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Tragedy in the Oedipus Trilogy Sophocles Is

Words: 1937 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41533426

Tragedy in the Oedipus Trilogy

Sophocles is considered to be one of the greatest Greek dramatists, and remains among the most renowned playwrights even today. The Greek tragedy is one of the most influential genres of literary and theatrical history on the modern drama and theatre. The theatre of ancient Greece was inspired by the worship of Dionysus, and the performance of plays was considered to be a religious experience for both the actors and the audience. ecause of this, the intensity of the Greek theatre was very strong, and the degree to which the plays were taken seriously as a means of influencing and interpreting life was also very high. According to Aristotle, the philosopher credited with creating the definition of a tragedy, "Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

McManus, Barbara. "Outline of Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy in the POETICS." CLS 267 Topics. November 1999.  http://www.cnr.edu/home/bmcmanus/poetics.html 

McManus, Barbara. "Unity of Actionn in Oedipus the King." CLS 267 Topics. November 1999.  http://www.cnr.edu/home/bmcmanus/oedipusplot.html 

Morissey, Christopher. "Oedipus the Cliche: Aristotle on Tragic Form and Content." Anthropoetics 9, no. 1. Department of Humanities, Simon Fraser University. Spring/Summer 2003.  http://www.anthropoetics.ucla.edu/ap0901/oedipus.htm 

"Reading Greek Tragedy." University of Washington, Tacoma. 2005.  http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/ctlt/students/resources/someelementsoftragedy.pdf
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Greek and English the Ancient

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56179376

The vengeance of the gods is further underscored by the Chorus who warns that "But if any man comes striding, high and mighty, in all he says and does, no fear of justice, no reverence for the temples of the gods-let a rough doom tear him down, repay his pride, breakneck, ruinous pride!" Oedipus portrays tyranny and the people's greatest blessing becomes their worst curse.

In the last stage, Oedipus is a man who has become humbled with the pain and dejection of knowing the truth of reality as he is forced to admit his tragic destiny by the overwhelming evidence. The writer shows the sudden change in the protagonist's persona when Oedipus condemns himself by saying, "I stand revealed at last -- cursed in my birth, cursed in marriage, cursed in the lives I cut down with these hands!" (1309-1311) Oedipus's complete transformation is demonstrated when he gouged out…… [Read More]

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Tragedy as a Form of

Words: 1047 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56672245

As a king in ancient Greek literature, Oedipus was required to have a dramatically catastrophic fall, while modern literature needs a tragic hero who is an "everyman." But both suffered greatly in their own ways, and in ways that the audience both expected and regarded as essential. But while these two characters were both the central, tragic figure in their respective stories, their differences were a reflection of the role of dramatic tragedy in their societies.

The subject of ancient Greek literature was often the magnificent deeds of the gods and heroes, while everyday life was more often forgotten. As a result, the tragedies presented often had as their main character a great person, sometimes with a major personality flaw, who suffers extreme torments and a mighty plunge from an exalted position. Nothing exemplified this excessive amount of suffering than Oedipus, a man who became a king only to later…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle, S.H. Butcher. "Poetics." The Internet Classic Archive. Web. 8 April 2012.

 http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.html 

Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. London: York, 1998. Print.

Sophocles. "Oedipus the King." The Internet Classic Archive. Web. 9 April 2012.
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Greek Sculpture a Timeline of Greek Sculpture

Words: 1464 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83902479

Greek Sculpture

A Timeline of Greek Sculpture

Polykleitos, Doryphoros (early fourth century BC)

As Paul Johnson (2003) records, this ancient example of Greek classicalism "epitomizes a canon of male beauty embodied in mathematical proportions" (p. 63). Showing the perfection of contraposto, Doryphoros (or the spear-carrier) is a balanced representation of the body's muscles. Polykleitos, a contemporary of Phidias, had his own school of young artists, which carried on into the third century BC. Polykleitos' works are treated on in his own treatise, called "The Canon," which gave explicit attention to symmetry, clarity, and wholeness. The Spear-carrier is one of the best examples of Polykleitos' teaching -- however, this example is a copy of his original, and is held in Naples -- a fitting representation of the art of Greek sculpting.

Praxiteles, Aphrodite of Knidos (mid-fourth century BC)

Praxiteles actually made two statues for Kos -- so the legend goes. One…… [Read More]

Reference List

Agony -- The Famous Group of Laocoon. (n.d.) Old and Sold. Retrieved from  http://www.oldandsold.com/articles26/rome-19.shtml 

Haaren, J. (2000). Famous Men of Greece. Lebanon, TN: Greenleaf Press.

Johnson, P. (2003). Art: A New History. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

The Farnesse Bull. (n.d.) Old and Sold. Retrieved from  http://www.oldandsold.com/articles26/naples-5.shtml
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Greek Concept to Movie Troy

Words: 962 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Film Review Paper #: 64147943

Greek Concept to Movie Troy

Ancient mythology as never ceased to amaze and fascinate its readers and followers. Especially Egyptian and Greek mythology, having followers everywhere; in the current times it has found a new fan, that is the movie making business, with a special interest in Greek mythology. Nothing is better than watching your favorite characters brought up to life and actually see them doing all the things we had previously only imagined them doing. One such captivating movie is 'troy' based on the Greek Trojan war starring Brad Pitt. Various Greek concepts were shed light in this movie, which will be discussed, in relation to the movie.

The first concept is Fate, since in Greek mythology fate does not just happen. The gods make things happen, in their own engineered ways, and interfere to make things happen on their own account. Then there is MOIA, which means that…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Walter Benjamin "The Task of the Translator" vol 1: 1913-1926. Marcus Bullock. Pg. 256-259

Roman Jacobson "The World of Movies, Media and Multimedia: language, history, theory" Pg. 26-266.

James Monaco "How to Read a Film" 3rd edition, Pg. 250-255.
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Greek Artifacts the Civilization of

Words: 1921 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27467730

Also, this carving is quite sentimental in appearance, for it reflects "the solemn pathos of the Greek citizen, much like some of the sculptures found on the pediment of the Parthenon" (Seyffert, 245).

Our last artifact is titled Pair of Armbands with Triton and Tritoness Holding Erotes, made in the Hellenistic period, circa 200 .C.E. These jewelry objects were apparently designed for a woman of high Greek culture, for they are made from solid gold and are fashioned in the shape of two loosely-coiled snakes or serpents. Whomever designed these intricate and beautiful objects realized the special properties of gold, for the woman lucky enough to wear these could easily slip her arms through the loops, due to the malleability of solid gold. The two figures located at the tops of each piece are representations of Triton and Tritoness, most closely associated with the Greek god of the sea Poseidon.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

New Greek and Roman Galleries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Internet. 2007.

Retrieved at  http://www.metmuseum.org/special/greek_roman/images.asp .

Seyffert, Oskar. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Religion, Literature and Art.

New York: Gramercy Books, 1995.
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Euripides' Tragedy of Hippolytus Phaedra as a

Words: 863 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7766578

Euripides' tragedy of "Hippolytus":

Phaedra as a plaything of the gods

Euripides' tragedy of "Hippolytus" is a tragedy of paganism, at least on its surface. The work details the conflict between Hippolytus, the noble son of Theseus who honors the goddess of chastity and the hunt Artemis and his new stepmother Phaedra, who honors Aphrodite above all other goddesses. When Phaedra falls in love with Hippolytus he is repulsed not simply because of the incestuous nature of Phaedra's love but because it dishonors the principles of chastity embodied by his excessive worship of Artemis. The conflict between the two goddesses, translated into human terms, ultimately results in death and destruction for both Hippolytus and Artemis and the misery of Theseus, the father of Hippolytus and the husband of Phaedra. However, there is also a higher symbolic order beyond that a personal conflict between the gods that is being violated, one…… [Read More]

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Female Role Depicted in Greek

Words: 1630 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27914475

In asking him to stay with her and their family, she was practically betraying her country. Demeter cares for the earth in a way that no other gods did. She was actively involved with mortal affairs. However, she also cared for own, her daughter. She does what she feels what she must do in an act of revenge. These women demonstrate the complexity of the female in any era. Even in ancient texts, we see the female figure associated with the typical womanly things such as motherhood and fertility but she is also given characteristics that are strong, powerful, and dangerous. What these myths tell us about the role of the female is that it is constantly changing. The female is complex and while she will always associated with fertility, she should never be relegated to an inferior role. While we often see mythology as wild with fantastical elements, we…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bullfinch, Thomas. Bulfinch's Mythology. New York: Random House Publishing. 1979.

