Military Intelligence Essays (Examples)

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Intelligence the Creation and Performance

Words: 364 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5903504



By 1945, the OSS was abolished and by 1947 the National Security Act had completely transferred the task of espionage and intelligence from military to civilian hands ("United States Intelligence"). This transfer set the stage for the successes and failures of the U.S. intelligence community during the early Cold ar. It meant that U.S. intelligence was much more greatly coordinated and more aggressively implemented during that period to some apparent success. But it also meant that these new civilian agencies did not have the legacy of experience with espionage that existed within the military intelligence community. The end result was a higher degree of coordination during the early Cold ar, which improved the level of intelligence and communication and helped create the U.S.'s first true intelligence community.

orks Cited

United States Intelligence, History." Espionage Information: Encyclopedia of Espionage, Intelligence, and Security. 2007. 4 Oct. 2007 http://www.espionageinfo.com/Ul-Vo/United-States-Intelligence-History.html.… [Read More]

Works Cited

United States Intelligence, History." Espionage Information: Encyclopedia of Espionage, Intelligence, and Security. 2007. 4 Oct. 2007 http://www.espionageinfo.com/Ul-Vo/United-States-Intelligence-History.html.
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Intelligence Analysis Process Have Been Discussed This

Words: 1457 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40715020

intelligence analysis process have been discussed. This paper puts light on what basically is intelligence analysis and how can it be improved. It discusses ways via which intelligence analysis can be made more focused and more effective. It puts light on how better sharing and provision of information, collection and analysis of correct data and fact and figures can benefit the intelligence analysis process.

This paper also puts light on different psychological issues that are being faced by intelligence analysts and it also examines the ways through which analysts can overcome such hurdles.

Intelligence Analysis:

Before discussing how to improve intelligence analysis it is necessary to have proper understanding of the terms intelligence and analysis. Intelligence can be defined as an information which has added value in it whereas analysis is a process via which you can evaluate your intelligence, it helps you to understand a situation and then to…… [Read More]

References

Federation of American Scientists. (1996). Improving Intelligence Analysis. USA: FAS. Retrieved November 20, 2012 from http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/int012.html.

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crimes. (2011). Criminal Intelligence. New York: UNODC. Retrieved November 20, 2012 from  http://www.unodc.org/documents/organized-crime/Law-Enforcement/Criminal_Intelligence_for_Analysts.pdf .

Heuer, R.J. (1999). Psychology of Intelligence Analysis. USA: Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved November 21, 2012 from  https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/books-and-monographs/psychology-of-intelligence-analysis/PsychofIntelNew.pdf .

Heuer, R.J. (2005). Limits of Intelligence Analysis. Retrieved November 20, 2012 from http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/attachments/staff-college/20727d1273228985-ebo-sod-limits-intelligence-analysis-fpri-winter-2005-heurer-.pdf.
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Intelligence Community

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32072702

Human interaction provides a roadmap of how we think and process information. The human brain is bipolar with one side, being more feminine, incorporates the emotional and subjective types of data, where the left brain models the scenario and attempts to gather, dissect and disseminate that information for a better purpose. This modeling process can be very helpful in the military intelligence community to help organizations reach better conclusions and hence plan and operate in a more direct and impactful way.

The business world in its attempts to seek and gain a competitive advantage in many different ways and forms provides useful modeling techniques that can be used in any industry or scenario. elating these business models to the intelligence community requires a strong understanding of the words and phrases used within these models. Once a common language has been established, and all key terms are understood, the models can…… [Read More]

References

Businessballs.com (nd). Business Process Modeling. Viewed 2 Nov 2013. Retrieved from  http://www.businessballs.com/business-process-modelling.htm 

Grabo, Cynthia M. (2004) Anticipating surprise: Analysis for strategic warning. Lanham, MD: University Press of America. (ISBN: 9780761829522, download your copy from (http://www.ndic.edu/press/5671.htm )

