Medea Essays (Examples)

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Myth Today We Are Going to Talk

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46360885

Myth

Today we are going to talk about the myth of Jason and Medea, and show how it has manifested in different ways in popular culture and the arts. The myth of Jason and Medea stretches back to ancient Greece, but this symbol-laden story has permeated the arts and culture since then. The story has it all: war, love, sex, death, and murder. There are innumerable different versions of the myth, but they all share some common elements in common. These elements include the portrayal of Medea as a strong and powerful woman; a real "woman to be reckoned with." Jason, who is the very same Jason as in the Argonauts and the Golden Fleece, is also a strong person but he happens to assume a subordinate role in his relationship with Medea. As we will see, Medea is the star of this myth. She remains the star of the…… [Read More]

References

PBS (2005). Jason and the Argonauts. Retrieved online:  http://www.pbs.org/mythsandheroes/myths_four_jason.html 

Waterhouse, J.W. (1907). Jason and Medea. [painting].

Withers, P.S. (2010). Jason & Medea: Introduction. Retrieved online: http://jasonmedea.net/
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Parental Violence Toward Children

Words: 2152 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38688584

killing of a child in real life has no symbolic meaning, no power other than that of an expression of evil and is, therefore, one of the worst acts a human, let alone a parent, can commit. In literature, however, the killing of children is symbolic of a diseased mind or of a diseased culture. Euripides' Medea kills her children, but she is a symbol of Mother Earth, of the Gods, and of nature all of which can exert, with no warning and no necessity of explanation, a death upon any or all of us. That which we are given can be taken away. The killing of a child in literature is, in some contexts, a symbolic reminder of the seeming arbitrariness of nature. While some critics interpret Medea as being a proactive population reducer, she can be rightly understood as a sick woman who, like the animals that eat…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Mark, David and Dubowitz, Howard. "Fathers and Child Neglect." AMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. May 17, 2000 v283 i19 p2505. Online. Internet. CD-ROM Database: Infotrac.

Mark and Dubowitz provide a keen insight into the role of fathers as the primary source of child abuse through neglect. The authors observe that the majority of single-parent homes are run by women because the father/husband has abandoned his duties. As abandonment is a key factor in analysis of Medea's motivations for murdering her children, this article provides modern examples of Jason's behaviors.

Crimmins, Susan; Langley, Sandra; Brownstein, Henry; Spunt, Barry. "Convicted women who have killed children: A Self-Psychology Perspective." Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Feb, 1997. v12. n1. p49(21). Online. Internet. CD-ROM Database: Infotrac.

The authors of this study found a prevalence of damaged psyches and significant mental problems in women convicted of killing their children. The extent that these self-damage indicators interfered with the women's ability to parent children is discussed. Links between these self-damage experiences and the homicide and explored.
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Classical Greek Theater

Words: 1363 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22673869

omen in Ancient Tragedy and Comedy

Both the drama of Euripides' "Medea" and the comedy of Aristophanes' "Lysistrata" seem unique upon a level of even surface characterization, to even the most casual students of Classical Greek drama and culture. Both in are female-dominated plays that were produced by male-dominated societies and written by men. Both the drama and the comedy features strong women as their central protagonists, whom are depicted under extreme circumstances, in relatively positive lights. And both plays, despite their very different tones, also have an additional, unique feature in that they show 'the enemy' -- or the non-Greek or non-Athenian, in a fairly positive and humane fashion.

The sympathies of the viewer for female's plights are immediately arisen by Aristophanes from the first scene of "Lysistrata," as Cleonice, the friend of Lysistrata, and a common Athenian housewife states, regarding the lateness of the other women that frustrates…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arkins, Brian. "Sexuality in Fifth-Century Athens." Ancient History: Journal of University College Dublin, Ireland, Volume 1: 1994. http://ancienthistory.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.ucd.ie/%7Eclassics/94/Arkins94.html

Aristophanes. "Lysistrata." Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997. http://m3.doubleclick.net/875354/freeze10012004.html

Euripides. "Medea." MIT Classics Archive, 2001. Retrieved on 6 November 1997 at  http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html 

