Global War Essays (Examples)

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War on Terror Somehow the

Words: 375 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36537120

This did not occur, and that in fact flawed the structure and strength of the strategic plan that was in place. This further affirms that stated in the answer to the memo; restructuring was needed. Combined forces were needed, better training and efforts in support of the military were needed. Most of all there was and is still a need for reunification of forces. The memo discusses the importance of forces coming together and supporting and sustaining the views of the UN and its principles, not only would this give everyone involved a more global perspective it will also allow all parties an opportunity to focus their initiatives in unison. There is a need for unification, support, boosting of military morale, and various other initiatives. A fresh perspective is always a great first step.

eference

Smith, D. (2003, October 16). Your October 16, 2003 Memo e: Global War on…… [Read More]

Reference

Smith, D. (2003, October 16). Your October 16, 2003 Memo Re: Global War on Terrorism. Memo, pp.1-9.
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War in Afghanistan

Words: 3312 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62121514

ar in Afghanistan

After the terrorist group al Qaeda attacked the United States on September 11, 2001, the American military was sent to Afghanistan to attack the Taliban, and destroy their governing position. The Taliban became the target of the U.S. because they had allowed Osama bin Laden to use their country as a training ground for terrorist activities directed against the United States. However, the U.S. is now bogged down in what seems to be an unwinnable war against Taliban insurgents that cross the border from Pakistan. Moreover, there are militants in Afghanistan who object to foreign troops being in their country, and they have apparently joined with the insurgents and continue fighting the American and NATO forces in Afghanistan. This paper reviews the historical and contemporary causes of the war in Afghanistan, and critiques the positive outcomes as well as the negative outcomes of the U.S. engagement in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Associated Press. (2011). Suicide Bombers Kill Worshippers In Afghanistan. Retrieved November, 2011, from http://www.npr.com.

This is an article that brought to light the ongoing violence in Afghanistan, in specifics the proverbial suicide bomber situation, where an radical Islamic terrorist is willing to blow himself up in order to kill others. In this case the people killed with fellow Muslims -- worse yet, he killed people exiting a mosque following their worship services -- but clearly the message to the world was this: the NATO and U.S. presence in Afghanistan will never stop terrorists from doing whatever they want to do whenever they wish to do it.

Baktash, Hashmat, and Magnier, Mark. (2011). Suicide bombing in Kabul kills as many as 13

Americans. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 19, 2011, from  http://www.latimes.com
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Global Terror War Policy Advice

Words: 1797 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48239500



Conclusion:

The resolution of this policy counsel meeting is the endorsement of a refinement of Australia's terror policy with respect both to the preservation of constitutional rights and in terms of approach its relationship to the United States with balance and diplomacy. Recognizing the severity the security threat but simultaneously recognizing the need to refine policies so as to diminish the tendency toward inflaming the political and ideological anger of the developing world, Australia must spend the coming decades finding ways to quell such hostility. This will mean a closer consideration of the economic, political and trade policies that often have run aground of the interests of the developing world. Likewise, it means that Australia must function as a continued partner to the U.S. But also as a voice of conscience with respect to the discretionary use of military force or diplomatic finesse.

orks Cited:

Aly, a. (2007). Australian Muslim…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Aly, a. (2007). Australian Muslim Responses to the Discourse on Terrorism in the Australian Popular Media. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 42(1).

Australian Federal Police (AFP). (2009). Fighting Terrorism in Australia. www.afp.gov.au

BBC News. (2006). Australian Loses Terrorism Appeal. BBC News.

Brown, M. (2009). Al-Shabaab terrorists 'living in Australia.' ABC News. Online at http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/09/23/2693927.htm?section=justin
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Global Law and Politics Political and Legal

Words: 1871 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51280401

Global Law and Politics:

Political and legal institutions and communications have played an integral role in the development and provision of legitimacy in contemporary societies. This has been through the development of obligatory collective decisions, general legal principles, exercise of political power, and resolution of conflicts. In the new global system, these legal and political institutions have created and conveyed social values, political power, and social meaning in every sector of the society. Both of the institutions are considered as legitimate because they have been established on core values that are related to essential freedoms, the rule of law, and democracy.

Aspects of a New Global System:

Modern societies across the globe are faced with critical issues and problems that are dealt with at the global level by the establishment of laws and policies, which are developed in various institutions. Global law and politics has had a significant impact on…… [Read More]

References:

Concannon, T (2004), Chapter 5 - Resource Exploitation in Nigeria, Pambazuka News, viewed

27 December 2011,

Ejimeke, A (2010), The Oil Spills We Don't Hear About, The New York Times, viewed 27

December 2011,
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Global Management of McDonald Company

Words: 3780 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28825679

The capital requirements together with reserve policies were overhauled with the entry of new leadership and avenues of the company. Moreover, the company had to align compensation with long-term returns. The strategies, which were laid by the company after its revival was to settle the dividends of the purchasers, and pay debts, which had been accrued in payments (Stonehouse, 2004).

Porter's Five Force

The Porter's Five Forces have a great influence of the way McDonald's Company has been operating in the market. Literally, the company has embraced all the five figures making up the Porter's Five Forces. These are the forces, which influence the market as it happened to McDonald's Company. The company faced the threat of new entrants into the market. When the company was introduced, it dealt with different products, most of which were also being produced by some other companies. As such, the company had to shift…… [Read More]

References

Ahlstrom, D., & Bruton, G.D. (2010). International management: Strategy and culture in the emerging world. Australia: Southwestern Cengage Learning.

Facella, P., & Genn, a.M. (2009). Everything I know about business I learned at McDonald's:

The seven leadership principles that drive break out success. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Gilbert, S. (2009). The story of McDonald's. Mankato, MN: Creative Education.
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Global and National Hunger Can Be Described

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8830286

Global and National Hunger

Hunger can be described as a physical sensation of desiring food. Usually even the highly privileged may experience mild hunger, however brief experience will never be harmful. People suffering from hunger are a larger scale reference to individuals who are unable to eat sufficient food in meeting their basic nutritional needs for a sustained period of time. A large proportion of the world's populations are affected by hunger throughout history. Occasionally it result originates from plagues, war or adverse weather changes.

Several inter-related issues that cause hunger tend to be related to economic as well as other factors that cause poverty. A part from the named above causes of hunger we have drought, famine, diversification of land use to non-productive use, poor eating habit, inefficient agriculture, land right and ownership as other causes of hunger, (Anup Shah, 2010). As we try to solve the problem of…… [Read More]

References Anup Shah, ( 2010). Solving World Hunger Means Solving World Poverty" Retrieved November 4, 2012 from  http://www.globalissues.org/article/8/solving-world-hunger-means-solving-world-poverty 

Miguel De La Torre, (2012). Will You Eat Less to Reduce Global Hunger? Retrieved November 4, 2012 from http://www.ethicsdaily.com/will-you-eat-less-to-reduce-global-hunger -- cms-19941

World Hunger Education Service, (2011). "2012 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics" Retrieved November 4, 2012 from  http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm
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Global Cultural Analysis Nigeria

Words: 5263 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25995575

Global Business Cultural Analysis

Nigeria

Nigerian History

Synopsis of Nigerian government

Nigerian monarchy to presidential system

The evolution of Nigeria from British control to a civilian democratic government

Nigerian major commodities

Oil

Food

The major elements and dimensions of culture in Nigeria

Cultural dimensions

Individualism

Power distance

Masculinity

Uncertainty

Model of culture

Universalism or Particularize

How is the integration of elements and dimensions that Nigerians doing business in the country?

The effects of governments on the prospects for its business around the world

How the elements and dimensions compared with the United States, culture, and business?

The role of women in the workplace

Business visitors must be dressed in an elegant and tie (for men!)

Cross-cultural business transactions between the United States and Nigeria

Conclusion

eferences

Abstract

Thurstan Shaw and Steve Daniels, who are the founder for archaeological research proved in their research that Nigeria has been developed since 9,000…… [Read More]

References

Afolayan, T.E. (2011). Coming To America: The Social and Economic Mobility of African Immigrants in the United States. Inquiry (University of New Hampshire), 6-11. Retrieved from EBSCO host.

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=60705725&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Alutu, O.E., & Udhawuve, M.L. (2009). Unethical Practices in Nigerian Engineering Industries: Complications for Project Management. Journal of Management in Engineering, 25(1), 40-43. Doi: 10.1061 / (ASCE) 0742-597X (2009)25:1(40)

http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=35745908&site=ehost-live&scope=site
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War in Afghanistan Following the

Words: 3674 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30447159



Fallout

A section of commentators have taken issue with the manner in which the federal government denied suspected terrorist the due process of law as stipulated under the constitution. The government even commissioned the establishment of a torture chamber in Guantanamo Bay. This amounts to gross violation of human rights and civil liberties. There is another clause in the patriot act dubbed "enhanced surveillance procedures," which allows federal authorities to gather foreign intelligence by breaching firewalls of 'terrorist nations.' This controversial foreign policy clause damaged the relationship between America and the Middle East.

A section of scholars argues that key players in the oil industry manipulated the United States to wage war against Afghanistan. According to an article published on the BBC World Service in December 2007, the execution of Saddam Hussein was unwarranted. Political scientists reckon that a cartel of multinational oil companies wanted to control the oil in…… [Read More]

Van Bergen, J. (2003) "In the Absence of Democracy: The Designation and Material Support Provisions of the Anti-Terrorism Laws." Cardozo Pub. [?] Law Policy & Ethics Journal 2 (2003): 107.

Luca, B (2004). American foreign policy and global governance, in A. Gobbicchi (ed.), Globalization, armed conflicts and security (Rubbettino/CEMISS, Roma) 112-127

Fawcett, L. (2009) International Relations of the Middle East (2nd ed.) Oxford University Press
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Global Refugee Regime Seems to Be Veering

Words: 10399 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23350149

Global Refugee Regime eems to Be Veering Away From Traditional Rules

As the threat of war looms large, the situation of those displaced because of violence and fights is becoming the focal point of talks amidst humanitarian groups. Many wrote about the situation in Afghanistan. The last many years have brought about quite a lot of enormous "refugee movements and humanitarian emergencies." More than 50 million people have been displaced by conflicts, war and other disasters and things may get worse.