Williams, D. (2013). What a Fighter Pilot Knows About Business: The OODA Loop. Forbes, 19 Feb 2013. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidkwilliams/2013/02/19/what-a-fighter-pilot-knows-about-business-the-ooda-loop/
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Military the Colonists' Most Revered Military Institution

Words: 1601 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64260428

Military

The colonists' most revered military institution was the militia, a model inherited from their forebears in England. The philosophical underpinnings of the militia model are easy to understand: "fear of a standing army," (Millet and Maslowski 1). A standing army can turn against its people, staging what now would be called military coups one after the other. During and especially after Independence, the validity, effectiveness, efficiency, and relevance of the militia model was called into question. This is why the United States Constitution eventually included the provisions for federalized systems of national security. Naturally, the existence of a standing army to "provide for the common defense" would be required. Independence required an organized military strategy against a powerful Empire; to protect the new nation, it was certain that the military would be necessary to preserve all that hard work. The Constitution therefore enabled the creation and maintenance of standing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boot, Max. "The New American Way of War." Foreign Affairs. 2003.

Jay, John. "The Federalist 2." Independent Journal. Oct 31, 1787.

Madison, James. "Federalist 41." Independent Journal. Jan 19, 1788.

Millet, Allen R. And Maslowski, Peter. For the Common Defense. Free Press, 1994.
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Military Draft

Words: 1195 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44145907

Military Draft

In arguing against reinstating the military draft in the United States, several things come immediately to mind. First among those, for anyone who has learned anything at all about the Vietnam ar, is that the draft can be devastating to society, causing upheaval at home as well as the return of bright, strong young men in body bags. David Halberstam, a journalist of considerable experience, wrote a book, The Best and the Brightest, about the sacrifice of these young Americans for precious little, if any, gain to this country or any other.

Moreover, that war lasted for years, ending in horrific scenes of people running through the streets of Saigon trying to leave any way they could. In the end, there was a Communist takeover despite the loss of all those young Americans.

In an article called "Thinking About the Draft," illiam Galston wrote:

In the wake of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Galston, William A. 2004. Thinking about the Draft. Public Interest, Wntr, 6ff. http://www.questia.com/.

Swomley, John. 2004. The Return of the Draft? The Humanist, July/August, 14ff. http://www.questia.com/.

Galston, W.A. 2004. Thinking about the Draft. Public Interest, Wntr, 61ff.

Ibid.
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Intelligence Pearl Harbor Final Judgement

Words: 345 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39476158

Short to military dances. The book is riddled with anecdotes such as these that indicate the military was ill prepared for a surprise attack, and in fact were arrogant in their ignorance.

In fact, Clausen's investigation showed the American military knew Japanese codes but ignored them in seeking intelligence; the agencies were unprepared for war or a surprise attack. As the author notes, "Although vested with high commands and responsibilities, they were surprised by the attack. They were unprepared for war. Thus, they were really guilty of criminal neglect of duty" (Clausen & Lee, 1992, p. 228). There was little joint action between the services during and after the attack, and that had a midnight message been decoded, it might have prevented the attack. In short, Pearl Harbor was a series of bungles that resulted in the most horrific naval losses the U.S. has ever endured.

eferences

Clausen, H.C. And…… [Read More]

References

Clausen, H.C. And Lee, B. (1992). Pearl Harbor: Final Judgement. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc.
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Military Flight and its Impact on the U S Military

Words: 4224 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71855404

-29 and -26 bombers were used by U.S. forces to decimate Korean cities through round-the-clock air war using incendiary bombs, delayed demolition explosives and an "infernal jelly" called napalm.[footnoteRef:38] Created secretly during World War II, napalm was basically a mixture of petroleum and a thickening agent, designed to fiercely adhere to the target and severely burn it. Though first used against enemy structures and humans in World War II, napalm was used in the Korean War to devastating effect.[footnoteRef:39] the results of the U.S. air war against North Korea were intentionally catastrophic: at the commencement of the War, North Korea had 22 major cities, 18 of which suffered at least 50% obliteration.[footnoteRef:40] Furthermore, the U.S. government seriously considered using the atomic bombs that had so decisively ended World War II in the Pacific Theater. Particularly in September and October of 1951, -29 bombers were used for multiple runs to drop…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bizony, Piers. The Space Shuttle: Celebrating Thirty Years of NASA's First Space Plane. Minneapolis, MN: Zenith Press, 2011.