Hemminger, Bill. "Why Study Ancient World Cultures?" Retrieved on 6 November 2004 from Exploring World Cultures Website, 1997.
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Unfaithful and the Faithful A

Words: 1025 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54508776

As Jason states,"Twas not for the woman's sake I wedded the king's daughter, my present wife" (Euripides 547). This shows that he has no real regard for his new wife. He also goes on to describe how they will benefit from the marriage. In part, Jason is telling the truth. He has married to further his position. His lie to Medea is that he pretends he has done it for their family, when his only real concern is himself. This shows that Jason is driven and unscrupulous, focused on getting what he wants and willing to manipulate and wrong others to achieve his own needs. This difference in what they want from life is part of the reason that Jason is an adulterer and Charles is not. Jason's drive for success is the reason he is not faithful to Medea. Jason's focus exclusively on his own personal success also means…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Euripides. Medea. New York: Dover Publications, 1993.

Flaubert, Gustav. Madame Bovary. New York: Penguin, 1982.
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Women in Greek and Hebrew

Words: 1632 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6063268

Deborah is believed to have played a key role in public arena.

Even in the male dominant society of Israel, Deborah's orders were followed and people looked up to her for advice. In the position of a prophetess, she could give orders which were readily followed: "She sent for Barak...and said to him, 'The Lord, the God of Israel, commands you: "Go, take with you ten thousand men..."" Barak was not willing to go alone and wanted Deborah to accompany him. Deborah is an important figure in ancient Hebrew culture and it is through her that we can see how this culture allowed women to have some freedom in their restricted sphere.

The daughter of Jephthah was another prominent figure. She was also a judge who ruled Israel as she was a woman of strong faith. After her father promised Lord that if he won, he would offer "whatever comes…… [Read More]

References

The Odyssey, the Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces, 6th ed. Vol 1, Ws. Norton & Co. Inc. New York

Book of Joshua" accessed online 16th april 2005:

http://www.bible.org/page.asp?page_id=886
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Women in Ancient Greece Representations in Euripides

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74800157

Women of Ancient Greece: The Plays of Euripides

The plays of Euripides reveal how poorly women were viewed in ancient Greece. From Medea to Sthenoboea to Phaedra, Euripides' women cover a wide range of forms: the vengeful, jilted lover; the plotting wife; the incestuous, lustful mother. As Chong-Gossard points out, Euripides does not shy away from "tapping into men's anxieties and frightening them with Medeas and Phaedras...women keeping silent about their devious plots."[footnoteRef:1] If anything, Euripides plays serve to reinforce the notion that in a patriarchal society, a man can never let down his guard against a woman -- because, judging from the works of Euripides, women are some of the most treacherous beings to ever walk the face of the earth. This paper will show how female power was depicted so monstrously in the works of Euripides and what it meant to Greek viewers. [1: James Harvey Kim On…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chong-Gossard, James Harvey Kim On. Gender and Communication in Euripides'

Plays. MA: Brill, 2008.

Euripides. Andromache. NY: Sparksgroup, 2003.

Euripides. Hippolytus. UK: Oxford University Press, 1973.
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Classical Greece Desire Emotion and Knowledge Greek

Words: 1132 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72763106

Classical Greece

Desire, Emotion, and Knowledge: Greek Society and Culture in the Classical Period (480-338 .C.)

Following the aftermath of Greeks' victory over Persians during 480-479 .C., Greek society has undergone rapid changes and revival in its political, economic, and cultural structures, called the Classical period of Greek society and culture. This period, 480-338 .C., is characterized by the emergence of new reforms in the society, such as the establishment of a new Athenian democratic government, the gradual assertion of women equal treatment in a patriarchal Greek society, and the flourishing of the arts through philosophy, literature, mathematics, and science.