Hesiod. Theogony. Perseus Digital Online Library. Information Retrieved August 7, 2009.

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Death of a Salesman as a Tragedy as Defined by Aristotle

Words: 2818 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76605001

drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Brief overview of the play

Miller's work

Story

Characters

Obstacles

Argument for tragedy

Aristotle's definition

Pro argument for tragedy

Con argument against tragedy

Own conclusions

What the critics say

Death of a Salesman as Tragedy

This paper analyzes the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller. Specifically, it discusses the definition of tragedy by Aristotle, and research if it is correct to label the play as a tragedy.

Death of a Salesman is indeed a tragedy of epic proportions. The drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Arthur Miller wrote Death of a Salesman in 1948,…… [Read More]

References

Adamczewski, Zygmunt. The Tragic Protest. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1963.

Amsden, Robert. "Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy." Ripon College. 2002. 29 Aug. 2005.

<  http://www.ripon.edu/Faculty/Amsdenr/THE231/GreekTheatreFolder/AristotlePage.html#3 

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
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Oedipus Greek Myths and Modern

Words: 826 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 33635402

The fact that most men sublimate this feeling, and instead identify with their father to obtain the maternal figure in the form of another woman, is the reason the Oedipus myth was generated in the first place.

Freud's theory was popular not only 'on the couch' but in literary theory. Ernest Jones suggested that it is the reason Hamlet cannot bring himself to kill his uncle: "Now comes the father's death and the mother's second marriage. The long 'repressed' desire to take his father's place in his mother's affection is stimulated to unconscious activity by the sight of some one usurping this place exactly as he himself had once longed to do… the two recent events, the father's death and the mother's second marriage . . . represented ideas which in Hamlet's unconscious fantasy had for many years been closely associated" (Jones 98-99).

Regardless of the merit of Freud's theory,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dunkle, Roger. The Classical Origins of Western Culture, the Core Studies 1 Study Guide.

Brooklyn College Core Curriculum Series. Brooklyn College, the City University of New York, 1986.

Jones, Ernest. "The Oedipus-Complex as an Explanation of Hamlet's Mystery:

A Study in Motive." The American Journal of Psychology. January, 1910
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The Girl From Samos a Tragic Greek Play

Words: 984 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14253960

Girl From Samos

Act III:

Just to give a background. This passage starts off with Demeas finding out some devastating information. He discovers that his mistress Chrysis' was holding a baby. Believing it to be Chrysis', and kept against his requests, he decides to kick her out. At that time, Moschion moves in and tries to convince him to keep the baby and then starts to push the question of marriage to his mistress. "Nay, wine is mixing and your wedding's going on Incense rises; and Hephaestus laps the victim with his flame" (Meander, 2010, p. 61)

However, before all of this would occur, there would be a great tragic incidence that would change the course of the play "In the midst of a fair voyage, a storm can suddenly appear from nowhere. . ." (Meander, 2010, p. 53 para 4) This quote is basically explaining that there was about…… [Read More]

References

Meander. (2010). Plays and Fragments. Penguin Classics; Reissue edition.
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Greek Crisis Is Opportunity

Words: 903 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Creative Writing Paper #: 8916656

Investors

Corporate Office

Greek Crisis- Opportunity

Board of Directors

The Greek financial crisis is rooted in two decades of profligate spending which has ballooned the country's debt to GDP ratio to 124.9% of GDP in 2010 (The Wall Street Journal.com. May 7, 2010). Coupled with a stagnant economy, the risk of a Greek sovereign default is roiling markets and could cause a contagion across the Eurozone and ultimately the global financial system. Yet, Greece has a unique opportunity to emerge from this crisis stronger and able to compete competitively around the globe as a viable and prospering member of the Euro block. To do so they must embrace a mix of austerity and free market reforms to ensure liquidity and avoid default.

Background

Greece had always been a weaker member of the Eurozone as compared with Germany, France, and Italy accounting for only 2.6% of the GDP of the Euro…… [Read More]

References

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.com. (2011). Economic

Survey of Greece. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.com. Retrieved December 1, 2011 from  http://www.oecd.org/document/28/0,3746,en_2649_34327_48421852_1_1_1_1,00.html 

Roscini, D. Schlefer, J. & Dimitriou, K. April 19, 2011). The Greek Crisis: Tragedy or Opportunity? Harvard Business School. Retrieved December 2, 2011

The Wall Street Journal.com. (November 26, 2011). Greece Faces 'Mortal Danger' Amid
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Homer Etc Examples of Greek

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98789101

Gradually the Greek hero recognizes (peripeteia) that his visitors are the hated Greeks who once abandoned him, in disguise. Philoctetes denounces the foul plot and demands back his bow, realizing once again he is alone in the world. (anagnorisis)

In Euripides, "Hippolytus," pity and fear (pathos) is evoked by Phaedra's unbridled passion for her stepson Hippolytus. The recognition element of the drama (peripeteia) comes when both Phaedra and Hippolytus see that their mutually incompatible desires both for others (in the case of Phaedra) and also to be removed from others (as expressed in the character of the young, title son of Theseus) are inescapable. This recognition is shortly followed by the terrible peripeteia of Theseus that his wife has lied to him and he has cast off his son as nothing, for nothing. The final tragic anagnorisis comes with Athena's visit. Athena exposes Theseus' folly of his love for his…… [Read More]

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Historical View of the Greek Heroic Ideal

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87791054

Greco-oman Tradition

How does the ideal of heroic citizenship change from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through the emergence of Greek tragic drama to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism?

Mythopoeic thought holds that the occurrences of events are the result of an act of will on the part of gods and spirits. A thread of anthropomorphism runs through this mythopoeic thinking as impersonal laws of nature and the deductive generalizations of logic are not a part of the mythopoeic framework: instead, every event is an aspect of some personal being. A mythopoeic orientation is one of the most primitive lenses used by humans to explain and attribute meaning to phenomena. Sensemaking in naive cultures typically involves attribution of human motivation to the inanimate and to otherwise inexplicable events. Indeed, the term mythopoeic means myth-making, from the Greek muthos or myth and poiein which means to make. From the anthropomorphic position…… [Read More]

References

Bowra, C.M. (1957). The Greek Experience. New York: Praeger. In Steven Kreis, History Guide (2006).

Dunkle, R. (1986). The classical origins of western culture. Brooklyn, NY: Brooklyn College, The City University of New York.

[Type text]
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Shakespeare's Othello Is it a Tragedy According

Words: 1987 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89018144

Shakespeare's Othello: Is it a tragedy according to Aristotle?

Aristotle and tragedy

Aristotle defines tragedy as imitation of an action that is serious and has a certain dramatic and complete magnitude. Tragedy to Aristotle is something that is:

"A form of drama exciting the emotions of pity and fear. Its action should be single and complete, presenting a reversal of fortune, involving persons renowned and of superior attainments, and it should be written in poetry embellished with every kind of artistic expression. (Poetics, Part IX)

Aristotle saw tragedy as a simulation of an event that aroused pity and fear in the individual and, by doing so, served as a form of catharsis in the individual could identify with the plot and feel a certain sort of purging or relief (VI.2).

In fact, it is this sense of purging that most distinguishes the tragedy from the comedy or epic (for instance)…… [Read More]

Reference

Aristotle. (1970). Poetics. Univ. Of Michigan Press

Gellrich, M. (1988). Tragedy and theory. The problem of conflict since Aristotle. Princeton: Princeton Univ.