Blight, James G., and Janet M. Lang. The Fog of War: Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2005.

Boyne, Walter J. Beyond the Wild and Blue: A History of the United States Air Force, 1947-2007, Second Edition. New York, NY: St. Martin's Press, 2007.

Chant, Christopher. The World's Greatest Aircraft. New York, NY: Crescent Publishing, 1991.
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Intelligence and Politics Origins and

Words: 2906 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77948109

Franks (along with the Bush war cabinet, including Vice President Dick Chaney) "met repeatedly" to plan the attack on Iraq. It was groupthink through and through. At the same time Bush was saying publicly he was "pursuing a diplomatic solution" (Hamilton, 2004), "intensive war planning" was going on during the whole year 2002. It "created its own momentum" in the administration, Hamilton wrote.

In oodward's book, which was recognized as conveying authentic details about the Bush war planning and strategies, he covers much of the pre-war discussions Bush had with top members of his administration, along with decisions Bush made on his own and with help from people like his Foreign Policy Advisor, Condoleezza Rice. But according to an excerpt from oodward's book, Bush waited until the last minute (among his top staff) to brief Secretary of State Colin Powell, who had not been an advocate of going to war,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bar-Joseph, Uri, and Levy, Jack S. 2009, 'Conscious Action and Intelligence Failure', Political Science Quarterly, vol. 124, no. 3, pp. 461-489.

Bar-Joseph, Uri. 1995, Intelligence Intervention in the Politics of Democratic States: The United States, Israel, and Britain. The Pennsylvania State University Press, University Park, Pennsylvania.

Gentry, John a. 2008, 'Intelligence Failure Reframed', Political Science Quarterly, vol. 123, no. 2, pp. 247-260.

Hamilton, William. 2004. 'Bush Began to Plan War Three Months After 9/11.' Washington Post, April 17, 2004, p. A01.
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Intelligence Community Reform Since the

Words: 3351 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61555606

After September 11th, President ush authorized the use of water boarding, as a way to gain knowledge of terrorist groups and their activities. The problem is that many of the civil rights-based groups believe that this is in violation of American law. When the people, who are interrogated (terrorists), are not American citizens and they want to do as much harm to the country as possible. Given the fact that these individuals, are more than likely hard core terrorists and posses knowledge about imminent terrorist activities, meant that the this technique would be utilized to obtain information. Even though this was successful and was used on limited number of people, the press and Congress continued to debate the issue. (Froomkin, 2010) This is troubling, because it undermines the activities of U.S. intelligence officials (who are trying to protect the nation). As they are inserted into a game of political chicken,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Congressional Reports. (2004). Go Access to Congress. Retrieved from: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/serialset/creports/intel_reform.html

Five Bombshells from Wiki Leaks Iraq War Documents. (2010). Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved from:  http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle-East/2010/1022/Five-bombshells-from-WikiLeaks-Iraq-war-documents/Details-of-torture-and-abuse 

Key Provisions. (2004). CNN. Retrieved from: http://articles.cnn.com/2004-12-08/politics/intelligence.key.facts_1_civil-liberties-board-intelligence-reform-bill-number-of-detention-beds?_s=PM:ALLPOLITICS

Overall U.S. Intelligence Budget Tops $80 Billion. (2010). LA Times. Retrieved from:  http://articles.latimes.com/2010/oct/28/nation/la-na-intel-budget-20101029
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Intelligence After World War II

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49884855

"

It was also a pivotal tool in discovering the ussian nuclear missile sites that sparked the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. The U.S. also gained spy satellites in 1960, and combined with the U-2 and other tools, American technological superiority began to assert itself. The spy satellites were a direct result of rocketry experimentation during and after World War II, and many German rocket scientists transplanted to America helped create the rockets that would launch the satellites. The scope of the intelligence operations was growing, and so were the technological advances that helped the agencies grow and learn more every day.