Indeed, the Classical period is more appropriately described as a time wherein human potential and intelligence is at its highest. As Plato had stated, "Human behavior flows from three main sources: desire, emotion, knowledge." This statement from the Greek philosopher brings into lucidity the important works of literature that had…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kagan, D., S. Ozment, and F. Turner. (1995). The Western Heritage. NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Exploring Desire and Morality in Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols

Words: 1957 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97907121

Nietzsche's Twilight Of The Idols

Nietzsche mischaracterizes the Christian tradition when he states that "the Church fights passion by cutting it out." The Catholic Church has never dogmatically opposed passion, but it has opposed sin. Nietzsche is writing out of the naturalist, Romantic tradition. He is a believer in self-determination, of the will to power. He views natural instincts and natural desires as justified and in no need of Redemption. His conflict with the Church is that the Church views man as having a fallen human nature in need of redemption, which is offered through the Blood of Jesus Christ. Nietzsche rejects this view: he sees man in line with what Rousseau taught -- that what is natural is good. The Church, for example, preaches against lust because this is disordered passion. Ordered passion, according to the Church, would be sexual love between husband and wife. If one or the…… [Read More]

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Roettgen Pieta

Words: 1704 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37601396

Roettgen Pieta

In or around the year 1325, an unknown German artist sculpted a dramatic scene central to the story of Christ: the moment at which ary laments the death of her only son. This poignant moment is known as "the pity," or pieta. The pieta scene was popularized toward the end of the thirteenth century, making the Roettgen pieta one of the earliest and most historically significant representations this particular moment of passion. The scene is one that would become pervasive in Christian art and iconography, and studies of pieta sculptures can serve as proxy studies of the evolution of Western art, and Christian-themed Western art in particular. At the time the Roettgen pieta was created, pieces like these were known in German as Andachtsbild, or images used for contemplation[footnoteRef:1]. These images were especially common in Germany during the late medieval and Romanesque periods.[footnoteRef:2] oreover, "as affective meditations increased…… [Read More]

Mercer, Christia. "A Mother's Loss: The Medea and the Roettgen Pieta." Lecture. June 29, 2010.

Mercer, Christia. "Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Liebniz and Anne Conway."  http://blogs.cuit.columbia.edu/cm50/files/2011/10/Mercer-Philosophy.pdf 

Sullivan, R. "Deformity: A Modern Western Prejudice with Ancient Origins." Proceedings of the College of Physicians Edinburgh 31[2001]: 262-266.
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Aristophanes Fragments

Words: 3386 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68304506

Aristophanic invective against a rival dramatist: the fragment from the lost Lemnian omen included in Henderson's edition as number 382, attested to in two separate ancient sources (suggesting it was considered a particularly choice joke):

Because it is a pun made on the name of the tragedian Dorillus or Dorilaos -- we are not sure of the spelling, since none of his work survives and the pun in Aristophanes' fragment is the chief testimony to his work -- Henderson finds a novel solution for translating this untranslatable joke: "the women fence off their pussy shelleys" (Henderson 291). As a hint to the plot of the lost Lemnian women, the sense of sexual pleasure being deliberately withheld, as in Lysistrata, seems to adhere to this particular fragment: but indeed Martin (1987), in an important article on the use of the mythology of Lemnos and Lemnian women within Lysistrata, indicates that the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes.

Aeschylus, Suppliant Women.

Alciphron. Letters.

Aristophanes, Ekklesiazusai.
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Characters in Search of an

Words: 2066 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27012235

Pirandello's self-conscious use of the nature of theater and the way people play roles in the theater and in family life was considered revolutionary at the time. His title "Six Characters in Search of an Author" stressed the fact that the fourth wall between the audience and the actors was being broken down in the construct of the drama itself, not merely alluded to, as in a Shakespearean soliloquy or a 'play within a play device' and within a family at war traditional roles, like father/son, father/stepdaughter are broken down.