The many organizations that offer aid to those who are forced to flee from their native lands are trying their level best to reach out and help each one of them. But nations all over seem to be hesitant to take in refugees who do not have any place else to go. What is the solution? How can humanitarian agencies cope with the increasing number of refugees? A book…… [Read More]

Sources

Agamben, Giorgio (1995). We refugees.(Section 2: Issuing Identity) Symposium v49, n2 (Summer):114

Appling, Cathy (1995). United Nations Involvement in Haiti from a Humanitarian Perspective. Current World Leaders 38, 4, Aug, 83-98.

Copeland, Emily (1992). Global refugee policy: an agenda for the 1990s. (Conference Reports) International Migration Review v26, n3 (Fall):992

Deng, Francis M. (1995). Dealing with the Displaced: A Challenge to the International Community. Global Governance 1, 1, winter, 45-57.
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Global Organizations -- IMF at the Bretton

Words: 2584 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64134719

Global Organizations -- IMF

At the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944, that created the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, the Western capitalist nations sought to avoid a repetition of the events that led to the Great Depression and Second World War by establishing a stable international economic order that was not bound by the rigidity of the pre-1914 gold standard system. The interwar period of 1919-39 was one of economic and politic chaos, featuring deflationary devaluations, closed trading blocs, massive unemployment and the failure of the revived gold standard in 1925-31, which were key factors in the rise of the Nazi regime in Germany in 1933 and the fascist takeover of Japan that began in 1931. President Woodrow Wilson had been an early advocate of free trade and had warned against the nationalism and autarky in economic policies that became the norm in the 1920s and 1930s. Secretary of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bordo, M.D. "The Bretton Woods International Monetary System: A Historical Overview." pp. 3-108.

Boughton, J.M. 2001. Silent Revolution: The International Monetary Fund, 1979-1989. Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund.

Boughton, J.M. (2004). The IMF and the Force of History: Ten Events and Ten Ideas that Have Shaped the Institution. IMF Working Paper No. 04/75.

Kahler, M. (1990). The United States and the International Monetary Fund: Declining Influence or Declining Interest? Eds. Karns, M.P. And K.A. Mingst. The United States and Multilateral Institutions. Routledge, pp. 91-115.
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Global Domestic Security Threat Impact

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73547791



Global concerns: Russia, missile shields and cyberterrorism

Thus domestic concerns such as internal instability and even energy scarcity have global repercussions that affect NATO nations. That is why, despite the end of the Cold ar, tensions between NATO member and non-member nations remain bubbling so close to the surface. It has not been forgotten by the Russian leadership that NATO was founded to address the security concerns raised by the now-defunct institutions of the Soviet Union and the arsaw Pact. Fears of 'Star ars' shield defense systems were reignited in March when Secretary General Rasmussen, warning of the "looming threat of weapons of mass destruction," made a case for a missile shield system for all NATO alliance states against "unconventional weapons and the missiles that [they] could carry…Should Iran produce intermediate- and intercontinental-range missiles…the whole of the European continent, as well as all of Russia would be in range," he…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brunnstrom, David. "Missile Defense Needed Against Growing Threat, NATO Chief Says."

Reuters. March 26, 2009. May 14, 2010.

http://www.globalsecuritynewswire.org/gsn/nw_20100326_9638.php

Fedynsky, Peter. "NATO to Transfer Security Tasks to Afghan Government." Global Security.
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Global Trends the United States

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94316259

One of the positive aspects to all this is that there are several career counseling and orientation programs available within and outside of the military. These provide valuable information on "life after the military" and how to go about reintegrating in the civilian world. Most of those who leave, especially the younger ones, can opt to go back to school and earn a college degree (for those who do not have one) or even a master's or doctorate degree.

Another viable option when it comes to thinking about a career in the military is looking for future employers or colleges that accept experience in the military or provide equivalences. This means that a soldier's military occupation specialty can be aligned with related civilian specifications. Having an equivalence in the civilian world means being able to ease out of the military and enter available civilian jobs. These post-military career actions may…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Burns, R. (2011, May 24). Gates: Defense cuts mean smaller U.S. military. The Washington Times. Retrieved June 1, 2011 from  http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/may/24/gates-defense-cuts-mean-smaller-us-military/ 

Ratnesar, R. (2011, April 11). Military spending must be part of the deficit debate. Time. Retrieved June 1, 2011 from http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2064468,00.html
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Global Governmentality Governing International Spaces

Words: 1679 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78469826



In this order of ideas then, he strives to come up with a theory that explains the construction of global networks, as well as the systems they use to grow and prosper. In order to make his case, Kendall looks at global structures constructed in various domains, including society and technology. He comes to the realization that global peace and order can only be achieved with the full cooperation and collaboration of all structures in the international system. Additionally, there must exist a will and a way in order for the mentioned goals to be achieved. While he recognizes that his arguments address a certain kind of economists and politicians who promoted the idea of a uniform and powerful globalization, he hopes that his points will the least make for an interesting reading.

inally, in the last chapter of the book's first part, The Security of Governance, author Michael Dillon…… [Read More]

Finally, in the last chapter of the book's first part, The Security of Governance, author Michael Dillon starts at the premise that there exists a direct connection between the three components of population, government and security. This conclusion was found throughout a previous study, which came to raise new questions that are answered in the current analysis. In a perfect world, peace would be achieved through fruitful partnerships between private and public players and would ensure the safety of all populations and all classes. Yet, this is not the case and Dillon argues that while governmentality is the collection of cooperations and collaborations, it represents more of a "technological ontology that proceeds through reflexive epistemologies."

In other words, there is a direct connection between technology and ontology as they validate each other and support each other in reaching the pre-established goals. "Here the dialogical interplay of the ontological and the technological is in evidence. If it takes a metaphysic to imagine a technic, it takes a technic to realize a metaphysic. But even that rendition fails to do justice to the co-evolutionary dynamic that exists in the power relations between technology and ontology. This is a mutually disclosive relationship in which each seems propelled by independent dynamics as well: the technologist continuously to interrogate and refine systems, the ontologist to secure the meaning of being.

Larner, W., Walters, W., 2004, Global Governmentality: Governing International Spaces, Routledge
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Global Financing and Exchange Rate

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98722314

he globalization of poverty has indeed occurred during a period of rapid technological and scientific advance. While the latter has contributed to a vast increase in the potential capacity of the economic system to produce necessary goods and services, expanded levels of productivity have not translated into a corresponding reduction in levels of global poverty." (Chossudovsky, 1998)

he ability of corporations to easily pick up and move into cheaper labor havens throughout the hird World has actually led to more downsizing, corporate restructurings and the relocations of whole companies which has led to higher levels of unemployment and lower earnings throughout the urban communities and the rural farm. Unemployment was at one time localized in small segments but it has now become an international problem. "We live in a world so rich that global income is more than $31 trillion a year. In this world, the average person in some…… [Read More]

The objective of fighting poverty and improving the overall living standards of those individuals in the Third World and the newly emerging nations has become huge undertaking. One would think that the world would be getting richer based on the advances in technology and the many new economic opportunities in the global economy. "The global decline in living standards is not the result of a scarcity of productive resources as in preceding historical periods. The globalization of poverty has indeed occurred during a period of rapid technological and scientific advance. While the latter has contributed to a vast increase in the potential capacity of the economic system to produce necessary goods and services, expanded levels of productivity have not translated into a corresponding reduction in levels of global poverty." (Chossudovsky, 1998)

The ability of corporations to easily pick up and move into cheaper labor havens throughout the Third World has actually led to more downsizing, corporate restructurings and the relocations of whole companies which has led to higher levels of unemployment and lower earnings throughout the urban communities and the rural farm. Unemployment was at one time localized in small segments but it has now become an international problem. "We live in a world so rich that global income is more than $31 trillion a year. In this world, the average person in some countries earns more than $40,000 a year. But in this same world, 2.8 billion people -- more than half the people in developing countries -- live on less than $700 a year. Of these, 1.2 billion earn less than $1 a day." (Chossudovsky, 1998)

The World Bank is not a bank in the true sense of what the average person would consider a bank. The World Bank has more or less become a specialized poverty focused social and financial assistance program or agency. The World Bank falls under the jurisdiction of the United Nations and is one of their more specialized agencies. The World Bank consists of one hundred eighty four nations currently who are jointly responsible for the oversight of the institution and
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Global Community Globalization and the

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71270027

Using this concept, further solutions to this problem can be solicited. By continuing to involve states, NGOs, and IGOs, a solution to this problem can be achieved eventually, but only through community response. Researchers can continue to work toward discovering scientific solutions, NGOs and IGOS can offer incentives for companies and individuals to adopt new greenhouse gas cutting policies, and governments can enforce these policies. The global nature of this problem, in addition to the global community response that fostered both the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol exemplifies the importance of global community in dealing with this international issue.

A second global problem, the peak oil crisis, has established itself as a prime example of the need for global community and global community responses in this age of globalization. Since the use of fossil fuels for energy production first became mainstream, scientists and government officials knew…… [Read More]

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Global Cultural Politics the Process

Words: 2003 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64656937

This in turn will lead to a rift between civilizations, one that would encourage them to rediscover their own individual cultural identity. Therefore, the globalization of the world can mean the fragmentation of cultures and the possibility of new conflicts along civilization lines.

The theory of Samuel Huntington however has had several critics who argue that in fact the neo-liberal approach of world economics and politics will increase the financial resources of the world and thus foster the creation of a global culture based on similar moral values and norms. However, it is less likely for the neo-liberal practices to have this effect on the short-term because it is rather clear from the image of today's world that globalization has led, in a constant manner, to inequality. This consideration is rather simple and revolves around the issue of the distribution of resources. More precisely, the developed world has limited resources…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ayres, J.M. (2004) "Framing Collective Action Against Neo-liberalism: The Case of the "Anti-Globalization" Movement." Journal of World- Systems Research.. 14 May 2008. http://jwsr.ucr.edu/archive/vol10/number1/pdf/jwsr-v10n1-ayres.pdf

Forum Barcelona. (2004) "Theme 2: Is There a Global Culture? The Globalization of Media and the Culture of Societies." Session summaries. 14 May 2008. http://www.barcelona2004.org/eng/banco_del_conocimiento/documentos/ficha.cfm?IdDoc=1676

Huntington, S.P. (1996) the Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order, New York, Simon & Schuster.

