered by a forensic psychologist, and/or that there is simply too much evidence pointing to the fact that the…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Forensic and Clinical Roles and Assessment While

Words: 1410
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Forensic and Clinical oles and Assessment While psychologists and psychiatrists may engage in both clinical and forensic practice, it important to recognize that clinical and forensic practice are distinct…

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6 Pages
Chapter

Psychology

Forensic Psychological Evaluation

Words: 1732
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Chapter

Forensic Psychological Evaluation Confidential Psychological Evaluation IDENTIFYING INFORMATION: Gender: Male Date of Report: 05/07/2012 Date of Birth: 10/01/1981 Age Marital Status: Single Occupation: Unemployed Race: Caucasian Education: GED Referred by: Dr., B. Wynter REASON FOR REFERRAL: A Psychiatric…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

M S Forensics Psychology - Specialization

Words: 460
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Personal Qualities I believe I possess a number of personality traits that are relevant to my career goals of becoming a lead forensics psychologist and earning a PhD in clinical…

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7 Pages
Article Review

Disease

Alternative Approach to Computerized Tomography in Forensic

Words: 1983
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Article Review

altenative appoach to Computeized Tomogaphy in foensic pathology. Thomsen, A.H., Juik, A.G., Uhenholt, A.G., Vesteby, A. (2009). Jounal: Foensic Science Intenational. Publication Infomation: 2008, 183, 87-90. Publishe Infomation: The main pupose of this…

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2 Pages
Discussion Chapter

Children

Margin of Error the Forensic

Words: 618
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Discussion Chapter

Instead, a representative sample is used. The larger the sample the better, obviously, because the larger the sample the less wiggle room there is going to be between…

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2 Pages
Discussion Chapter

Children

Clinical Measures in Forensic Settings

Words: 710
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Discussion Chapter

The authors of the article determined that by directing children into a specific line of questioning regraind a certain action "gives the child material that might appear in…

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4 Pages
Discussion Chapter

Criminal Justice

Insanity Evaluations Represent the Most Challenging Forensic

Words: 1904
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Discussion Chapter

Insanity evaluations represent the most challenging forensic assessments in the criminal domain" (ogers, 2008, p.126). This is due to the fact that insanity evaluations require the psychologist to…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Children

Forensic Dynamics in the Interviewing Process

Words: 1224
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Alter the Forensic Dynamics during an Interviewing Process In this paper, we reveal how professional's attitudes, views, and knowledge do not necessarily match forensic research findings. Witness issues will…

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2 Pages
Discussion Chapter

Psychology

Forensic Assessment in The Role of the

Words: 861
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Discussion Chapter

Forensic Assessment In "The role of the Violence isk Appraisal Guide and Historical, Clinical, isk- 20 in U.S. courts: A case law survey," Vitacco et al. discuss the use…

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6 Pages
Essay

Criminal Justice

Roles of a Police Psychologist in an

Words: 2003
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

oles of a Police Psychologist in an Investigation The following paper describes the roles played by a police psychologist in an investigation of a situation in which a former police…

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2 Pages
Discussion Chapter

Psychology

Psychology - Intro to Forensics

Words: 652
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Discussion Chapter

Despite the fact that the field of forensic psychology was formally recognized by the American Psychological Association (APA) as a "subset" in 2001 (Salfati, 2009), aspects of this science…

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