There are many who believe that factors such as the Cold War may help develop new agencies, but they have little to do with how the agencies evolve. Author Zegat continues, "The truth is that international factors such as the onset of the Cold War may catalyze the…… [Read More]

References

Andres, Christopher. For the President's Eyes Only. (New York: HarperPerennial), 1996.

Bamford, James. Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency from the Cold War Through the Dawn of a New Century. New York: Doubleday, 2001.

Painter, David S. The Cold War: An International History. London: Routledge, 1999.

Powers, Thomas. Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. New York: New York Review Books, 2002.
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Military Commission Act of 2006

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82318329

Military Commission Act 2006 was passed by the U.S. government to provide the law enforces additional powers and certain immunities while dealing with terrorists. However, this law has drawn severe criticism as well as a fair share of support from various sections of the society. The main argument against the law is that it has the potential for the government to suspend the right of habeas corpus for non-citizens which includes legal permanent residents who are in the U.S. custody. The president of the United States or the law enforcement agencies have gained the right to detain anyone in the U.S. - including U.S. citizens, and not assign any charge against them. This power has been awarded the designation of such individuals as enemy combatants or enemy combatants who are unlawful. The law also allows the president to decide what would constitute torture. Evidence that is obtained by coercion and…… [Read More]

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Military Ops Military-Led Reconstruction and Fiedler's Contingency

Words: 3209 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25016681

Military Ops

Military-Led econstruction and Fiedler's Contingency Theory

In light of the unfolding instability, violence and difficulty that characterized the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the United States military must reexamine its approach to the strategic invasion, occupation, reconstruction and power-handover that have evolved into a war-making template for the nation. Accordingly, the research conducted hereafter considers the need for a change in leadership orientation, using Fiedler's Contingency Theory as the lens for the literature review thereafter. The Findings drawn from the review of literature are presented in this account and, generally, provided confirmation of the pertinence of Fiedler's contingency theory to modern military strategy as well as the pertinence of Fiedler's Least-Preferred Coworker checklist to defining ideal military leadership. The reported findings connecting Fiedler's ideas with strategic and empirical documentation on applied military policy contribute to a number of policy recommendations. In particular, these policy recommendations revolve around two…… [Read More]

References

Conner, Maj. W.D. (2005). Understanding First in the Contemporary Operational

Environment. School of Advanced Military Studies; For Leavenworth Kansas.

Ellyson, L.M.; Gibson, J.H.; Nichols, M. & Doerr, A. (2012). A Study of Fiedler's

Contingency Theory Among Military Leaders. Allied Academies International
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Military -- Naval Support at

Words: 3000 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43785882

[footnoteRef:32] This lack of forces for other Pacific struggles generally weakened the Japanese war effort, as the Japanese were forced to fight those battles with insufficient men, weapons, ammunition and other related materiel. [27: Eric Hammel. Guadalcanal: Decision at Sea: The Naval attle of Guadalcanal, November 13-15, 1942. Pacifica, CA: Pacifica Military History, 1999, p. 346.] [28: Colin G. Jameson. "attle of Guadalcanal: 11-15 November, 1942." www.history.navy.mil Web site. 1944. http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/battleguadalcanal1942.htm (accessed March 18, 2013), p. 78.] [29: Robert Leckie. Challenge for the Pacific: Guadalcanal: The Turning Point of the War (Paperback). New York, NY: antam ooks, 2010, pp. 127-128.] [30: Mark Stille. USN Cruiser vs. IJN Cruiser: Guadalcanal 1942. New York, NY: Osprey Publishing, 2009, pp. 19-20.] [31: Leckie, p. 306.] [32: Ibid.]