Modelski, G.(n.d.) the four dimensions of globalization. 14 May 2008 https://faculty.washington.edu/modelski/Global4.html. html
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Global Ethical and Professional Issues

Words: 2788 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1800174

" (Johnson, 2005) the notion of ruling against the defendant in all identity theft or related cases may establish the wrong precedent for future cases. "On the other hand, if liability is too readily assessed, it will have the power to bankrupt valuable enterprises because of the often vast numbers of potential plaintiffs and consequent extensive resulting damages." (Johnson, 2005)

Internet security and identity theft is a very pervasive problem globally. In fact, most every nation with a web presence must deal with the same issue of hackers breaching server security or web browser security and stealing identities or other destructive behavior with malicious intent. The United States has a much more serious issue in this realm, however, when compared to countries within Europe, Asia, Africa, ussia, and South America. Although the threat remains global and can affect any nation at any time, the probability of identity theft in America…… [Read More]

References

Anthes, G. (2010) Security in the Cloud. Association for Computing Machinery. Communications of the ACM, 53(11), 16. Retrieved December 14, 2010, from ABI/INFORM Global. (Document ID: 2198161791).

Babcock, C. (2010) Cloud Computing Differences Between U.S. And Europe. Information Week. Retrieved from: http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/cloud-saas/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=224202598

2009. New Straits Times. Cyber security challenges. Retrieved from: http://www.lexisnexis.com.rlib.pace.edu/lnacui2api/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T10848791436&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T10848791439&cisb=22_T10848791438&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=151977&docNo=13

Campbell K., Gordon L., Loeb M., Zhou L. The economic cost of publicly announced information security breaches: empirical evidence from the stock market. Journal of Computer Security Vol.11 Number 3/2003 pgs 431-448
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Global Civil Society Since the

Words: 306 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16062447

What must however be noted is that globalization has sadly enough also had some negative impacts. Probably the most relevant example in this sense has been the emergence of a war on terrorism in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. Such actions are indeed linked to international law, which did stir up controversy but did not prevent the emergence of the war. "Terror can be regarded as a direct attack on global civil society, a way of creating fear and insecurity that are the opposite of civil society" (Kaldor, 2003). The final impact is that of major disruption in the consolidation of a strong global civil society.

eference:

Kaldor, M., 2003, the Idea of Global Civil Society, International Affairs, Vol.…… [Read More]

Reference:

Kaldor, M., 2003, the Idea of Global Civil Society, International Affairs, Vol. 79, No. 3, pp. 583-593
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Global Financing and Exchange Rate

Words: 1674 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92563041

That is supposed to have become one market which does not entail any tariff distinctions between the nations. But it should be noted that some of the analysts feel that it will never become a single entity market, but will remain separated into different varying national markets. The reason is being ascribed to "cultural, informational, logistic barriers and perhaps remaining discriminatory barriers all of which imply an incurable tendency to award contracts to local suppliers." (Is Culture a Major Barrier to a Single European Market? The Case of Public Purchasing)

The general aim of free trade has however changed and it is now not limited any more to the removal of barriers in being able to sell the products made in one country to other countries of the world. This is considered to be even more important for that of the developing countries wherein their progress in development made however…… [Read More]

References

Madsen, Poul Thois. "Is Culture a Major Barrier to a Single European Market? The Case of Public Purchasing" Retrieved at http://www.ihis.aau.dk/~pmadsen/purchase.htm. Accessed 18 September, 2005

Market Access and Protocol Commitments" Retrieved at http://www.uschina.org/public/wto/ch-memo.html. Accessed 18 September, 2005

Non-tariff Barriers to Imports" Retrieved at  http://www.wright.edu/~tran.dung/Chapter8_Pugel.htm . Accessed 18 September, 2005

Tariff" Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TariffAccessed 18 September, 2005
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Global Business Strategies

Words: 1374 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6586601

Global usiness Strategies

Vincent

The aftermath of World War II has seen the evolution of economic regionalism as a means for fostering foreign trade thereby economic growth of participating countries. Economic regionalism was a conscious attempt to manage the opportunities and constraints created by international economic tie-ups after World War II through institutional arrangements facilitating free flow of goods and services and coordination of foreign economic policies. It embraced free trade areas, customs unions, common markets and economic unions. On the basis of the level of integration the economic regionalism can be differentiated widely, which can be visualized in the form of creation of free trade areas, custom unions, common markets and economic unions. The member countries practice preferential tariffs levying comparatively lower rates of duty on imports of goods among themselves than that from non-member countries. Free trade among the member countries is protected by a schedule of customs…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Marcial, Pedro. "Venezuela and Regional Integration in South America" retrieved at http://wehner.tamu.edu/mgmt.www/NAFTA / spring99 / Groups99 / pedro / final.htm Accessed on 10 April, 2004

Regional Integration in Central America" Retrieved at http://www.itcilo.it/english/actrav/telearn/global/ilo/blokit/cacmin.htm. Accessed on 10 April, 2004

Stubbs, Nicole Anne. "Regional Economic Integration: a Comparison of NAFTA and the EU" retrieved at http://depts.washington.edu/canada/nafta / 98chapters / 4stubbsnafta98.htm Accessed on 10 April, 2004
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War in Afghanistan Is Visibly

Words: 2995 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54386899

S. forces were made to operate on ground and targeted operations were planned against the Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. There were significant individually planned battles and skirmishes between the U.S. army and Taliban often resulting in heavy losses to both sides. A tactic that Taliban often used in such conditions was the suicide attacks and planting improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that left the soldier carrying vehicles destroyed. The U.S. utilized an Iraqi style counter insurgency operations in the Afghan region that resulted in some strengthening of the conditions.

3.1.3 Power sharing agreements

In order to enhance the effectiveness of the U.S. presence in Afghanistan the U.S. forged agreements with many warring tribes and factions of the Northern Alliance to enhance the unity of these groups that were to be pitched against the Taliban. These agreements were aimed at removing the support base of Taliban and Al-Qaeda from the Afghan society…… [Read More]

References

Coll, S. (2005). Ghost wars: The secret history of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet invasion to September 10, 2001. Penguin.

Dreyfuss, R. (2005). Devil's game: how the United States helped unleash fundamentalist Islam. Metropolitan Books.

Giustozzi, a. (2008). Koran, Kalashnikov, and laptop: the neo-Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan. Columbia University Press.

Jones, a. (2013, Jan). Only Three Choices for Afghan Endgame: Compromise, Conflict, or Collapse: Counting down to 2014. TomDispatch.com. Retrieved from: [http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/01/28-3]
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Global Health

Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50326978

Global Health / Nursing Trends Wealthy Nations

In the era following World War II, industrialized nations, which were the most affluent nations in the world, invested more money into healthcare and social services than in the era prior to the war. This meant that many industries related to healthcare, including medical healthcare professionals, medical billing, support staff, and creative and building industries, experienced growth as well. The healthcare models in wealthy, postwar nations, did not all grow and develop in the same ways through the 1950s and 1960s. The spectrum of healthcare system types ranges from private market-based to state-owned and operated. Some countries, such as France and Japan, have healthcare systems that blend characteristics from both medical models. There are many historical and political factors beyond healthcare system arrangement, however, which are seriously impacting global health trends currently (Kovner and Knickman 2008).

The socioeconomic disparities between nations and their…… [Read More]

References

Dolan, Ed. (2011) What Can The U.S. Learn From Other Countries' Health Care Systems?. Business Insider. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessinsider.com/what-can-the-us-learn-from-other-countries-health-care-systems-2011-2#ixzz1JlZpWtvb 

Kovner, A & Knickman, J. (2008). Health Care Delivery in the United States. 9th Edition. Springer Publishing Company: New York.
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Global Business International Trade Has

Words: 1719 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14738072

Combined with the increasing prevalence of regional trading blocs, higher transportation costs may result in a move towards regional production rather than global. In other respects, however, Lonely Planet's business will remain essentially unchanged over the coming years.

Conclusion

The globalization of international trade has had a profound impact on Lonely Planet's operations. It has allowed the company to use offshore production centers that are capable of serving the global market. The monetary flows even at a relatively simple, one-product firm like LPP illustrate the degree to which economies around the world are intertwined. The company receives monetary inflows from dozens of nations, and disperses monetary flows to dozens more. Including small flows, the operations of Lonely Planet contribute to the economy of nearly every nation on earth.

The recent changes with respect to the global economy will continue to impact operations into the coming years, affecting the firm's ability…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Das, Dilip K. (2003). Financial Flows and Global Integration. Centre for the Study of Globalization and Regionalization. Retrieved April 1, 2009 fromhttp://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/csgr/research/workingpapers/2004/wp13204.pdf

Steil, Benn. (2007). The end of National Currency. Foreign Affairs. Retrieved April 1, 2009 from http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/62614/benn-steil/the-end-of-national-currency
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Global Overcapacity A Major Cause

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90939977

S., who is duly aware of their hardships and struggles. Again, there are many reasons why they are not given what they need to succeed (covert imperialism, ideological differences, etc.) but one of the main reasons is global overcapacity. If there are more countries producing goods and services the supply of those goods and services continue to increase. When supply goes up, and demand remains relatively unchanged (or static) one of the only ways to earn a profit is to lower costs (Judis, 2010). Lowering costs means a smaller profit margin. A smaller profit margin means, well, less money for the CEs and shareholders.

ne may think that this theory is a bit of a reach, that there is no conspiracy to retard the efforts of fledgling countries to take a power position in this new "flat" world (Friedman, 2005). And maybe they're right, there is no coordinated effort to…… [Read More]

One may think that this theory is a bit of a reach, that there is no conspiracy to retard the efforts of fledgling countries to take a power position in this new "flat" world (Friedman, 2005). And maybe they're right, there is no coordinated effort to do such a thing, it's just the way the system is set up. Either way, whether it's consciously done or unconsciously done, it's the way it is. The facts bear this out.