Greek theory of tragedy: Aristotle's Poetics academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/tragedy.html

New York College. Outline of Aristotle's theory of tragedy www.cnr.edu/home/bmcmanus/poetics.html
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Roxana and Her Tragedy

Words: 4623 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64596361

Roxana as Tragedy

"Roxana" stands unique among Daniel Defoe's work in that it ends a tragedy. The work is a lot more than that, however. "Roxana" dispenses with the formalities associated with many texts and paints sex as a commodity from the very get-go. Roxana ends up a tragedy not so much because of what transpires at the end of the novel, but because Roxana herself cannot deal with her decision to prostitute herself: Roxana is a tragic figure because at the end she cannot reconcile her morals, her guilt and the fact that although she has been able to achieve wealth through her actions, through social upward mobility has eluded her, partly through her own eyes. In fact, her reliance on her beauty and body compound this desire for social upward mobility, and eventually result in a sort of manic race to delude not only her daughter, newest Dutch…… [Read More]

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Aristotle's Tragedy and Shakespeare's Othello

Words: 1864 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78682472

Shakespeare's Othello

A lot of genres throughout history have been tested over time among which 'tragedy' has been the most favorite one. Tragedy reveals a debacle tale of a good or valuable person through misinterpretation and fatal mistakes along with the production of misfortune and awareness on the protagonist's part and arousal of fear and sympathy on the audience's part. Aristotle, an ancient Greek thinker, is considered to have been the key ruling forces of tragedy. 'Poetics,' a masterpiece literature is considered to be the key authority that defines a true misfortune (Aristotle, 1968, pgs 33-35).

A character filled with tragedy must lift the story plot in every tragedy and that hero has to accomplish particular rules to be called a tragic hero. Aristotle presents some rules of a tragic hero which state that the character should not be displayed fleeting through an excellent fortune to a bad one; while…… [Read More]

References

Altman, J.B. (1987). "Preposterous Conclusions": Eros, Enargeia, and the Composition of Othello. Representations Journal. No. 18, pp. 129-157

Altman, J.B. (2010). The Improbability of "Othello": Rhetorical Anthropology and Shakespearean Selfhood. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

Aristotle. (1968). Aristotle on the Art of Fiction: An English Translation of Aristotle's Poetics. CUP Archive Publications, pgs 33-35.

Dominguez-Rue, E and Mrotzekb, M. (2012). Shakespearean tragedies dynamics: identifying a generic structure in Shakespeare's four major tragedies. International Journal of General Systems. Vol. 41, No. 7, 667 -- 681.
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Classical Greek Theater

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22673869

omen in Ancient Tragedy and Comedy

Both the drama of Euripides' "Medea" and the comedy of Aristophanes' "Lysistrata" seem unique upon a level of even surface characterization, to even the most casual students of Classical Greek drama and culture. Both in are female-dominated plays that were produced by male-dominated societies and written by men. Both the drama and the comedy features strong women as their central protagonists, whom are depicted under extreme circumstances, in relatively positive lights. And both plays, despite their very different tones, also have an additional, unique feature in that they show 'the enemy' -- or the non-Greek or non-Athenian, in a fairly positive and humane fashion.

The sympathies of the viewer for female's plights are immediately arisen by Aristophanes from the first scene of "Lysistrata," as Cleonice, the friend of Lysistrata, and a common Athenian housewife states, regarding the lateness of the other women that frustrates…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arkins, Brian. "Sexuality in Fifth-Century Athens." Ancient History: Journal of University College Dublin, Ireland, Volume 1: 1994. http://ancienthistory.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.ucd.ie/%7Eclassics/94/Arkins94.html

Aristophanes. "Lysistrata." Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997. http://m3.doubleclick.net/875354/freeze10012004.html

Euripides. "Medea." MIT Classics Archive, 2001. Retrieved on 6 November 1997 at  http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html 

Hemminger, Bill. "Why Study Ancient World Cultures?" Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997.
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Shakespeare Tragedies

Words: 2554 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36157028

Shakespeare Never Read Aristotle?

Or, the dynamic forms of catharsis and tragic flaws in Shakespeare's plays

Shakespeare's most beloved plays are his tragedies. If one were to list his best and most popular plays: Othello, Romeo & Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear, and so forth, one would find the list comprised almost entirely of tragedies. So it would not be amiss to say that much of the modern literary conception of theatrical tragedy is shaped and influenced by Shakespeare. At the same time, the definitions of the tragic form as understood at the roots of theatrical history (in Greco-Roman times) continue to be part and parcel of the official comprehension of tragedy. Many critics have sought to fore Shakespeare into the mold of tragedy defined in Aristotle's Poetica, and many others have rightfully protested that he was not cast from that mold, and that in fact he owes little to it.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aristotle. Poetica. Trans. W.H. Fyfe. http://www.noncontradiction.com/ac_works_b38.asp

Charlton, H.B. "Humanism and Mystery" Shakespeare The Tragedies. Ed. Alfred

Harbage. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1964. 10-18.

Harbage, Alfred. "Introduction" Shakespeare The Tragedies. Ed. Alfred Harbage.
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Synge's Riders to the Sea Analysis of

Words: 1414 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21754

Synge's iders To The Sea

Analysis of structure, narrative, and irony in Synge's "iders to the Sea"

John Millington Synge is considered to be one of Irish literature's most influential writers. Born near Dublin in 1871, he was highly interested in studying music before turning his attentions to literature. In 1898, Synge made his first visit to the Aran Islands, which he continued to visit at various intervals for the next four years (J.M. Synge, n.d.). It was during this time that he began to study the way of life on the islands. "On they rocky, isolated islands, Synge took photographs and notes. He listened to the speech of the islanders, a musical, old-fashioned, Irish-flavored dialect of English. He conversed with them in Irish and English, listened to stories, and learned the impact that the sound of word could have apart from their meaning" (J.M. Synge, n.d.). The influence of…… [Read More]

References

J.M. Synge. (n.d.). The Poetry Foundation. Accessed 17 February 2013, from  http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/j-m-synge 

Notes on Synge's "Riders to the Sea." (n.d.). Bielefeld University. Accessed 17 February 2013,

from  http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/lili/personen/fleischmann/archsuse03/notesirl6onsynge.htm 

Synge, J.M. (1902). Riders to the Sea. Chapter 13.
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Sophocles Oedipus

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16519282

Sophocles' Oedipus the King

Look up and/or reflect on the meaning of:

Tragedy: A tragedy is any event which causes great suffering and stress, such as the death of a loved one or a natural disaster. In the context of Greek literature, tragedy was the most popular form of theatre, with storytellers relying on the rhetorical technique of tragic irony to create emotionally resonant tales of lost love and territorial conquest.

Philosophy: The overall study of the human condition, reality, metaphysics, and other pursuits of higher intelligence.

Psychology: The scientific study of the human mind, including cognitive function, perception, attention, emotion and behavior.

Logic: The fundamental application of reasoning to the pursuit of problem solving, a function which only the human mind is known to hold the capacity to perform.

Ethics: The branch of philosophy which postulates certain standards which should be used to guide proper human conduct.

Mathematics: The…… [Read More]

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Structure of Ancient and Modern Dramas to

Words: 816 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36161336

structure of ancient and modern dramas to highlight their differences and similarities. The paper also shows how drama evolved over the centuries with references to Greek, Elizabethan and Modern plays.

MODEN AND ANCIENT DAMA: A COMPAISON

Drama has an inherent ability to adapt itself to the thinking and wishes of the society in which it takes birth. Therefore modern drama with all its intensity, relevance and eloquence is certainly more popular among modern audiences than its ancient counterpart. Still we cannot deny the importance of ancient dramatic concepts, models and devices in the development and evolution of modern drama. While ancient plays are mostly remembered for their grandeur and myths, close analysis reveals that there is more to them than meets the eye. All ancient Greek tragedies contain some similar elements, which set them apart from tragedies of later eras. While they basically concentrated on highlighting the significance of myths,…… [Read More]

References

Aristotle The POETICS Book XIII: 350 BCE Translated by S.H. Butcher Online version:

 http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.html 

Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, 1949 Penguin USA, 1 edition, October 6, 1998

Arthur Miller, "Tragedy and the Common Man," from The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller (Viking Press, 1978)
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Eugene O'Neill's Mythic Re-Enactments

Words: 2061 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3968583

Mourning Becomes Electra

It must have come as something of a shock for the original audience of Eugene O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra in 1931 to take their seats, open their programs, and discover that this extremely lengthy trilogy of plays does not actually contain a character named "Electra." This may seem like an obvious point, but it is one worth considering as we approach O'Neill's American analogue to the Oresteia of Aeschylus -- the title essentially gives away the plot. Yet this would have been precisely the case with the original audience in fifth century Athens for a Greek tragedy: they arrived already knowing the myth of Electra or Oedipus or Medea, and so therefore what was being witnessed was, in some sense, a ritual re-enactment rather than a plot-driven narrative. Even the rare Greek tragedy that does introduce surprise into its plot, like the Orestes of Euripides, does so…… [Read More]

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Clytemnestra and Iphigenia One of

Words: 909 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 92694391

This temper surely gave Clytemnestra the ability to withstand her "wretched life" by serving as a type of emotional outlet for her anger and disappointment related to being imprisoned in her own household as the doting wife of Agamemnon who certainly experienced sexual encounters with other women as leader of the Greek armies at Troy.