Yet as revolutionary as he may seem, Pirandello's difficult family dynamics always recalls ancient Greece and Shakespeare as much as modernism and postmodernism, as in its invocation of the Orestes cycle where there is deep hate and alienation woven within the traditional family structure, the complex family dynamic of Oedipus, and the child-parent tensions of Hamlet. In the "Orestes" trilogy,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Herman, William. "Pirandello and Possibility." The Tulane Drama Review. 10. 3 (Spring, 1966): pp. 91-111

Illiano, Antonio. "Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author: A Comedy in the Making." Italica. 44. 1 (Mar., 1967): pp. 1-12
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Instrument on the Web What Is a

Words: 737 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61733655

Instrument on the Web

What is a mezzo-soprano? (2011). Wise Geek. Retrieved April 1, 2011 at http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-mezzo-soprano.htm

his website provides a comprehensive definition of an operatic mezzo-soprano in musical and dramatic terms. A mezzo-soprano is a female singer whose vocal range lies between that of a soprano and alto. he ideal mezzo-soprano has a three-octave range, but when singing at the higher notes of her range she has a darker texture to her voice than a pure soprano. hree categories of mezzo voices exist: coloratura mezzos, lyrical mezzos who often sing the roles of young boys as well as soubrettes (second female leads), and dramatic mezzos who often take 'bad girl' roles such as Carmen.

Soprano, mezzo-soprano, and alto. (2011). My Opera. Retrieved April 1, 2011 at http://www.myoperas.com/habericerik.asp?id=31&baslik=Soprano, Mezzo-

Memorably, in the words of this website, mezzo-sopranos are often described as singing the roles of witches, britches and bitches. Witches…… [Read More]

The Metropolitan Opera is one of the most famous operas in the world, and its current season includes Wozzeck, which includes one of the roles mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne made famous (although the character of Marie is also sung by sopranos).

The Chicago Opera Theater. (2011). Official Website. Retrieved April 1, 2011 at http://chicagooperatheater.org/

The Chicago Opera Theater presents radically re-envisioned interpretations of opera classics such as Medea, as well as works by new artists.
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War for Resources Chris Hedges

Words: 3478 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90746667

Private armies and warlords support themselves with these crops -- an instance of exploiting (in fact, abusing) the environment to pay for war (Global esources, 2004).

Use of esources to Finance Conflict

Forest products are also often used to pay for conflicts. Timber requires little investment and can be converted to cash more cheaply than oil, which requires technology. Control over timber resources can shift the balance of power during a conflict and affect how long the conflict lasts. Underfunded armies, military, police, and rebel forces often finance themselves by cutting trees. Conflicts in Cambodia, Burma and Liberia have been funded with timber, and in each of those countries the wood produced more than 100 million dollars per year (Global esources, 2004).

Incompatible Uses Leading to Conflict

Use or misuse of resources can be very profitable on one hand but ruinous to another. For example, jurisdictional conflicts have heated up…… [Read More]

References

Breaking the habit (2004). The Nation (Feb 9), 178 (5), 11-14.

Brown, V.J. (2004). Battle scars: Global conflicts and environmental health. Environmental Health Perspectives, 112 (17), 994-1003.

Coles, C. (2004). Resources for peace. The Futurist (Jan/Feb), 38 (1) 6.

Conserving the Peace: Resources, Livelihoods, and Security (2002). IUCN/IISD E&S Task Force. Johannesburg: World Summit on Sustainable Development.
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Meagans Law Meagan's Law Questions

Words: 5402 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92231459



Step 3: Discuss the Precipitating Event

After relationship is recognized, the emphasis goes to the family insights of the condition, the sequence of proceedings leading up to the predicament, and the issue that started out the sequence of events (Graham-Bermann, S.A., 2002). Consultations inspect when and how the disaster happened, the causal conditions, and how the family endeavored to covenant with it.

Step 4: Assess Strengths and Needs

The Family valuation of strengths and needs start right after and the goes on throughout crisis intervention. The crisis worker will start to draws conclusions that will regard the family's needs and strengths that are related to the present disaster and, with the family, assesses the prospective for recovery (Edleson, J.L.,1999). Client strong suit are tapped in order to make self-esteem better, while also providing skills and energy that is for problem-solving.

Step 5: Formulate a Dynamic Explanation

This next step really…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Appel, a.E., & Holden, G.W. (1998). The co-occurrence of spouse and physical child abuse: A review and appraisal. Journal of Family Psychology, 12, 578-599.

Babcock, J.C., Green, C.E., & Robie, C. (2004). Does batterer's treatment work? A meta-analytic review of domestic violence treatment. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1023-1053.