For starters, and to circle back to that Chinese proverb, why do countries in power continue to delivery fish, instead of curriculum on fishing techniques? Here is an excerpt, from an article regarding the ill effects of food dumping, that underscores this issue, "Food aid (when not for emergency relief) can actually be very destructive on the economy of the recipient nation and contribute to more hunger and poverty in the long-term. Free, subsidized, or cheap food, below market prices undercuts local farmers, who cannot compete and are driven out of jobs and into poverty, further slanting the market share of the larger producers such as those from the U.S. And Europe" (Shah, 2010). There's two additional points to make regarding this scenario. The first is obvious and an iteration of what's just been said, the reason countries in power give away food, supplies, and other resources is because it subverts the efforts of foreign competition. The other reason countries in power donate food, food in particular, is because it helps diminish the available supply in the U.S., thus reducing global overcapacity. One has, no doubt, heard of corn farmers burning their cornfields to serve a similar end, reduce supply to keep prices high.

In the face of this evidence, one can posit that the IMF and the World Bank are two institutions that work toward helping impoverished countries make it to the big stage. After all, they provide funding and assistance to many countries in need. Well, the rebuttal to this fact is that all money comes with strings attached. Or, in short, there's no such thing as a free lunch. Here is a rather concise description of the effect the IMF and World Bank have on the countries they assist, "the way it has happened has required poor countries to reduce spending on things like health, education and development, while debt repayment and other economic policies have been made the priority. In effect, the IMF and World Bank have demanded that poor nations lower the standard of living of their people" (Shah, 2010). The IMF and World Bank don't mind loaning money to struggling nations, as long as those nations follow their orders. It's really a form of new age imperialism whereby nations in power seek to exploit cheap labor and extract resources from
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War Without Mercy Race and Power in the Pacific War by John Dower

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69941282

War Without Mercy

John W. Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War. Pantheon, 1987.

John W. Dower is a professor of Japanese history who received his Ph.D. In History and Far Eastern Languages from Harvard University in 1972 and has written extensively about popular culture in his scholarly work on Japanese and U.S. foreign relations history, including books such as Empire and Aftermath, Japan in War and Peace, and Embracing Defeat.

John Dower uses a wide variety of sources from the U.S., Britain and Japan to prove his thesis that the Pacific War was a merciless racial struggle that had far more in common with Hitler's war on the Eastern Front than the war between Germany and the Western Allies. Among these are diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers, magazines, films, scholarly books and articles, radio broadcasts, official military and government documents, and statements by political and military…… [Read More]

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Global Socioeconomic Perspectives Describe and

Words: 1998 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66242570



Amnesty International (2010) also reports that domestic violence is the major cause of death and disability for women ages 16 to 44 years. Of course, there isn't any forgetting that women in Colombia and Darfur -- places of dangerous armed conflict -- are commonly raped. Amnesty International also notes that the trafficking of women has become a global issue; women are exploited sexually, raped, forced into hard labor and are victims of severe sexual and physical abuse.

The United States must take a stance in helping to protect women across the globe. On February 4, 2010, members of Congress introduced the International Violence Against Women Act (I-VAWA), an important step in protecting, defending and empowering women around the world. This would be a groundbreaking law as we live in a world where "approximately 1 out of 3 women worldwide has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her…… [Read More]

References:

European Parliament. "Background Note on the Political and Human Rights Situation in Sudan and Darfur." 2007. Retrieved on June 27, 2010, from the Web site:

www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2004_2009/.../696365en.pdf

Responsibility to Protect. 2010. Retrieved on June 26, 2010, from the Web site:

 http://www.responsibilitytoprotect.org/index.php/crises/37-the-crisis-in -darfur/201-human-rights-watch-abu-ghraib-darfur-call-for-prosecutions
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Global Political Economy the Global

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52228628

However, this is hardly enough to address further issues across the world economy, including poverty.

Despite the fact that trade has become significantly facilitated by the regulating authorities, it is also true that most member countries are developed countries, while developing countries receive very little in terms of policies to facilitate their international relationships within the trading regime. This has been the paradigm since the inception of the global trade regime. Powerful member countries as it were tended to control the regime.

Currently, the United States is at the most powerful relational position within the trade regime. As such, the country's voting power within the MF and World Bank remains significant, as does the fact of its privilege in the financial regime. The regime is structured in such a way that developed countries enjoy privileges that poorer countries do not. Because it can take advantage of the international strength of…… [Read More]

In conclusion, the IMF and WTO do valuable work in the global trade regime. However, they tend to favor the most powerful and richest member countries rather than those who are in need of help to enter the trading arena. Poorer countries are all but ignored, and the poverty problem remains significant. A truly equal global trade regime would involve an equal platform upon which all countries can trade equally and for the benefit of all involved.

Source

Ravenhill, John. Global Political Economy. Oxford University Press, 2008.
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Global Health the World Is an Increasingly

Words: 701 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58393819

Global Health

The world is an increasingly shrinking place. Globalization has interconnected countries through trade and technology (De Cock, Simone, Davison, Slutsker, 2010). Today's economic turmoil is a great example of how is essentially one big web: one country's economic downturn has a domino effect on others. Globalization has other consequences, such as the migration of people from areas of low economic development to those of growing economies. Also with the rise of powerful multinational corporations with global interests, they need a mobile international workforce. Essentially, the world is becoming one big community. In respect to global health this has certain implications. Events such as an epidemic in Ghana or an outbreak of tuberculosis in China are no longer isolated events. What happens in one corner in the world has the capability of being felt all over. If there is war and disease, this creates refugee populations that can unbalance…… [Read More]

References

De Cock, K.M., Simone, P.M., Davison, V., & Slutsker, L. (2013). The New Global Health. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 19(8), 1192-1197. doi:10.3201/eid1908.130121

Requejo Harris, J., Merialdi, M., Merzagora, F., Aureli, F., & Bustreo, F. (2010). The World Health Organization Policy on Global Women's Health: New Frontiers. Journal Of Women's Health (15409996), 19(11), 2115-2118. doi:10.1089/jwh.2010.2101

Stambos, V., Leydon, J., Riddell, M., Clothier, H., Catton, M., Featherstone, D., & Kelly, H. (2011). Evaluation of the World Health Organization Global Measles and Rubella Quality Assurance Program, 2001-2008. Journal Of Infectious Diseases, 204S499-S505. doi:10.1093/infdis/jir128
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Global Nutrition According to Who

Words: 434 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8540533



According to UNCEF, replacement of many nutrients such as protein, potassium, magnesium and zince is essential for recovery from malnutrition (http://www.unicefusa.org/news/news-from-the-field/treating-malnutrition-as.html).The organization mentions ready-to-use therapeutic foods such as F75 and Plumpy'nut. F75 is high in energy, fat, and protein, and provide a large amount of nutrients while Plumpy'nut contains vitamins A, B-complex, C, D, E, and K, and minerals calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, iodine, sodium, and selenium.

WHO advises that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables contains immune-system boosting mironutrients that can help those suffering from over nourishment to boost their body's natural defenses against infectious diseases (http://www.wpro.who.int/media_centre/press_releases/pr_20030304.htm)… [Read More]

In the United States, food is more readily available than in developing countries. Yet, there are still amply cases of malnutrition. The types I've cases I've seen while growing up have stemmed from the economic realities of low-income households who lacked the financial resources for food and/or the education and awareness to make good nutritional decisions and to seek the appropriate assistance to help their families.

According to UNICEF, replacement of many nutrients such as protein, potassium, magnesium and zince is essential for recovery from malnutrition (http://www.unicefusa.org/news/news-from-the-field/treating-malnutrition-as.html).The organization mentions ready-to-use therapeutic foods such as F75 and Plumpy'nut. F75 is high in energy, fat, and protein, and provide a large amount of nutrients while Plumpy'nut contains vitamins A, B-complex, C, D, E, and K, and minerals calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, iodine, sodium, and selenium.

WHO advises that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables contains immune-system boosting mironutrients that can help those suffering from over nourishment to boost their body's natural defenses against infectious diseases (http://www.wpro.who.int/media_centre/press_releases/pr_20030304.htm)
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Global Operations

Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18863866

Global Operations

One of the largest sources of competitive advantage for a global corporation is the ability to optimize operations on a world-wide scale by minimizing costs and maximizing revenues. This is accomplished by leveraging technology, manufacturing efficiencies, brand names, and/or capital across countries. The major thrust of Starbuck Corporation's global strategy has been to build a global brand to target customers in all major markets throughout the world. However, even with instant name recognition, the company has faced enormous challenges in applying its domestic business model to work in many foreign markets.

Starbucks was founded in 1971 as a gourmet coffee bean roaster and distributor and began to dominate the North American market over the following two decades. To continue its rapid growth and to combat the threat of future market saturation in its own domestic market, Starbucks turned its eye to international expansion in 1996 (Starbucks outlines international…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Coffee in a time of conflict: Starbucks' growth risks backlash (2003, April 17). CNN. Retrieved January 1, 2005 from Web site: http://www.cnn.com/2003/U.S./West/04/17/profile.starbucks.ap

Holmes, S, Kunii, I. Ewing, J. And Capell, K. (2003, June 9). For Starbucks, there's no place like home. Business Week. Retrieved January 1, 2005 from Web site: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/03_23/b3836056.htm

Planet Starbucks (B): caffeinating the world. Thunderbird, The Garvin School of International Management. Retrieved January 1, 2004 from Web site: http://216.239.63.104/search?q=cache:vIhzOOZBQ4gJ:www.thunderbird.edu/pdf/about_us/case_series/a07030013.pdf+Starbucks+and+dominance+and+%22north+america%22& hl=en

Starbucks outlines international growth strategy; focus on retail expansion and profitability. (2004, October 14). Business Wire. Retrieved January 1, 2005 from Web site: http://www.businesswire.com/webbox/bw.101404/242885958.htm
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Global Community -- a Difficult

Words: 1030 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58168563

"The creation of new jobs overseas will eventually lead to more jobs and higher incomes in the United States...An open economy leads to concentrated costs (and diffuse benefits) in the short-term and significant benefits in the long-term. Protectionism generates pain in both the short-term and the long-term." (Drezner, 2004, p.1) in short, what is good for commerce abroad will, in a free market, eventually yield dividends for the American consumer at home.