Another example has Clytemnestra admitting "Thus harassed by these ever-rife reports

(i.e., that Agamemnon was dead)/Full often from my neck have forceful hands/Seized and untied the beam-suspended noose" (Swanwick, 179), a reference to attempting to hang herself from a roof beam. This indicates that Clytemnestra was indeed a very strong woman with sufficient inner strength to do away with herself because of her grief associated with Agamemnon and his alleged death at the hands of the Trojans -- "For a woman severed from her mate/To sit forlorn at home is grievous woe" (Swanwick, 179).

In…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Martin, Thomas R. Ancient Greece: From Prehistoric to Hellenistic Times. New Haven, CT:

Yale University Press, 1996.

Swanwick, Anna, Trans. The Dramas of Aeschylus. London: George Bell & Sons, 1907. Rpt.

Constable, 2005.
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Messed Up Family That Breaks

Words: 2044 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32556723

There isn't one time in the film that Martin doesn't act out of passion. Unlike Oedipus, Martin does not choose blindness but rather it is a result of his passion and desire for Mini.

atching Mini's First Time, the audience has a sort of god-like perspective as perhaps the audience felt in one of the great Greek theatres. As one watches the film, there is a definite feeling that it isn't going to end well for the humans involved. e can see the machinations growing and growing until they spin out of control and utter chaos is revealed. e are not sure what the fate of the characters will be, unlike Oedipus because we are so familiar with it, but like Oedipus, we know that there isn't much hope. In the Iliad and Odyssey, the gods do occasionally look down upon the humans with some compassion and interest -- and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. (Berg, Stephen., Clay, Diskin) Oedipus the King by Sophocles. Oxford University Press: Trade edition. 1988.

Ovid. (Martin, Charles) Metamorphoses. W.W. Norton & Company. 2005.
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Oedipus Was a Respectable Leader

Words: 910 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Reaction Paper Paper #: 7631064

11- 3). The Chorus' summations are necessary for continuity in the play, answering any questions or expounding upon certain thoughts or themes. The Chorus has the last word in the play, leaving a lasting impression with the audience, which includes a message of desolation to all. The Chorus says, "Let none / Presume on his good fortune until he find / Life, at his death, a memory without pain" (Exodus. 298-300). These are examples of how the Chorus reinforces what the audience may already be thinking. The Chorus connects certain aspects of the play and emphasizes Sophocles' themes.

The resolution of the play is harsh. This, of course, makes the play a tragedy but the extent of the pain Oedipus suffers is monumental. e can say he was headstrong and perhaps deserved something for his arrogance but the circumstances are so bizarre it is no wonder the man took out…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. Oedipus the King. Fagles, Robert, trans. New York: Penguin Books. 1984.
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Human & Divine the Relationship

Words: 1242 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62762435

He completed the tasks. hen Hercules was dying, he was placed upon a funeral pyre, where he "ascended to Olympus, where he was granted immortality and lived among the gods" (Ellingson).

The Hebrew culture approaches the question of the interrelationship of the human and the divine in a manner substantially different than the Greek or Roman cultures. In fact, there are substantial differences in the Greek and Hebrew schools of thought, even down to descriptions of objects. For example, "the Greek culture describes objects in relation to the object itself. The Hebrew culture describes objects in relation to the Hebrew himself" ("Hebrew Thought"). Therefore, any Hebrew description of the divine automatically reflects the interrelationship between the divine and the human.

Both ancient Greeks and ancient Romans believed that the gods were actively and intimately involved in the lives of humans. In fact, modern Christianity can be said to arise from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ancient Hebrew Civilization." Public Bookshelf. 2003. LoveToKnow, Inc.Public Bookshelf. 12

Mar. 2005 http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Story_of_the_GreatestNations_and_the_Worlds_Famous_Events_Vol_1/ancienth_ja.html

Ellingson, Lief. "Hercules." Encyclopedia Mythica. 2005. Pantheon.org. 12 Mar. 2005  http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/roman/articles.html .

Epstein, Paul. "The Recovery of a Comprehensive View of Greek Tragedy." Animus: A Philosophical Journal for Our Time. 1996. University of Newfoundland. 12 Mar. 2005  http://www.mun.ca/animus/1996vol1/epstein.htm .
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Oedipus Tyrannus Sophocles' Play Considers

Words: 1387 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85756500

Oedipus also chose not to ask questions regarding his past, although this might be ascribed to the fact that he did not know to ask in the first place. It was his choice to leave his adopted family to escape the prophesy that he knows about. The adopted family however choose even at this point not to inform Oedipus of the true nature of his fate.

Another choice that Oedipus makes is to kill Laius at the crossroads, regardless of the fact that the prophesy is very specific regarding where the murder will take place. When he marries the wife of the dead king, it also does not occur to him that this is remarkably parallel to the prophesy. One might therefore argue that Oedipus might have been deliberately blind to the truth of his actions in order to further his own good fortune. On the other hand, ophocles' aim…… [Read More]

Sources

Sophocles. Oedipus Tyrannus. http://www.mala.bc.ca/~johnstoi/sophocles/oedipustheking.htm
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Major Themes in European Literature

Words: 2421 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13929846

contemplated an individual's relationship with his or her environment. In Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Sophocles explores the relationship an individual has with the world and society. In each of these plays, Sophocles juxtaposes divinity and humanity and investigates the role of each within Theban society as well as looks into conflicts that arise when the laws of man conflict with divine laws. Through their narratives, Oedipus Rex and Antigone posit man is intended to serve others, including gods, and that they do not exist to be self-serving.

Oedipus Rex revolves around an eponymous anti-hero who by saving the city of Thebes from a Sphinx inadvertently and simultaneously brought forth a plague upon it. By defeating the Sphinx, Oedipus secured his place upon the Theban throne and as such was not only responsible for ensuring laws were abided, but was also responsible for protecting Thebes' citizens. Because of the plague that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. Antigone. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard Lattimore.

2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 160-212.

-. Oedipus Rex. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard

Lattimore. 2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 10-76.
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Black-Figured Panel Amphora at the

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99397545

C.E. With this particular piece, the artist was less concerned with anatomical description than with the problems of foreshortening in the figures and of showing them from different viewpoints. The turning and twisting of the figures indicate that the artist was beginning to view them as three-dimensional volumes with free mobility in a space deeper than the flat, two-dimensional surface of a picture plane, a significant departure from the pre-Greek tradition.

Essentially, the representations on the black figure panel amphora were obviously inspired by the Homeric epic of the Iliad, a poem which relates the famous tale of the attack by the Greek army on the city of Troy. The character of Achilles is by far the most important, for he was considered the best of the Greeks and without equal, the mighty warrior and pre-eminent holder of the Greek principle of excellence in all things. As he engages in…… [Read More]

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Company Through Ethical Problem Years Read Article

Words: 1099 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 38911048

company through ethical problem years. ead article summarize key points: company involved; problem hand; steps company; outcry public/government; final outcome. Then analyze issue involved: How event avoided; what company; what charge; long -term effects issue.

Goldman Sachs' Greek tragedy

Companies' misbehavior usually has a deleterious effect upon their customers, employees, and shareholders. However, in the case of the investment banking firm Goldman Sachs, the unethical behavior of Goldman caused the downfall of an entire country and has impeded the economic growth of the European Union. "One deal created by Goldman Sachs helped obscure billions in debt from the budget overseers in Brussels," enabling the nation of Greece to conceal its debt from the EU when it first made a bid for membership, and to continue to "skirt European debt limits" mandatory for continued membership in the EU (Story, Thomas & Schwartz 2010: 1).