Beeman, S.K., Hagemeister, a.K., & Edleson, J.L. (1999). Child protection and battered women's services: From conflict to collaboration. Child Maltreatment, 4, 116-126.

Bragg, H.L. (2003). Child protection in families experiencing domestic violence. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved October 3, 2005, from http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/tools/usermanual.cfm
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Pocahontas Through the Ages Robert Tilton's Book

Words: 3298 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77729947

Pocahontas Through the Ages

Robert Tilton's book, Pocahontas: The Evolution of a Narrative, is ultimately a story about a story. Tilton's study does not largely concern itself with the real life individual whom we have come to know as Pocahontas, nor the primary texts from the early seventeenth-century that documented the facts of her life as they originally occurred. In addition, Tilton does not engage in pointed discussion about the principle players involved in the famous rescue of John Smith, such as, the Powhatan people or key members of the Virginia plantation. He also side-steps the question of the historical authenticity of the rescue story -- a story that largely came into doubt amongst nineteenth-century critics and writers from the northern states who struggled to weaken the power of the mythic narrative being exploited by southerners, around the time of the Civil ar. The story of Pocahontas, Tilton argues, has…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tilton, Robert S. Pocahontas: The Evolution of an American Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994.
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Eugene O'Neill's Mythic Re-Enactments

Words: 2061 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3968583

Mourning Becomes Electra

It must have come as something of a shock for the original audience of Eugene O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra in 1931 to take their seats, open their programs, and discover that this extremely lengthy trilogy of plays does not actually contain a character named "Electra." This may seem like an obvious point, but it is one worth considering as we approach O'Neill's American analogue to the Oresteia of Aeschylus -- the title essentially gives away the plot. Yet this would have been precisely the case with the original audience in fifth century Athens for a Greek tragedy: they arrived already knowing the myth of Electra or Oedipus or Medea, and so therefore what was being witnessed was, in some sense, a ritual re-enactment rather than a plot-driven narrative. Even the rare Greek tragedy that does introduce surprise into its plot, like the Orestes of Euripides, does so…… [Read More]

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Three Essays Critiquing Miller S Crucible

Words: 2895 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87738223

Crucible and hat I Have Learned

Arthur Miller's The Crucible is a dramatic, engaging work that challenges the reader/viewer to see beneath the "black and white" dichotomy by which the world is simplistically characterized via such "venerable" institutions in America as the "right" and the "left," the "conservative" and the "liberal" establishment, and the "patriot" and the "traitor" conception. In this play, Miller brings to the fore the fact that there can be and often are conflicting motives within every single human heart, a phenomenon that colors the way people act, interact, think, speak, and -- yes -- betray. At the heart of The Crucible is a drama of sexual tension and spite -- a girlish revenge twisted into something much more heinous by the cruel paroxysms of a community going mad with suspicion, condemnation, and holier-than-thou syndrome. It is a play that reflects one of the sinister secrets of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Murray, Edward. "The Crucible." In, Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Ed. by Harold

Bloom. NY: Bloom's Literary Criticism.

Popkin, Henry. "Arthur Miller's The Crucible." College English vol. 26, no. 2 (Nov.

1964): 139-46.
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Covenants in Genesis and Oedipus

Words: 2011 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43085606

How could that be true when that child was left in the woods to die?

Oedipus is calmed, but he still sets out to solve the murder-mystery and punish the man who committed regicide. As more details come to the surface, however, Oedipus starts to get a bad feeling. The evidence indeed points to him: Laius, he learns, was slain at the same crossroads where Oedipus took the lives of a group of men. as Laius among them? Apparently so…as Oedipus also learns that he was the babe whom Jocasta and Laius abandoned -- and indeed has grown up to ruin the house by killing his father and marrying and having children with his mother Jocasta. Jocasta (sensing that this might be the case) had pleaded for Oedipus to halt the investigation, but determined to know the truth, Oedipus called the herdsman who found him tied to a tree to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

New Revised Standard Version Bible. New York, NY: HarperCollins, 2009. Print.

Sophocles. Oedipus the King. Internet Classics Archive. Web. 10 Dec 2011.