The allegation that globalization costs workers their jobs is not a new one, however. Even before outsourcing, it was alleged that globalization allowed American businesses to profit off of the lower wages in developing nations, and exploit the labor in these low-wage countries, particularly of poorly paid industrial workers such as women and children. According to anti-globalization activist Robert eissman, "the last 20 years of corporate globalization, even measured by the preferred indicators of the International Monetary Fund…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Drenzer, Daniel. "The Outsourcing Bogeyman." From Foreign Affairs, May/Jun 2004.

Oct 2006] http://www.foreignaffairs.org/20040501faessay83301/daniel-w-drezner/the-outsourcing-bogeyman.html

Weissman, Robert a. (with Russel Mokhiber). "Bush's Challenge: Globalization Good

For the Poor." Aug 2001. Alter.net. [7 Oct 2006] http://www.alternet.org/story/11297/
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Global Sustainability Can Be Defined as Meetings

Words: 891 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84946481

Global sustainability can be defined as "meetings the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." (Oskamp, 2000, p. 373) This can be interpreted to mean that the present generation must not overuse resources, or created problems which will effect future generations. Many see the problem with humans abusing the Earth's resources as a human behavior problem, and therefore psychologists, sociologists, and other social scientists have a role in altering destructive human behavior. Both George Howard and Stuart Oskamp have identified the problems and proposed several ideas on how psychologists can play an important role in designing non-destructive human behavior.

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing the human race and it's ability to sustain itself. It is important to discuss human behavior that can contribute to climate change, as well as the psychological drivers of these behaviors. For instance,…… [Read More]

References

Oskamp, Stuart. (2000). Psychological Contributions to Achieving an Ecologically Sustainable Future for Humanity. Journal of Social Issues, 56 (3), 373-390. Retrieved from http://74.125.155.132/scholar?q=cache:fELgfd3ftmMJ:scholar.google.com/&hl=

en&as_sdt=0,14&as_ylo=1999

Oskamp, Stuart. (2002) Environmentally Responsible Behavior: Teaching and Promoting It Effectively. Analysis of Social Issues and Public Policy, 2(1), 173-182. Retrieved from http://www.asap-spssi.org/pdf/asap034.pdf

Swim, Janet., Howard, George, et al. (2010) A Report by the American Psychological Association's Task Force on the Interface Between Psychology and Global Climate Change. American Psychological Association. Retrieved from  http://www.apa.org/science/about/publications/climate-change.pdf
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Global Systems Vitousek Et Al Issues Vitousek

Words: 670 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24510885

Global Systems

Vitousek, et al. Issues

Vitousek says the major sources of land transformation are pastureland, agriculture, and urban industrial activity. Agriculture (fisheries, artificial environments, row-crops) are high on the list of land transformation, urban industrial activity medium, and pure pastureland low, depending on human involvement.

Humans alter the oceans in many ways, although some are not easy to quantify. Population centers are concentrated near coastal areas and coastal wetlands are also altered. Fishing alters the ecology of the oceans by focusing on the top predators and throwing the system out of balance. Pollutants and other man-made activities cause algal blooms that are toxic to the ecology of the oceans as well. It is the relationship between the different parts of the food chain that are most effected by human involvement.

Part 3 -- The earth can be viewed as a system concept, with the forests the lungs, the waters…… [Read More]

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Global Communications Decide on a

Words: 543 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44240174



Gannon's series of arguments highlight the major variations in how the Japanese and Koreans perceive time, the role of masculinity in their cultures, the need for self-discipline or not to be aligned with nature (as the Japanese do) and the vastly different approaches to individualism and uncertainty avoidance.

The Japanese see time, and for that matter, their existence, as needing to be disciplined and aligned with natural elements. There is perfection in discipline that allows individuals to align with nature first and secondly with their group and societal norms. According to Gannon starting in the 7th century, Japanese political values stressed the need for group conformity over individualism, and those values continue today throughout the many cultural interactions that this nation has with global trading partners. Korean cultural values stress group consensus and much less of a focus on masculinity index as part of Hofstede, G. And Bond, M. (1988)…… [Read More]

References

Franke, R., Hofstede, G., and Bond, M. (1991). Cultural roots of economic performance: a research note. Strategic Management Journal, 12, 165-173.

Hofstede, G. And Bond, M. (1988). The Confucius connection: From cultural roots to economic growth. Organizational Dynamics, 16(4), 4-21.
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War and Effects the War

Words: 2490 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43569302

Manufacturers are the most affected as they have to absorb the transportation costs borne by the transporters. This often results in a price hike which lowers profits. Companies who have to cut their profits lay off staff which affects consumer spending power. These actions hurt the economy in the longer run as it causes inflation and puts pressure on the government to raise wages so that consumers can afford to pay higher prices. Wages are never increased with rising prices so this result in people becoming poorer and it weakens the economy. Unemployment deters people from buying goods and results in lower sales. This causes more layoffs and pushes the economy to go down.

The automobile industry has been the most affected as car sales have slumped due to the increase in oil prices. Consumers are wary of buying SUVs because they consume a lot of fuel. SUVs form a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bilmes, Linda & Stiglitz, Joseph (2006). The Economic Costs of the Iraq War: An Appraisal Three Years After the Beginning of the Conflict, NBER Working Paper No. 12054

Surowiecki, James (2005, May). Oil Change. The New Yorker

Perry, George L. (2001).The War on Terrorism, the World Oil Market and the U.S. Economy, The Brookings Institution

Behravesh, Nariman, (February 2003).Iraq War Scenarios, Global Insight
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Global Branding of Stella Artois

Words: 2037 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42687859

Global randing of Stella Artois

Interbrew's centuries of experience in brewing, beer distribution and sales are all exemplified throughout their global dominance of worldwide beer consumption as presented in the case The Global randing of Stella Artois (eamish, Goerzen, 2012). With an exceptionally high price/Earnings ratio (P/E Ratio) indicating investor confidence in their brand, operations in 80 nations, with the top 10% of markets globally accounting for 86% of sales and 61% of volume production being generated by North America, Interbrew has a solid platform to build their future marketing, selling and product development strategies on. Despite a slow to no-growth level of performance for the global beer markets of just 1 to 2%, investor confidence continues for Interbrew and their performance over the time period of the case study, further signaling the strength of their operations and strategy execution (Marinov, Marinova, 1998). Interbrew faces the challenge of profitably growing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beamish, P.W., & Goerzen, A. (2012). Global branding of Stella Artois. (). London: Ivey Management Services, a division of Richard Ivey School of Business.

Dezutter, B. (1997). Experiences of investing in Eastern Europe: A study of a multinational brewing company. European Business Review, 97(3), 139-144.

Hanon, B. (1996). The path to competitiveness: Strategies for investment in central Europe. Columbia Journal of World Business, 31(2), 76-85.

Hede, A., & Watne, T. (2013). Leveraging the human side of the brand using a sense of place: Case studies of craft breweries. Journal of Marketing Management, 29(1-2), 207.
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Global Business Current Business Events

Words: 2292 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59960641

The lack of process orchestration shows that IBM is failing to understand and manage the bargaining power of suppliers effectively. The core requirements of the project center on a series of healthcare professionals who taken together are the stakeholders of a complex payroll processing system (Paull, 2013). The requirements from a project management standpoint is to concentrate on the bargaining power of suppliers as system integration partners and create a unified project plan that can successfully meet multiple stakeholder needs. Making this more difficult than other implementations is the bargaining power of buyers, who also are requiring that IBM construct a system they can quickly use to solve complex supply chain, procurement and strategic sourcing challenges as can be inferred from the article (Paull, 2013).

IBM has also allowed for a greater level of threat from new market entrants as well, through the ineffective management of stakeholder requirements. What's obvious…… [Read More]

References

Ball, L.D. 2000, "IT education success strategies for change management," Information Systems Management, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 74-77.

By, B.P. 2013, "Michael Dell Offered Lower Price for His Shares to Make Dell Deal Work," LBO Wire, .

Fickenscher, K. & Bakerman, M. 2011, "Change Management in Health Care it," Physician Executive, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 64-7.

Gunasekaran, a. & Ngai, E.W.T. 2005, "Build-to-order supply chain management: a literature review and framework for development," Journal of Operations Management, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 423-451.
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Global Politics and Economy Late 20th and

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32286190

Global Politics and Economy:

Late 20th and Early 21st Centuries

The world politics and economy of the late twentieth century were highlighted by the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, the promise of a 'new world order' and the rise of 'globalization.' These developments were accompanied by a worldwide trend of increasing democracy, trade liberalization and booming economies. The start of the twenty-first century, on the other hand, has seen the emergence of the so-called 'clash of civilizations' and the long drawn out 'fight against terrorism' with the inevitable slump in global economies. In this essay we shall briefly discuss the major trends of the global politics and economy in this tumultuous period of world history.

Collapse of Communism

The 'Cold ar' period involving intense political and economic rivalry between the two superpowers, the U.S.A. And the Soviet Union, lasted from the end of orld ar…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cold War." Article in Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia Deluxe, 2000. CD-ROM Version.

Fukuyama, Francis. "Their Target: The Modern World." Pp. 54-59. Newsweek International: Special Davos Edition, December 2001-February 2002

World History
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Global Social Economic Perspectives Global

Words: 2927 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12766737



Those countries who have developed their own WMD programs and have not signed various non-proliferation agreements, highlights this hypocrisy that is existing in the international community. Where, no one is willing to force new countries that develop their own WMD programs to commit to such standards. This is problematic, because it telling the world that those countries not committing to various non-proliferation efforts, can maintain their programs (in secrecy) despite the international standard that is in place. At which point, other nations will seek to start their own WMD programs, as they see this as a double standard. Where, you are not supposed to have these weapons, yet once you do they may not apply.