In 2001, Greece was admitted to the…… [Read More]

References

Story, Louise, Landon Thomas & Nelson Schwartz. (2010). Wall Street helped to mask debt fueling Europe's crisis. The New York Times. Retrieved:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/business/global/14debt.html?_r=1&pagewanted=1&th&emc=th 

Surowiecki, James. (2011). Dodger mania. The New Yorker. Retrieved:

 http://www.newyorker.com/talk/financial/2011/07/11/110711ta_talk_surowiecki#ixzz1u2VqAbuf
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Heroic Ideal Greece Rome an Analysis of

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49939858

Heroic Ideal Greece, ome

An Analysis of the Heroic Ideal from Ancient Greece to oman Empire

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece begins with Homer's Iliad, which balances the heroic figures of Achilles and Hector, two opposing warriors and men of honor, amidst a war on which not even the gods are in agreement. Hector and Achilles mirror one another in nobility and strength and both represent an ideal heroic archetype of citizenry -- men who do battle to honor both their countries and their names. To illustrate, however, the way the ideal of heroic citizenship changes from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism, it is necessary to leap ahead several centuries and survey the several different bodies of work.

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece somewhat continually dwells on the same themes with regard to heroic citizenship, whether in Homer or in the Golden Age…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aristophanes. (1973). Lysistrata/The Acharnians/The Clouds. Trans. Alan Sommerstein. NY: Penguin Classics, 1973.

Homer. (2008). The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. UK: Oxford University Press.
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Farewell My Concubine

Words: 1838 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74906244

Farewell My Concubine

Kaige Chen's 1993 film Farewell My Concubine traces the development of several characters and the evolution of China throughout the twentieth century, from the Warlord Era in the 1920s until the end of the Cultural Revolution in the 1970s. The social and political upheavals occurring in the country mirrors the strife in the personal lives of Cheng Dieyi, Duan Xiaolou, and Juxian. War, chaos, and social turbulence are apt backgrounds for the depiction of these three central characters. The events of the film begin in Beijing during the warlord era, in 1924. A prostitute names Yanhong carries her child through a crowded public area, where a performance by the Beijing opera enthralls a rowdy crowd. Yanhong ignores a man who calls her a whore, an act that sets the stage for one of the film's overarching themes: social class conflict and the ill treatment of both actors…… [Read More]

On the eve of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in 1966, which was designed to "reconstruct people's mind," fire becomes a key symbol for transformation, destruction, and change. Dieyi burns the costumes he despises, as Duan and Juxian burn jade relics of the old society. Later he, Duan Xialou, and Juxian are ridiculed in public in front of a great bonfire, their lives at stake. Figures like Na Kun slander and rat out Dieyi, calling the three of them "reactionary" and "anti-party." Like the opera "Farewell My Concubine," the King, played by Duan Xialou, is being defeated by the Han invaders, played by the Communists. In spite of his being "bold and resourceful," he cannot escape his fate.

Farewell my Concubine ends and begins in 1977, ten years after the Cultural Revolution. Dieyi and Duan Xialou are reunited after more than a decade of being apart and are set to perform "Farewell My Concubine" in front of an unseen audience. As his final moment of retribution, Dieyi kills himself on the sword that the pair had been performing with since their early days in the Beijing Opera. Now all of the events of the classical Chinese opera have came to pass, as Duan screams his final farewell to Concubines Yu and Dieyi.

The film captures decades of cultural, political, and social turmoil in China and juxtaposes several layers of characters in play-within-a-play format. The Cultural Revolution eliminated the appearance of the old social stratification, but the lives of actors and prostitutes remain substandard. When Duan, Dieyi, and Juxian stand before their communist accusers, all three of them are ridiculed for being low life actors and prostitutes, a bold assessment of the failure of the proletarian revolution to instill social equity on top of a millenia-old Chinese culture.
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Assassination of Indira Gandhi

Words: 2827 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16380573

Indira Gandhi's assassination and the assassination itself. This paper delves into her early life to understand her political steps. Furthermore, it highlights the economic and political climate of India during her rule. Lastly the paper concludes whether Indira Gandhi can be understood within the context of a tragic heroine.

Indira Gandhi has been a controversial figure in the political history of India. Descending from the most important dynasty of India, Indira ruled India for a total of twelve years; a tenure that ended with her assassination. In retrospect, it is evident that her assassination was a direct result of the ways that she employed in running India's domestic policy. According to some, Indira Gandhi's life can be termed as a Greek tragedy and herself as the tragic heroine. According to Aristotle's description of a tragic hero which he gave in Poetics, a tragic hero is a person who falls from…… [Read More]

References

Dumar, Dhrub. Impact of Indira Gandhi on Indian Political System. Harper Collins: 1999.

Frank, Katherine. Indira: The Life of Indira Nehru Gandhi. Harper Collins; 2001

Gupte, Pranay. Mother India: A Political Biography of Indira Gandhi. Scribners Charles Sons; 1992.

Jayakar, Pupul. Indira Gandhi: An Intimate Biography. Pantheon Books Inc.: 1993.
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Media Critical Analysis Hamlet Hamlet

Words: 4649 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32409674

Yes, the Oedipus complex aspect of Shakespeare it gives us and which in turn invites us to think about the issue of subjectivity, the myth and its relation to psychoanalytic theory. (Selfe, 1999, p292-322)

Hemlet and Postcolonial theory

Postcolonial theory was born as a result of the publication of the famous work of Edward Said, Orientalism (1978). This theory claim that some authors (Paul Gilroy, Achille Mbembe, Francoise Verges, etc.) and that seem so elegant in its formulation, in my opinion raises three fundamental problems: At a time when we are witnessing the emergence of new expressions of colonialism (colonialism, cultural, political and economic globalization, neo-colonialism nestled in the relationship between the hegemonic colonial past and their old colonies, colonialism in disguise that structure the relationship between international institutions and developing countries, institutions from the rest behest of the former colonial powers according to their interests), speak of post-colonial era…… [Read More]

References

Aragay, Mireia, and Gemma Lopez. 2005. "Inflecting Pride and Prejudice: Dialogism, Intertextuality, and Adaptation." Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Ed. Mireia Aragay. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p201-19.

Aragay, Mireia, ed. 2005. Books in Motion: Adaptation, Intertextuality, Authorship. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi, p88-96.

Baetens, Jan. 2007. "From Screen to Text: Novelization, the Hidden Continent." The Cambridge Companion to Literature on Screen. Ed. Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, p226-38.

Balides, Constance. 2000. "Jurassic Post-Fordism: Tall Tales of Economics in the Theme Park." Screen 4 I .2: p139-60.
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Classical Drama

Words: 1531 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89972241

Love Got to Do With it: A Critical Analysis of Hippolytus and Lysistrata.

If one reads Hippolytus and Lysistrata, one may immediately conclude that love has 'nothing' to do with anything. Many Greek plays discuss the subject of love in obtuse ways. Love is often the driving force of Greek tragedies, thought to inspire, incite and even enrage in many cases. While love is an important concept and theme, it is not always presented in a positive light in many plays. This is certainly the case in Hippolytus and Lysistrata, which at best suggest that love is unnecessary or tragic.

Hippolytus written by Euripides does so remarkably well, suggesting that love is something that can not only be manipulated by the Gods, but also something that is less tangible in some cases than passion and lust.

Lysistrata, written by Aristophanes, puts sex and power on a pedestal above love suggesting…… [Read More]

References:

Seldes, G. (1930). "Aristophanes' Lysistrata: A new version." New York: Farrar &

Rinehart.

Sutherland, D. (1960). "Hippolytus in Drama and Myth: The Hippolytus of Euripides."

Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.
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Oedipus the King by Sophocles

Words: 1885 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 87431620

Both men suffer, and both men have to continue living with that suffering, while losing the people they care about the most. That tragedy is even more apparent in Dove's work, with the misunderstanding about Augustus and what he managed to do in the plantation house. His fate seems more tragic, somehow, because he is being commended for something that he did not do, and is being treated as a hero when in fact he is nothing of the sort. He will have to live up to that reputation in the slave community and it is clear that he will not be able to continue that pretense for very long.

In conclusion, both of these plays use the central theme of incest for different purposes. Dove uses it to illustrate the enduring images of slavery, relationships between blacks and whites and how they were skewed, and how slaves were abused…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, Harold, ed. Black American Women Poets and Dramatists. New York: Chelsea House, 1996.