The Allied victory at the Naval attle of Guadalcanal through the leadership of Vice Admiral William F. Halsey, the Southwest Pacific Theater commander, was also a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baer, George. One Hundred Years of Sea Power: The U.S. Navy, 1890-1990. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993.

Frank, Richard B. Guadalcanal: The Definitive Account of the Landmark Battle. New York, NY: Penguin Books USA, Inc., 1992.

Hammel, Eric. Carrier Clash: The Invasion of Guadalcanal and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons: August, 1942. St. Paul, MN: Zenith Press, an imprint of MBI Publishing Company, 2004.

-- . Guadalcanal: Decision at Sea: The Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, November 13-15, 1942. Pacifica, CA: Pacifica Military History, 1999.
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Intelligence Community A History of

Words: 3041 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54262272

This would create a reactionary agency which, rather than gathering intelligence to the extension of its security, would approach what would come to be known as the 'containment theory,' using whatever resources and tactics were at its disposal to deflect against the spread of communism.

At its time, the 1947 Act would be seen as projecting considerable vision. As one conservative think-tank reports on this idea, "until fairly recently, CIA considered its appropriate time horizon to be fairly long. It was, I believe, generally longer than the focus of either the Defense Intelligence Agency or the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR). The Directorate of Intelligence made forecasts in some areas that went out 20 years, and collectors and analysts tried to anticipate events 'over the horizon' -- situations policymakers did not then know they were likely to be worrying about in the future. CIA did this because…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Answers. (2009). United States Intelligence, History. Answers Corp. Online at  http://www.answers.com/topic/united-states-intelligence-history 

Bush, G.W. (2002). The National Security Strategy of the United States of America. The White House.

Federation of American Scientists (FAS). (2008). A Framework for Reform of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Federation of American Scientists. Online at http://www.fas.org/irp/gentry/chapter2.html

Johnson, L.K. (2007). Strategic Intelligence. Greenwood Publishing Group.
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Intelligence From 1936-1945 Key Analysis

Words: 334 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19356230

Shortly after, the Navy successfully cracked the Japanese military code in Operation Magic, which allowed U.S. forces to turn the tide of the war in the Pacific by 1942 ("United States Intelligence").

One of the chief actions taken during this period was the creation of the Office of Strategic Services by FDR in 1942. During orld ar II, the OSS coordinated all of the information through collection and analysis that was used for clandestine operations up until 1945 ("United States Intelligence"). The development of the OSS, though short-lived, demonstrates that the role of the intelligence community in United States foreign policy was growing significantly. Before this period, U.S. espionage was limited at best and primarily a domestic affair. By 1945, the role of the intelligence community had greatly expanded and become a more central part of life in the United States.

orks Cited

United States Intelligence, History." Espionage Information: Encyclopedia…… [Read More]

Works Cited

United States Intelligence, History." Espionage Information: Encyclopedia of Espionage, Intelligence, and Security. 2007. 4 Oct. 2007 http://www.espionageinfo.com/Ul-Vo/United-States-Intelligence-History.html.
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Intelligence Community Ic Is the Biggest and

Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24865660

Intelligence Community (IC) is the biggest and most multifaceted institution of its kind, consisting of sixteen semi-independent agencies with dissimilar, sometimes corresponding, spheres of accountability. Generally, it has demonstrated problematic to institute integrated direction over the IC. Ensuing major terrorist attacks like that of September 11, 2001, comprehensive intelligence restructurings were sanctioned, including legislature to authorize chief leadership by founding a Director of National Intelligence. Notwithstanding these modifications, opposition to central management still affects the IC to this day. The disaster in structural reform is poorly comprehended, as the literature does not intellectualize intelligence agencies predominantly as organizations.