When you combine this with the fact, that those countries that have not signed various international accords are also not making such disclosures to the IAEA; will more than likely be inclined to pass this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cimbala, S. (2005). Nuclear Weapons and Strategy. New York, NY: Routledge.

Gardner, H. (2007). Risks of Nuclear Proliferation. American Global Strategy and the War on Terrorism. (pp. 81 -94) Aldershot, UA: Ashgate.

Heng, Y. (2009). The Proliferation Security Initiative. Risk, Global Governance and Security. (pp. 87 -- 95). New York, NY: Routledge.

Lia, B. (2004). Weapons of Mass Destruction. Globalization and the Future of Terrorism. (pp. 39 -- 48). New York, NY: Routeledge.
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Global Socioeconomic Perspectives the Issue

Words: 1209 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55091806

One also has to question the 'rationality 'of these criteria in the light of the severity of the possible repercussions and diplomatic fallout.

The most acceptable criterion which could justify the use of force in intervention is when the freedom of the state of the safety of its citizens comes under real and tangible threat. However, what is much more questionable are other criteria which are vague and possibly ethically suspect. For example, the view of theorists like Clausewitz that forceful intervention is a tool used by the states to achieve certain political objectives:"….war was merely one means states might employ to achieve objectives set by political authorities" ( Viotti and Kauppi, 2009, chapter 7).

The above perspective, in my point-of-view, is unacceptable as a true criterion for the intervention by force. The reason for the rejection of this criterion is not only on ethical grounds but also refers to…… [Read More]

References

Brown, B.S. (2000). Humanitarian Intervention at a Crossroads. William and Mary Law Review, 41(5), 1683. Retrieved June 23, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001761450

Hillen H. (1996) American Military Intervention: A User's Guide. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/Research/Reports/1996/05/BG1079nbsp-American-Military-Intervention-a-Users-Guide

Johnson J. Which Criteria Should the President Use to Decide on Armed Intervention?

Retrieved from  http://gotmine9.blogspot.com/2008/05/which-criteria-should-president-use-to.html
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Global Wine Wars Since the

Words: 842 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38077017

A good example of this can be seen with the constant declines in consumption since 1966. This is important, because it shows how despite an implosion in demand, many producers felt that their underlying business model would overcome these issues. (artlett)

How New World Growers were able to pose a substantial Threat?

New world growers were able to pose a major threat by using some the latest techniques to address the underlying problems. This can be seen through VRINE analysis, as: the lower price would represent value, the unique taste showing rarity, the same kind of wines as old world producers highlighting imitations, the growth in other regions of world signaling no sustainability and the expansion into new markets showing explore ability. These different elements are important, because they are highlighting how new world producers were able to create a shift in consumer tastes (posing a substantial threat). (artlett)

How…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bartlett, Christopher. (2003)." Global Wine Wars." Harvard Business School, 21 July 2003. Print.

MLA Format. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
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War in Afghanistan the Foundational

Words: 2727 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36921389

(NYT)

Meanwhile the Soviets and its Afganistan government forces brace for the complete deterioration of the nation

Soviet newspapers report that some Afghan army units have begun looting their strongholds and abandoning them to guerrillas. (VOA)the last Soviet troops fly out of Kabul, ending a nine-year occupation of Afghanistan ahead of schedule. Moslem rebels launch rocket attacks on Kabul hours before the final withdrawal. (BBC)

The value of the early assumptions proved very real, though the soviet controlled government was able to hold the nation until 1992, despite many rebel attempts to take over the nation, and especially Kabul. Again on February 16th the U.S. pledges to continue to support the rebels, stating that the ultimate goal of the support is, "...Afghan self-determination. Secretary of State James Baker says the Soviets should assist in the reconstruction of Afghanistan. (NYT)"

Defections of government troops to rebel forces continues, unabated. In one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chipman, Don. "Air Power and the Battle for Mazar-E Sharif." Air Power History 50, no. 1 (2003): 34.

Corwin, Phillip. Doomed in Afghanistan: A UN Officer's Memoir of the Fall of Kabul and Najibullah's Failed Escape, 1992. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2003.

Edwards, David B. Before Taliban: Genealogies of the Afghan Jihad. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002.

Rogers, Tom. The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan: Analysis and Chronology. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992.
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War and Public Administration War

Words: 3482 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84932314

So, even in such situations as when the countryside has also been hit by war, the local administrators are much more likely to be able to function productively as they are fundamentally closer to the need and have strong community ties and possible a strong desire for social order but more importantly for the meeting of the local publics' needs.

The importance of establishing a public administration theoretical framework that prioritizes citizenship over consumerism, in a society where so much of the citizenry relies on public services is foundational to social order and to mitigating the change that has occurred as a result of war. There is no one right answer to all the functional changes to public administration, with regard to war as the many facets of war also create many facets of change in public administration. The level of degradation to physical and psychological networks must be analyzed…… [Read More]

References

Boleman, L., & Deal, T. (2003). Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice and Leadership. Third Ed. . San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bruck, T. (1997). Macroeconomic Effects of the War in Mozambique. QEH Working Paper Series QEHWPS11, 1-63.

Chopra, J., & Hohe, T. (2004). Participatory Intervention. Global Governance, 10-27.

Denhart, J., & Denhardt, R.B. (2007). The New Public Service. Revised Edition. Armonk, NY:: M.E. Sharpe.
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War of the Worlds' Influence

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40726562

However, it is the cable technician and a lone previously un-promotable Air Force pilot, flying a recovered alien ship, and downloading a computer virus into the mother ship that spells the ultimate downfall of the aliens and saves mankind.

The War of the Worlds' Influence on Independence Day:

Anyone who has watched these two movies can draw immediate similarities. Both are built around the premise that aliens have come to invade Earth, yet, in the end, mankind survives. The most critical comparison of the two movies, faults Independence Day for figuratively stealing the ending from War of the Worlds. Of course in Independence Day the "virus" that kills of the aliens is electronic and not microbial, but the symbolism is simply too obvious.

Just as in War of the Worlds, Independence Day has the nations uniting under the common threat. No longer are national boundaries of relevance, when the fate…… [Read More]

References

Hunt, KC. Plot Summary for War of the Worlds (1953). 2004. Internet Movie Database.  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0046534/plotsummary .

Molin, Gustaf. Plot Summary for Independence Day (1996). 2004. Internet Movie Database. November 9, 2004  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116629/plotsummary .

The War of the Worlds (1953 Movie). 24 Sept 2004. Wikipedia.org. November 9, 2004 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War_of_the_Worlds_%281953_movie%29.

Lopez
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Global Market Development the Intent

Words: 1350 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27598661

This has been further strengthened by Optical Brightening Agents, which is the key driver of new adoption of detergents throughout all regions of India and Pakistan.

Suppliers have relatively complex supply chains to get access to several different types of chemicals and borax needed to sell the wide variety of products the chain providers.

Highly dependent on the price of borax and other whitening products, which is used in many Proctor and Gamble products. Detergent market growth in India is predicted to be 6 to 8% according to many industry sources.

Potential Entrants

Proctor & Gamble, Lever Brothers, and brands from Europe are continually working on Joint Ventures to move into the Indian and Pakistani markets. Of these, Proctor and Gamble has the majority of the existing market share, with approximately 10% of the total Indian market.

There is a wide variety of smaller and lesser-known competitors throughout the two…… [Read More]

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Global Business Strategies Strategy of

Words: 963 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69015139

The problem with this strategy was that it determined higher indirect costs that the company did not take into consideration when making this decision.

c) General Motors is one of the most successful U.S. companies. But GM was forced to modify its strategy because the global competition conditions. This is mostly the case of Toyota, which developed into an important competitor of GM on the European, U.S., and Asian market. The numerous advantages of Toyota and its products and services include: lower prices, better supply chain management that is based on Japanese methods, and higher quality management (Klum, 2011).

These advantages helped Toyota become the leader of the Asian market. This helped the company also improve its international position. In addition to this, General Motors' sales and profits significantly reduced. Therefore, the company had to modify its strategy in order to reduce its costs. The company's managers considered that this…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. The GM's Consolidated Strategy and Enhanced Approach (2011). The Global Mechanism. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from http://global-mechanism.org/about-us/strategyand-approach.

2. Muller, J. (2009). GM's Global Strategy in Doubt. Forbes Magazine. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from  http://www.forbes.com /forbes/2009/0622/autos-foreign-aide-gm-global-strategy-in-doubt.html.

3. Klum, E. (2011). General Motors Growth Strategy. Retrieved September 24, 2011 from  http://www.streetdirectory.com/travel_guide/51055/cars/general_motors_growth_strategy.html .
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War on AIDS

Words: 1577 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46254225

ar on AIDS

Affordable retroviral drugs now!

Fighting the 'good fight' against AIDS in Africa

It's one of the most long-standing theoretical ethical debates: you know someone is dying, and will die if they do not get a certain kind of medicine. However, the medicine is prohibitively expensive. Do you steal this all-important medication? Or do you allow the person to wither and die, because stealing is wrong -- or rather, because the pharmaceutical companies 'deserve' to make a profit? Of course, you ensure that the individual has the medication, ideally by pressuring the store or company to give you the medicine for free. But although this moral impulse may seem like a 'no brainer' on an individual level, on a mass level, people are still dying in record numbers from AIDS in Africa, in a way that would be unacceptable, if it took place in the so-called developing world.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Colebunders R. et al. (Oct 2005). "Free Antiretrovirals Must Not Be Restricted Only to Treatment-Naive Patients." PLoS Medicine. 2(10). Retrieved 14 Feb 2008 at http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.0020276

Global Access to HIV Therapy Tripled in Past Two Years, But Significant Challenges

Remain." (2007). WHO: World Health Organization Retrieved 14 Feb 2008 at http://www.who.int/hiv/mediacentre/news57/en/index.html

Miller, Charles & Kenneth Goldman. "Merck, AIDS, and Africa." (23 Oct 2003).
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War Isolation and English Is

Words: 1327 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24634852

In 1066, illiam the Conqueror and his army of Normans established themselves as the dominant power in Britain, and the form of French they brought with them quickly became the language of the powerful classes in British society, while the lower classes still spoke English (English Club, 3). For the second time in just over five-hundred years, a major conquest of the Isle of Britain was conducted by an invading tribe with a foreign tongue. This time, however, the existing language and people were not replaced, but instead the Latin influence of the Norman tongue began to seep into English, creating the first elements of a "bastard" tongue (Anglik.net, 6). ords such as "beef" and "cow" illustrate how the class difference that existed at first between speaker of the Norman and Anglo-Saxon languages eventually resulted in a language with a greater diversity of words than any other -- cow has…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglik.net. "A Brief History of the English Language." Accessed 1 February 2009.  http://www.anglik.net/englishlanguagehistory.htm 

Baugh, Albert C. And Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language. New York: Prentice Hall, 2001.