Carlisle, Theodora. "Reading the Scars: Rita Dove's the Darker Face of the Earth." African-American Review 34.1 (2000): 135.

Dove, Rita. "The Darker Face of the Earth." American Theatre Nov. 1996: 33+.

The Darker Face of Earth. 2nd ed. Brownsville: Storyline P, 1996.
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Blade A Conflict of Self

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10160534

Though he has vowed to destroy as many vampires as he can and to protect humankind, he is faced with the paradox of destroying part of his identity while trying to save the other. Blade possesses many qualities of a hero, particularly the qualities imbued by his vampiric semi-transformation and his ability and resolve to be courageous for the betterment of humanity. Mythological heroes, much like Blade, often had a close, but conflicted, relationship with their supernatural adversaries and benefactors. Though Blade possesses characteristics of a classical hero, he is also a Byronic hero, as well as an antihero. Like the Byronic hero, Blade comes from a troubled past, is emotionally conflicted, intelligent, and mysterious, but is also considered an outcast. Because Blade is not human, nor is he demon, he struggles to find his place in the world and is forced to live on the fringe of both societies,…… [Read More]

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Asterios Polyp a Variety of

Words: 3510 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16132884

Mazzucchelli on behalf of Asterios (or Ignazio in abstentia) asks in words and graphics whether dividing lives into dualities and opposites is simply easier for than accepting "a sphere of possibilities." As Asterios states as he bends his head over his cigarettes, which are an unusual addiction for such a structured person, "It's just a convenient organizing principle." "As long as one doesn't mistake the system for reality," answers Ignazio. Although Asterios believes that he can handle the human tendency to simplify and sever, it is this division that breaks his emotional attachment with Hana, causing their relationship to dry up with neglect and boredom.

The scenes of disharmony between Hana and Asterios are text- and graphic-filled and colorful and morphing. In exaggerated graphics that portray how each person is thinking, Mazzuchelli shows how individuals build walls around themselves and become introverted as they are placed on the defensive and…… [Read More]

Goldmund and Narcissus respect each other, but they are two very different people, and the former is a student and the latter a teacher. They also feel that one is dangerous to the other. Narcissus takes care of Goldmund, and the polarity between the two becomes clearer over time. It is Narcissus who is the ascetic, the thinker; he does not accept that love is going to come into his life, regardless that he truly loves Goldmund. On the other hand, Goldmund, a man of outwardly love, sees his love unreturned. How can a man of the mind and a man of emotion and spirit find equality and friendship? Narcissus says to disappoint Goldmund: "It is not our aim to merge into one another, but to understand one another, to see and appreciate the other as he is: the other's contradiction and complement." Nor does Narcissus take Goldmund seriously, since he is not a deep thinker.

Goldmund travels for a number of years and gets his fill of life and women. When he returns, Narcissus once again relates the distinction between the two men. Goldmund always had "a dislike of the abstract," thinking in images, but "thinking has nothing to do with images, but with concepts and formulas. Exactly there, where the images end, philosophy begins." If Goldmund had instead become a thinker, he would have become a mystic, and mystics "are all unhappy people." Rather, Goldmund becomes an artist, which pleases Narcissus: "Be yourself, try to fulfill yourself," Narcissus says, to reach perfection. Goldmund leaves one more time and returns a broken man. Narcissus now says: "Let me now tell you, how deeply I love you, how much you always have been to me, how rich you made my life," and kisses him. Goldmund responds: "I have always loved you, Narcissus, half my life has been an attempt to attract you." Narcissus cares for his friend, until he dies. "Goldmund's last words burned in his heart like fire." Similarly, Asterios returns to Hana, and the two sit quietly together, at one and at peace.

Mazzucchelli, David. Asterios Polyp. New York: Pantheon, 2009
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Theatrical Analysis of Macbeth and Antigone

Words: 2314 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81004977

Theatrical Analysis of Macbeth and Antigone

The most accounted features of a tragedy are the gloominess of atmosphere, solemnity of action, mental conflicts, strain, suspense and capability of capturing the audience. Tragedy tries to stimulate the sentiments of pity and fear (Devi 1). Thus, this study is comparing the two Shakespearean and Greek tragedies, Macbeth and Antigone. This analysis will compare and contrast the two plays, their theme, comparison of main characters, conflict, plot etc. The purpose of this study is to provide a deeper understanding of the plays to the reader and to assess the similarity and differences in both the plays. Macbeth unfolds the story of a man, ambitious to become a king. He even murders King Duncan to fulfil his ambition due to the prophecy of the three witches and his wife, Lady Macbeth. However, he ends up dying because of his greediness. Antigone, on the other…… [Read More]

References

Boyd, Catherine Bradshaw. The Isolation of Antigone and Lady Macbeth. The Classical Journal, vol. 47, no. 5(Feb., 1952), 174-177+203, 2014,  http://www.wwrsd.org/cms/lib04/NJ01000230/Centricity/Domain/230/Article%203.pdf . Accessed 11 Apr. 2017.

Cap, Adam. Creon as a Tragic Character in "Antigone." AdamCap.com, 16 Feb. 2016,  https://adamcap.com/schoolwork/creon-as-a-tragic-character-in-antigone/  Accessed 12 Apr. 2017.

Chu, Dennis. Comparison of Macbeth and Oedipus. Prezi.com, 2010,  https://prezi.com/jyrpci7hthum/comparison-of-macbeth-and-oedipus/ . Accessed 10 Apr. 2017.

Collins, J. Churton. Structure and Plot of Antigone. TheatreHistory.com, 2006,  http://www.theatrehistory.com/ancient/structure_and_plot_of_antigone.html . Accessed 10 Apr. 2017.
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Les Troyens by Berlioz Is

Words: 995 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36555766

From this point-of-view, Aeneas can be viewed as having failed also from the role of hero because he did not succeed in averting the danger. Even so, it is important to note the fact that Berlioz portrayed him still as a chosen individual. The fact that Aeneas had a premonition in a dream of the falling Troy made him a particular actor in the scene. The symbolism in this sense is related to the dream and the warning. However, the warning came too late and Aeneas failed as the head of his men and as the potential defender of Troy.

There are two feminine characters in Les Troyens. One is Dido, Queen of Carthage, and Cassandra, the Trojan prophetess and Priam's daughter. Cassandra's role however is very important because it draws the attention on the Shakespearian influences of the opera. In most of Shakespeare's works there is such a present.…… [Read More]

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Summary Discussion Thoughts on Racine S Phaedra

Words: 611 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 99566944

Jean Racine's Phaedra is an example of French neoclassical tragedy, which means that it observes certain formal rules of construction. For a start, Racine uses a classical model: in this case, it is the Athenian tragedy Hippolytus, by Euripides, whose basic plot is adapted by Racine. But the larger compositional procedure in neoclassical tragedy involves what is termed "observing the unities." This is a rule from Aristotle's Poetics, the standard ancient critical work on tragedies, which declares that a tragic drama should exhibit a unity of time, a unity of place, and a unity of action. This means in practice that the tragic plot should take place in continuous time over the course of one day or night, in the same location, and be centered generally on the main dramatic conflict and action without subplots. Racine's Phaedra observes these rules punctiliously, as the entire play takes place in a continuous…… [Read More]

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Carl Orff

Words: 2111 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65099227

Carl Orff a German composer, was born in Munich, Germany on July 10, 1895. Munich had been the place where Orff grew up and where his life had been shaped. The childhood days of Orff brought him a lot of memories that he used later as inspirations for his works and compositions.

Carl Orff started to develop his talent in music at the age of 5. He received his first piano, organ, and cello lessons in 1900. At the age of 16, he had already composed almost 50 songs using the text of classical authors such as Heinrich Heine and Friedrich Hoelderlin (www.dhm.de).When he was at the age of 19, Orff served in First World War for a short period of time

Carl Orff's genius in music was nourished and developed into a master's art at the Academy for the Musical Arts, a music school in Munich where Orff studied.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, S.E. Carl Orff and the Orff Approach. Available at  http://www2.potsdam.edu/CRANE/campbemr/curriculum/teaching-texts/orff-approach.html . Internet. Accessed 28 November 2003.

Harris, William; Levey, Judity. "Carl Orff.," in The New Columbia Encyclopedia.

1994 ed.