English Club.com. "History of the English Language." Accessed 31 January 2009. http://www.englishclub.com/english-language-history.htm

Marsh, George P. The Origin and History of the English Language. New York: Scribner, 1896.
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Global Social Economic Perspective Global

Words: 1087 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35188312

Where, many can be able to acquire and construct such materials that can be purchased on the black market. As a result, this increases the odds that these types of weapons will be used in the future, to create a super terrorist attack. This is significant, because it can be used to corroborate other research on terrorists seeking to acquire and use WMDs. Where, they could be purchased on the black market or one of the state sponsors of terrorism could pass this material to these groups. (Campbell, 1997, 24 -- 50)

usch, N. (2008). Force, Preemption and WMDs. Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. (pp. 156 -- 175). Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press.

In this piece of literature, the author discusses how there are confusing international standards for dealing with WMD's and how to control them. This is because approaching the problem has been difficult. Where, some nations try…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Busch, N. (2008). Force, Preemption and WMDs. Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. (pp. 156 -- 175) Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press.

Campbell, J. (1997). Weapons of Mass Destruction and Terrorism. Terrorism and Political Violence 9 (2), 24 -- 50.

Kan, S. (2009). China and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Congressional Research Service. http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/crs/rl31555.pdf

Krauthammer, Charles. (1991). The Unipolar Movement. Foreign Affairs 71 (1), 23 -- 33
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Global Ebusiness Marketing Discussion of

Words: 5239 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98778819

You need a stable foothold and insight into the dynamics of the marketplace from which to be able to peer effectively into the future.... Marketing research can provide real value by helping to provide the radar that will alert the enterprise to perils -- and opportunities -- ahead" (Duboff & Spaeth 2000, pp. 3-13). Proponents of market research maintain that these activities help to ensure that companies remain consumer-orientated. According to Fuglsang and Sundbo (2002), the value of market research can depend on what type of service or product is involved, and what destination country is intended for export purposes. "In practice," they advise, "this means that new products are more successful if they are designed to satisfy a perceived need than if they are designed simply to take advantage of a new technology. The approach taken by many companies with regard to market research is that if sufficient research…… [Read More]

References

Dictionary of Business. 1996. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Brewer, Thomas L. And Alan M. Rugman. 2001. The Oxford Handbook of International Business. New York: Oxford University Press.

Drummond, Lisa B.W. And Mandy Thomas (Eds). Consuming Urban Culture in Contemporary Vietnam. New York: Routledge.

Duboff, Robert and Jim Spaeth. 2000. Market Research Matters: Tools and Techniques for Aligning Your Business. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
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Global Business Culture Analysis of

Words: 4614 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6188631

There are also some words that are used, which do not translate into English such as privacy. This is because the cultural traditions of Russia do not understand such concepts, which makes translating certain ideas more challenging. (Richmond, 2009, pp. 109 -- 117)

1.3.1: Russian

Russian is a Slavic language that has close ties to all of the different European languages including: English and German. This means that many of the root words are similar to what is used in the common languages spoken throughout the West. However, as far as the alphabet is concerned, the language will utilize what is known as the Cyrillic alphabet. This is different from Western languages, as each of 32 different symbols will represent particular roots of certain words. When reading the language and learning Russian, the basic alphabet will help foreign business executives to navigate their way around. With the alphabet is pronounced…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andresen, F. (2007). Walking on Ice. Denver, CO: Outskirts Press.

Ayios, A. (2004). East West Relationships in Russia. Trust and Western Russian Business Relationships. (pp. 156 -- 180). Burlington, VT: Ashgate.

Horton, P. (2006). Religion. Russia and Belarus. (pp. 77 -- 83). Melbourne: Lonely Planet Publications.

Jones, A. (1994). Education and Society in the New Russia. Armonk, NY: ME Sharpe.
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War for Resources Chris Hedges

Words: 3478 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90746667

Private armies and warlords support themselves with these crops -- an instance of exploiting (in fact, abusing) the environment to pay for war (Global esources, 2004).

Use of esources to Finance Conflict

Forest products are also often used to pay for conflicts. Timber requires little investment and can be converted to cash more cheaply than oil, which requires technology. Control over timber resources can shift the balance of power during a conflict and affect how long the conflict lasts. Underfunded armies, military, police, and rebel forces often finance themselves by cutting trees. Conflicts in Cambodia, Burma and Liberia have been funded with timber, and in each of those countries the wood produced more than 100 million dollars per year (Global esources, 2004).

Incompatible Uses Leading to Conflict

Use or misuse of resources can be very profitable on one hand but ruinous to another. For example, jurisdictional conflicts have heated up…… [Read More]

References

Breaking the habit (2004). The Nation (Feb 9), 178 (5), 11-14.

Brown, V.J. (2004). Battle scars: Global conflicts and environmental health. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112 (17), 994-1003.

Coles, C. (2004). Resources for peace. The Futurist (Jan/Feb), 38 (1) 6.

Conserving the Peace: Resources, Livelihoods, and Security (2002). IUCN/IISD E&S Task Force. Johannesburg: World Summit on Sustainable Development.
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War Rational Choice Realism

Words: 1507 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66607944

ar is a necessary and inevitable. The question of whether it is justified is dependent on the conditions of each war individually, but the necessity and inevitability of armed conflict among human societies has been demonstrated consistently throughout history. Davidson and Lytle (1992) provide a strong argument in favor of this position with their description of the conditions surrounding the detonation of the atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki to bring an end to the Second orld ar.

Davidson and Lytle argue that the reason for these bombings was not as much to end the war with the Japanese but rather to send a message to the Soviet Union. At the time, the U.S.S.R. was also pursuing nuclear weapons technology. In the wake of the end of the war in Europe, that continent had been effectively been divided between the United States and its allies in the est and Stalin's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crossman, Ashley (2014). Rational choice theory. About.com. Retrieved May 25, 2014 from http://sociology.about.com/od/Sociological-Theory/a/Rational-Choice-Theory.htm

Davidson, James & Mark Lytle. The decision to drop the bomb. After the fact: The Art of Historical Detection. McGraw-Hill.

Korab-Karpowicz, Julie. (2013). Political realism in international relations. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved May 25, 2014 from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/realism-international-relations/
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Soviet-Afgan War Conflict Analysis Focus

Words: 5116 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10933340

(Harvey, 2003) the suspicion of the United States of the "Soviet Expansionist tendencies" had increased by the 1970s and Harvey states as well that "The pervasive mentality of Washington officials during these years was dominated by the communist domino theory which led many Washington politicians to believe that the Soviet Union sought to take over the entire world." (2003) the United States had always received a safeguard provided by the shah for their Middle East interest of oil and it was this that resulted in the United States perceiving the Soviet-Afghanistan relations as a "considerable threat...before 1979." (Harvey, 2003)

Harvey reports that while Department of State records from the early 1970s report that the United States was indifferent to the relationship that was developing between the Soviet Union and Afghanistan that the truth is that "...Recently declassified ntelligence reports also reveal that the "official history record is false."

[26] Contrary…… [Read More]

Isby, David C. (1999) War in a Distant Country. New York: Arms and Armour Press, 1989. Rashid, Ahmed (2000) Taliban. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000.

Terrorism Project. (2001) "Lessons from History: U.S. Policy Towards Afghanistan, 1978-2001." 5 October 2001. Online available at; .

United States Department of State (1976) Annual Policy Assessment, March 9, 1976.
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Iraqi War Operation Iraqi Freedom

Words: 3405 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62190091

687).

Many reasons for the war were offered by both the United States and British governments at various times. In the months leading up to the war, there were a plethora of reasons offered that made it difficult to rationalize and understand exactly why the war was necessary. The argument regarding weapons of mass destruction was one of the most argued points; however, there was much debate as to whether these alleged weapons of mass destruction even existed (Iraq Survey Group 2004). Another point of contention with the war in Iraq was whether or not there were right intentions. According to many scholars and lay persons, reiterated by Fishar and Biggar, there was serious opposition because the disarmament of Iraq seemed only the beginning of a larger agency established by the U.S., UK and their allies. Reasonable belief that weapons of mass destruction existed, for many, was not enough to…… [Read More]

Works cited

American Unbound: the Bush Revolution in foreign policy. Washington DC. Web. 2003.

Biggar, N. "Invading Iraq: what are the morals of the story?" International Affairs, 87.1

(2011): p. 29-30.

Davies, N. Blood on our hands: the American invasion and destruction of Iraq. Web. 2010.
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Ethics of War

Words: 2010 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43083612

Ethics of ar: Justified and Unjustified ar

hen countries launch hostile military actions against other nations to the point where war occurs, the belligerents will inevitably have fundamentally opposing views concerning the legitimacy of the conflict and each opposing side will offer its poignant justification for its respective moral, legal and political positions regarding the conflict. In many cases, all belligerents in a war may have equally compelling just causes, and these causes can change from just to unjust even as the war is being fought. Indeed, scarcity of resources is frequently at the heart of many wars, but virtually all wars throughout history have also been justified on the basis of both sound and spurious rationales, the veracity of which depends on who is asking and who is being asked, questions that quickly become heated when religious reasons are included in the mix. To get at the heart of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexandrov, Stanimir A. (1997, January 1). "Self-Defense against the Use of Force in International Law." The George Washington Journal of International Law and Economics 30(2/3): 605-610.

Dagi, Ihsan. (2013, Winter). "Editor's Note." Insight Turkey 15(1): 4-5.

Elshtain, Jean Bethke. (2005, October). "Against the New Utopianism: Response to 'Against the New Internationalism.' Ethics & International Affairs 19(2): 91-93.

Nardin, Terry. (2002, April). "The Moral Basis of Humanitarian Intervention." Ethics & International Affairs 16(1): 57-63.
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WWI and WWII Sonar in Naval Warfare

Words: 4448 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19694347

Sonar esearch and Naval Warfare: 1914-1954

During both World War I and World War II, there were a number of informational tactics used by the Navy in order to gain ground on enemy troops. One of those was sonar research, because it provided them with knowledge they would not have otherwise had (Hackmann, 1984). Sonar is not perfect, but a great deal of work has gone into it since its creation, and that has helped it to become a more valuable tool for Naval operations. Sonar is used for navigation, but also for communication and the detection of objects, primarily underwater (Urick, 1983). There are two types of sonar: passive and active. In active sonar, pings are sent out to search for other objects (Hackmann, 1984). Passive sonar does not send out a signal, but only listens for the pings and signals of others (Hackmann, 1984). Both have their place,…… [Read More]

References

Abbatiello, J. (2005). Anti-submarine warfare in World War I: British Naval aviation and the defeat of the U-boats. NY: Routledge.

Adamthwaite, A.P. (1992). The making of the Second World War. New York: Routledge.

Barber, J., & Harrison, M. (2006). Patriotic war, 1941 -- 1945. In Ronald Grigor Suny, ed. The Cambridge History of Russia, Volume III: The Twentieth Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hackmann, W. (1984). Seek & Strike: Sonar, anti-submarine warfare and the Royal Navy 1914-54. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office.
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Do Global Problems Require Solutions by Global Agencies

Words: 707 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76299903

Global Problems equire Solutions by Global Agencies? If So, Which?

Today, the world is rife with problems, but the historical record suggests that it always has been. In sharp contrast to the past, though, modern global problems are truly enormous in terms of their diversity and scope. While emerging economic powerhouses such as China, India, Brazil, Indonesia and Malaysia are reaping the benefits of an increasingly globalized marketplace, the demand for food and fuel has skyrocketed along with their prices. Competition over scarce resources has always been a source of conflict, but current signs indicate that the competition for resources in the future will become truly fierce because current supplies of fossil fuels are being depleted at an increasingly faster rate. In this environment, regional conflicts and even global war are potential outcomes that will require global solutions. To determine which global agencies will play a role in implementing and…… [Read More]

References

Ki-Moon, B. (2011, March 11). Remarks to the UN General Assembly. United Nations.

Retrieved from http://www.un.org/apps/news/infocusRel.asp?infocusID=137&

Body=food+crisis&Body1=.

Searchinger, T. (2011, July). A quick fix to the food crisis. Scientific American, 305(1), 14.
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Military Strategy in Korean and Vietnam Wars

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11150054

Military Strategy in Korean and Vietnam Wars

There have been numerous wars in the history of the United States. Some of the critical wars in the history of the United States include the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Prior to venturing into the Vietnam War, United States had participated in the Korean War. The case of Korean War proves to be a success because of the implementation of accurate and extensive strategies. Ten years after the success in the Korean War, the United States faced a similar situation, but could not recognize the same success as in the case of the previous war. One of the essential factors in the failure in relation to the Vietnam War was lack of appropriate military strategies. This research paper focuses on the illustration of reasons behind the success and failure with reference to Korean and Vietnam Wars respectively.

Military Strategy in Korea War

One…… [Read More]

References

Mehta, Harish C. 2012. "Fighting, Negotiating, and Laughing: The Use of Humour in the Vietnam War." Historian 74, no. 4: 743-788.

Schell, Jonathan. 2013. "The Real Vietnam War." Nation 296, no. 5: 20-24.

Hee Kyung, Suh. 2012. "War and Justice: Just Cause of the Korean War." Korea Journal 52,

no. 2: 5-29.
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Economic Means of War

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90674815

World War II -- Economic Means of War

re-War America was ill-prepared for the logistics of War. Upon entering the War, the United States was faced with a complex situation in which it had to coordinate the logistics of global war among its own forces and in conjunction with Allied forces. Through the efforts of notable military leaders, the United States capably mastered logistics for success in both the European and acific Theaters.

World War II - Economic Means of War for the United States

rior to the United States' entry into World War II, the "window to the west" was closed due to American isolationism and economic crisis during the Depression.[footnoteRef:1] There were two competing forces in pre-war America: those who believed America should intervene in the European war vs. The "America First Committee" that believed America's best pre-War interests were served by doing precisely nothing and that Germany's…… [Read More]

Prior to the United States' entry into World War II, the "window to the west" was closed due to American isolationism and economic crisis during the Depression.[footnoteRef:1] There were two competing forces in pre-war America: those who believed America should intervene in the European war vs. The "America First Committee" that believed America's best pre-War interests were served by doing precisely nothing and that Germany's victory would be advantageous or, at worst, have little effect on the United States.[footnoteRef:2] Despite America's pre-war isolationism, President Roosevelt attempted a nonpartisan reversal of America's neutrality and engagement in meaningful logistics.[footnoteRef:3] By Roosevelt's promise in December 1940, America became the "arsenal of democracy" for Allied forces through uncoordinated, temporary contracts, eventually leading to the "Lend Lease Act," devoting a large portion of America's industry to Great Britain's war effort.[footnoteRef:4] Meanwhile, America itself was woefully unprepared for War: in 1941, the country's entire military expenditure totaled only 4% of the amount spent from 1942 -- 1945.[footnoteRef:5] In addition, at the start of the War, America had essentially no air force and only 190,000 men in the army, with no armies, corps or divisions.[footnoteRef:6] [1: Richard Overy, Why the Allies Won (New York, NY W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1997), p. 329.] [2: Gerhard L. Weinberg, A World at Arms: A Global History of World War II (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1995), p.85.] [3: Ibid., pp. 84-5.] [4: John Keegan, The Battle for History: Re-Fighting World War II (New York, NY: First Vintage Books Edition, 1996), p. 54.] [5: Overy, p. 191.] [6: Weinberg, p. 87.]

America's War Department handled logistics[footnoteRef:7] and President Roosevelt's Army Chief-of-Staff, General George Marshall, devoted a great deal of his energy to logistics, both before and during the War.[footnoteRef:8] Excelling at quiet and precise logistics, Marshall was determined to avoid the logistical failures of World War I, became "indispensable" to Roosevelt and was deemed a "manager in uniform."[footnoteRef:9] This proved to be the optimal appointment, as World War II was essentially a global war of logistics for the United States, requiring complex, painstaking preparation and coordination with allied forces in both the Pacific and European Theaters to supply and otherwise support American and Allied forces. In addition, at times there were competing demands for landing craft, shipping and support in both Theaters. Entering the War at a relatively late date, America conducted logistics in coordination with Allies rather than by a lone committee.[footnoteRef:10] [7: Ibid., p. 925.] [8: Overy, p. 273.] [9: Ibid., pp. 273-4.] [10: Overy, p. 273.]

In the Pacific Theater, the United States had to manufacture and effectively transfer supplies for naval warfare, air warfare and amphibious warfare.[footnoteRef:11] Admiral Chester Nimitz was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Ocean Area[footnoteRef:12] and General Douglas MacArthur was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Southwest Pacific.[footnoteRef:13] America did possess an "Orange Plan" prior to WWII for a Pacific Ocean war with the Japanese[footnoteRef:14]; however, actual war in Pacific Theater war was complicated by initial ignorance about logistics
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Arab-Israeli Wars Palestinian and Arab

Words: 1837 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9179974

This resulted in various destroyed relations for Israel as it offered sympathy for the Palestinian people and their fight not necessarily for independence, but most of all for a fair treatment from Israel. Even if it signed the Camp David Agreements in 1978 and committed to creating the framework for withdrawing from the occupied territories, Israel did not follow through and continues to do so today as well.

Looking at the entire situation from the Israeli perspective, its strategy of eliminating its enemies and putting them under control seems like a good approach. As it did in 1982 when it invaded Lebanon to destroy the South Lebanese Palestinian attackers or in its numerous misfired or intentionally fired missiles in refugee camps, Israel succeeded in becoming the strongest military force in the region.

Having in view the latest developments in the Arab world, it is hard to predict what will be…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alteras, A. (1993) Eisenhower and Israel: U.S.-Israeli Relations 1953-1960 Florida: University Press of Florida

Calvocoressi, P. (2009) World Politics since 1945 Essex: Pearson Education Limited

Nye, J. (2002) Understanding International Conflicts: An Introduction to Theory and History Longman Classics Series

Oren, M. (2002) Six Days of War: June 1967 and the making of the modern Middle East New York: Oxford University Press
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Soviet and American Military Operations During the War in Afghanistan

Words: 1583 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45712985

Soviet-Afghanistan War that took place between 1979 and 1988. The writer explores the tactics used by the Soviet Small Unit operations and discusses why the attempts were not successful. There were six sources used to complete this paper.

Many people refer to the war between the Soviet Union and Afghanistan as the ussian Viet Nam. The reason that this nickname has been attached to this war is because it was in many ways similar to the Viet Nam conflict with the United States. In that situation the United States was a monstrous force to be reckoned with compared to the armed service abilities of Viet Nam. In the Soviet Afghanistan war it was similar in that ussia was a monster in size when compared to Afghanistan. In each case the smaller nation dug in their heels and refused to be intimidated by the larger nation. In the Afghanistan war with…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

New U.S. Ambassador Seeks to Accelerate Afghan Reconstruction and Security

Khalilzad says country is one of Bush's top two foreign policy priorities http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english& y=2003& m=November& x=20031120161549namfuaks0.8437158& t=xarchives/xarchitem.html& PHPSESSID=1647e3012d8aa4f099e44d94ab442e60

Feb. 15, 2003

USSR's war in Afghanistan was a mistake - Gorbachev