Schmerda, Susanne. 2000. 50 Years of Music for Children.
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Agamemnon S Murder in the Odyssey and Libation Bearers

Words: 1407 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71772375

Odyssey/Libation Bearers

The Odyssey, which was written by Homer, and the Libation Bearers, which was written Aeschylus are some of the ancient Greek writings that act as classic literature. These writings depict events and tragedies that happened in the traditional Greek society and provide important lessons for modern literature given their classical nature. One of the pertinent passages from the Odyssey by Homer and the Libation Bearers from the Greek tragedies is the story of Agamemnon. The Odyssey by Homer provides a detailed account of the life and times of Agamemnon who was a Greek king and the brother of Menelaos. On the other hand, the Libation Bearers was written after Agamemnon's death and acts as one of the major components of the trilogy by Aeschylus, an ancient Greek playwright. The passages have certain similarities and differences based on a specific theme that underpinned and/or inspired the writers.

Summaries and…… [Read More]

References

Hughes, C. (n.d.). Prelude to the Odyssey. Retrieved from Washington State University website:  http://public.wsu.edu/~hughesc/Prelude_to_the_Odyssey.html 

Suksi, A. (n.d.). The Story of the Death of Agamemnon. Retrieved from University of Western Ontario website:  http://publish.uwo.ca/~asuksi/in-class%20essay.htm 

Webster, M. (n.d.). Summary of The Libation Bearers. Retrieved from Grand Valley State University website:  http://faculty.gvsu.edu/websterm/libation.htm
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Traditional Lit Analysis Seasons Change

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68480969

"The rain, of course. It came midway though the third day, clouds the color of iron filings, the lake hammered to iron too, and the storm that crashed through the trees and beat at their tent with a thousand angry fists (p.4)." This quotation is all the more salient for the fact that in the subsequent paragraph the author mentions that the lovers have neglected to bring sufficient protection. The imagery of the angry fists and the grey storm ravaging trees foreshadows the consequences of such neglect.

Boyle employs a similar sense of foreboding by utilizing imagery inherent in Winter to foreshadow the trouble which the will beset upon the characters when China gives birth. Although the setting is in mid-December, the following quotation, in which China is going to meet Jeremy at a hotel to give birth and then destroy her child, is definitely like Winter in tone and…… [Read More]

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Medea Euripides One of the

Words: 1851 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87634873

Though Medea has been repeatedly referred to as a 'witch' with magical powers, she being the niece of Circe, she is, first and foremost, a woman. She is as much a human being as anybody else, and at the same time, she is in the possession of Divine powers, and this is what helps her get out of Greece and out of her husband's life. (Theater eviews)

Medea has been compared and likened to Achilles, in that she helps her friends, like Aegeus, and harms her enemies, like Pelias. She is in fact likened to a Homeric Hero, and even a step further than that, because she in fact was responsible for the death of her closest friends, her children, when she murdered them in order to spite and wreak revenge upon her husband. Though Medea assumes monstrous proportions towards the end of the play, nowhere is it stated that…… [Read More]

References

Classic Note on Medea. Retrieved at  http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Titles/medea/fullsumm.html . Accessed on 12 June, 2005

Euripides and his Tragedies. Retrieved at  http://www.theatrehistory.com/ancient/euripides001.html . Accessed on 12 June, 2005

McDonald, Marianne. Theater Reviews. Retrieved at http://didaskalia.open.ac.uk/issues/vol1no3/mac3.html. Accessed on 12 June, 2005

Medea', a Summary and analysis of the Play by Euripides. Retrieved at  http://www.theatrehistory.com/ancient/bates018.html . Accessed on 12 June, 2005
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Cassandra Written by Christa Wolf

Words: 1455 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56943618

However, she is no bloodless female, absent of sexuality, despite her resistance of Apollo. In this respect, Wolf does update her story -- rather than a virgin or a sexless prophetess, Cassandra does have a relationship with Aeneas. She loves this hero with the ardor of a young woman, calling him the soul of Troy. But because he is a man, unlike Cassandra, Aeneas can master history and triumph. The admiration of Aeneas indicates the verisimilitude Wolf brings to her tale -- Cassandra has emotions and feelings, rather than simply spouts words, as in Agamemnon.

Wolf also interjects anecdotes into the story to make it more clearly told with Trojan eyes such as the Trojan's allegation that Helen was abducted because Priam's sister Hesione's eloped with a Spartan. Again, this underlines Wolf's theme of women as pawns and spoils of war -- it does not matter what Helen or Hesione…… [Read More]

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River of God

Words: 1232 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23776703

iver of God a New History of Christian origins" by Gregory J. iley.

The iver of God

In The iver of God, Gregory iley tends to focus on the historical aspects of Christian origins that are often ignored by scholars. It is found that majority of the researchers of Christianity confine their subject matter to the inspiration from the Greek and oman. They also confuse abbinic Judaism with the Judaism of Jesus' times. Prof. iley however, takes into account Middle Eastern religious history to our search for God. iley throws light on the subject of the development of Cannanite and Mesopotamian religion in the history of ancient Judaism.

He also adds to Greek ideas of Orphism, Pythagoreanism and Plato, by throwing light on the Egyptian and Persian Zoroastrian impact on the progress of Christian concepts of afterlife. iley highlights the role of Persian Zoroastrianism to make us understand the concept…… [Read More]

Reference:

Gregory J. Riley, The River of God A New History of Christian origins, Published March

4,2003, Publisher Haper, San Francisco.
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Good Man Is Hard to Find Flannery

Words: 1512 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8823406

Good Man is Hard to Find

Flannery O'Conner's short story, a Good Man is Hard to Find is a modern parable. The story is laced with symbolism and religious subtext. In many ways the piece is similar to classical Greek plays about pride and retribution.

efore launching into a discussion of O'Conner's story it is important to understand the woman and her motivations to write. O'Conner was born in Savannah, Georgia in 1925 to her devout Catholic parents, Edward and Regina O'Conner. Flannery spent her youth attending Catholic parochial schools. In 1938, the family moved to a town just outside Atlanta called Milledgeville where Flannery continued her education. Unfortunately, her father would ultimately die in this town as the result of complications from the disease lupus. Flannery went on to Georgia State College for Women and then proceeded to the State University of Iowa where she received her MFA in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

O'Conner, Flannery. A Good Man is Hard to Find. 1953.  http://xroads.virginia.edu/~DRBR/goodman.html 

Galloway, Patrick. The Dark Side of Flannery O'Conner. 1996.  http://www.cyberpat.com/essays/flan.html 

Mitchel, J. Tin Jesus: The Intellectual in Selected Short Fiction of Flannery O'Conner. 2000. http://sunset.backbone.olemiss.edu/~jmitchel/flannery.htm

Coles, Robert. Flannery O'Conner's South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1980.
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Aeschylus - The Oresteia Agamemnon Libation Bearers

Words: 1977 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 56017260

Aeschylus - the Oresteia (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers and Eumenides)

The Oresteia offers the reader a close and intensive immersion with a truly pained universe of suffering: each play still has at its core a sense of flush of promise and vibrancy of Athens that was pushing forth and evolving into greatness. Even so, the author Aeschylus is able to captures a sense of the undercurrents of the primal vengeance that still defined this society. Each of the plays has in a common a strong pillar of the humanity and the lack of humanity that needs to be held in balance as the events spin and unfold. One could argue that the notion of suffering into truth is something which defines each of the plays in the trilogy. For instance, the first play thrusts the reader into a world which has been largely defined by the suffering of the Trojan War…… [Read More]

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Pinter Pt Finding Aristotle --

Words: 1390 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 95670223

The theatre of the absurd does not depend on eliciting certain specific emotional responses, but rather on generating any sort of emotional disturbance -- it demands that the audience question its basic emotional beliefs, not give over to them.

In a careful explication of the concept of catharsis, Allan H. Gilbert determines that pity is the primary emotion necessary for the drama to elicit (rejecting the common counterpart, fear). Pity has no real meaning in the theatre of the absurd, however; it requires a great deal more identification with the characters, when one of the major effects of the genre is to cause a certain alienation from the characters and the supposed realities of the play -- and of the surrounding world. Anger and frustration are more appropriate emotional reactions than pity to a piece of absurdist theatre, and they are more appropriately addressed towards the self and towards reality…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Belfiore, Elizabeth. "Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology." The Classical Quarterly, New Series, Vol. 35, No. 2 (1985), pp. 349-361.

Gilbert, Allan H. "The Aristotelian Catharsis." The Philosophical Review, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Jul., 1926), pp. 301-314

Pearce, Howard. "Harold Pinter's "The Black and White": Mimesis and Vision." Contemporary Literature, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Winter, 1992), pp. 688-711.

Spanos, William V. "Modern Drama and the Aristotelian Tradition: The Formal Imperatives of Absurd Time." Contemporary Literature, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Summer, 1971), pp. 345-372.
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Shattered Glass Is a 2003

Words: 1163 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63895235



Moving beyond the plot and the intricacies of life at the New epublic though, and into the world of Hollywood producers, writers, and actors, one must also ask about the veracity and credibility of the portrayals of journalistic acumen for the general public. Films such as Alan Pakula's All the President's Men (1976), Peter Weir's the Year of Living Dangerously (1982), or oland Joffe's the Killing Fields (1984), all present the journalistic morality surrounding slant, sourcing, and frankly, what to exclude to ensure the acceptance of the story. There are more examples about aggressive and expose' hunting reporters, but one asks if Glass is not being shown as the typical, epitomizing print journalism through the eyes of Hollywood, as opposed to the rouge, well-intentioned, but naively arrogant, reporter? (Bowden).

When one replays some of the key scenes in the movie, one is struck by the calm, but budding nervousness Christensen…… [Read More]

REFERENCES CONSULTED

Beckerman, G. "Facts and Fictions: Shards of Glass." Columbia Journalism Review.

42.3 (2003): 54. Print.

Bowden, M. "When the Front Page Meets the Big Screen." The Atlantic Monthly.

293.2 (2004): 146. Print.
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Colonial Resistance in Thing Fall Apart

Words: 2585 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74564629

Colonial Resistance in Things Fall Apart

Chinua Achebe was born in Ogidi, Nigeria, and his father was a teacher in a missionary school. His parents were devout evangelical Protestants and christened him Albert after Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, although they installed in him many of the values of their traditional Igbo culture. He attended University College in Ibadan, where he studied English, history and theology. At the university Achebe rejected his ritish name and took his indigenous name Chinua. In 1953 he graduated with a A, and later studied broadcasting at the C where, in 1961, he became the first Director of External roadcasting at the Nigerian roadcasting Corporation. In 1944 Achebe attended Government College in Umuahia. He was also educated at the University College of Ibadan, like other major Nigerian writers including John Okigbo, Wole Soyinka, John Pepper Clark, Elechi Amadi, and Cole Omotso. There he studied…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1958.

Balint-Kurti, Daniel. "Novelist rejects national honors to protest conditions in Nigeria." Chicago Sun-Times. 18 October 2004. 4 August 2005 .

Bowen, Roger. "Speaking Truth to Power: An Interview with Chinua Achebe." Academe. Jan/Feb 2005. 4 August 2005 .

Gallagher, Susan VanZanten. "Linguistic power: encounter with Chinua Achebe - Nigerian writer." Christian Century. 12 March 1997. 4 August 2005 .
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Nature of Justice -- Secular or Divine

Words: 1035 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31259243

Nature of Justice -- ecular or Divine?

Comparative Essay

The comparison of Antigone and Dante's Inferno is interesting as they are really quite different in style, tone, context, and story type. Both stories address the choices made by mankind, and the allegiances that people form and that impact their actions. Dante is in charge of the telling in his story, but Antigone must suffer through the interpretations, telling, and retelling of her story and that of her opponent.

Antigone. Third of the three Theban plays, Antigone is a tragedy attributed to ophocles circa 442 BC. Of the three plays set in the city of Thebes, Antigone was created first but is chronologically the last in the stream of events. Establishing the premises related to the characters in the story is dominant in the first part of the play, then the action relentlessly advances toward the outcome, which the reader assumes…… [Read More]

Sources:

Antigone. Retrieved  http://classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/antigone.html 

Dante's Inferno. Archive of Classic Poems. Retrieved  http://www.everypoet.com/archive/poetry/dante/dante_contents.htm
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Tom Stoppard's Play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are

Words: 931 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23606119

Tom Stoppard's play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and the play it was based on, Shakespeare's Hamlet, acting is a major theme and motif. Especially in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, acting signifies the falsity, absurdity, and superficiality of life. Therefore, acting and the staging of plays is a metaphor for living. However, acting also causes the audience to perceive the play in an entirely new way, especially in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. In Stoppard's play, the audience never truly suspends disbelief because even the main characters, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, refer to the audience directly and because the play has no outstanding plot. Both plays use acting to portray the futility and tragedy of life, but Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead does so in an almost slapstick way. Stoppard's play is a comedy that grossly exaggerates two minor characters in Shakespeare's Hamlet. While Shakespeare shows how acting and drama…… [Read More]

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Creon State vs Family the

Words: 1144 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52428474

Not following his own rules, in the end, would make him attractive to Thebes as he would stay close to the rules of Gods. Following his words, would have meant the despise of all Greece, something no political strategy would allow.

It could be said that his change of direction comes, therefore, from two causes. The first, and the immediate one, comes from the pressures the Chorus puts him to. It could be argued that the Chorus, in this case, is his political conscience that asks for admitting that his decision is detrimental for his rule. A leader that creates rules with effects that are opposing the beliefs of his people has little chance for a good reign, especially in the shadows of a civil war. A state with a fragile political and social system is vulnerable to exterior forces. The other cause of his decision to bury Polyneices and…… [Read More]

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Neuroeconomics What Is Neuroeconomics Provide Two Examples

Words: 2793 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 47311462

Neuroeconomics

What is Neuroeconomics? Provide two examples that standard economics failed to explain but the Neuroeconomics can.

The term is a combination of two sciences that, until recently, were thought to not connected. Neuroscience looks at what areas of the brain are stimulated by different activities, and tries to determine connections and see differences where anecdotal evidence would imagine similarities. Economics looks at the behavior of people where money is concerned and tries to understand why people behave the way they do looking at the action and the result. Of course both sciences are much more complicated than this, but when looking at where they intersect these functions matter the most. Neuroeconomics tries to determine the reasons people act in a certain way, based on a stimulus, by using imaging tools such as fMI, Pet scans, and other imaging software to show which areas of the brain activate during the…… [Read More]

References

Balasubramanian, A. (2010). Merkel in trouble: Greek debt, the EU, and politics. Harvard International Review, 32(2), 9-10.

Brown, S.B.R.E., & Ridderinkhof, K.R., (2009). Aging and the neuroeconomics of decision making. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 9(4), 365- 380.

Camerer, C.F., Loewenstein, G., & Prelec, D., (2004). Neuroeconomics: Why economics needs brains. Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 106(3), 555-579.

Cherry, P. (2012). The neuroeconomics of sales: How buyers really decide. Retrieved from  http://www.pbresults.com/sales-article/neuroeconomics-sales-how-buyers - really-decide.html
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Old Guitarist

Words: 1782 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61942504

Old Guitarist

Pablo Picasso was born on October 25, 1881 in Malaga, Spain. His father was an art teacher and a painter. Although Pablo Picasso was classically trained, he would come to "break painting out of its mold" throughout his prolific career (Aviram and Hartnett 207). Picasso first started painting in Spain, and his ideas and techniques evolved first in Barcelona. After that, Picasso spent a large amount of time in Paris pursuing a career in art. When Picasso was in Paris, he helped revolutionize art by developing cubism, a philosophy and style of painting. Cubism has been called a "towering intellectual and artistic achievement that irrevocably altered the course of European art by shattering the spatial field and reassembling its component parts from different angles," ("Picasso, Pablo" 1781). Before he developed cubism in Paris, though, Picasso developed his style in Barcelona during what is usually referred to as his…… [Read More]

References

Aviram, Amittai F. And Hartnett, Richard. "The Man with the Blue Guitar': Dialogism in Lyric Poetry." In Blevins, Jacob, Dialogism and Lyric Self-fashioning. Rosemont, 2008.

Bertman, Sandra. "The Old Guitarist (The Blind Guitarist)." LitMed. Retrieved online:  http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/view/10315 

Gedo, Mary Matthews. "A Youthful Genius Confronts His Destiny." Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies

Vol. 12, No. 2, The Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection (1986), pp. 152-165