The methodology recommended herein examines the progressive paths of agencies, which irradiates the organizational factors moving reform. Employing the structure of Historical Institutionalism in the new setting of intelligence agencies aids in explaining the difficulties seen in reform, posed by established interests and governmental cultures, damaging the realistic likelihood of centralized control…… [Read More]

References

Caswell Jr., Kenneth L. 'Establishment Of The National Maritime Intelligence Center: Understanding The Foundations Of Trust To Support A Collaborative Environment In Homeland Security' (2010).

Healy, Thomas F. 'Fighting Tomorrow's Fire Today: Leveraging Intelligence For Scenario-Based Exercise Design' (2014).

Pope, Robert S. 'Interagency Task Forces: The Right Tools For the Job' (2011).
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Military Technology Wins Wars Technology

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12452791

S. system of communication was responsible for far too many problems, including the presidential conception of the value of the leader, Nhu Ding Diem. Key factors in this war were the misuse of technology in the south and intelligent use of simple technology by the north. The Battle of Diem Bin Phu was a classic miscalculation when the French thought that artillery could not be brought against them through the jungle. The North Vietnamese did just that, manually hauling big guns on jungle trails and over mountains, then followed with ammunition on bicycles. In addition they hid the guns in tunnels and set off charges in the jungle to confuse the French as to the sources of shelling.

After the French left, the U.S. set up Nhu Ding Diem as president of South Vietnam. Between him and his brother, they alienated more than half the population in short order with…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=109396003

Best, Antony, Jussi M. Hanhim ki, Joseph a. Maiolo, and Kirsten E. Schulze. International History of the Twentieth Century. London: Routledge, 2004. Questia. 8 Oct. 2006 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=109396005.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106977474

Bull, Stephen. Encyclopedia of Military Technology and Innovation. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004. Questia. 8 Oct. 2006 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106977476.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9805116
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Intelligence Practical Exercise

Words: 2535 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14146722

Intelligence Practical Exercise

Geospatial Intelligence Analysis

GEOINT which means Geospatial Intelligence is a system which is used to analyse an environment for intelligence and operational purposes. (GEOINT Analysis, 2017).

Describe the Environment: Collect key data that defines the precise destination for the planned mission. Geographical, government and cultural limitations must be established. In most cases, the gathered data could consist of vectors, heights, natural landmarks such as rivers, mountains etc., longitude and latitude locations and several others. All these are the basic requirements of the GEOINT invention.

Outline the Effects of The Environment: Elaborate thoroughly on the mission location identified in the previous step. Locate and define its natural state, any existing structures and its cultural atmosphere. Account for all possible factors that might have an effect on a mission in the location such as roads, people, buildings, plants, climate, language, government, cultural divides or social factors. Add this new…… [Read More]

References

Ali Rathore, S. (2016). Brussels Attack - Lessons Learned. A JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND TERRORISM RESEARCH.

Brown, G., Carlyle, M., Salmeron, J., & Wood, K. (2005). Analyzing the Vulnerability of Critical Infrastructure to Attack and Planning Defenses. Tutorials inOperations Research, 102 - 123.

GEOINT Analysis. (2017). Retrieved from National Geospatial Intelligence Agency:  https://www.nga.mil/ProductsServices/GEOINTAnalysis/Pages/default.aspx 

International Nuclear Safety Group. (2010). The Interface Between Safety and Security at Nuclear Power Plants. Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency.
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Intelligence the Role of Scientific

Words: 2772 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38343941

More and more deep analysis can clarify the internal dynamics of the matter being studied, and in the long run to prediction, known as estimation. The reason for intelligence analysis is to make known to a precise decision maker the necessary significance of selected target information. Analysts should start with established facts, apply specialist knowledge in order to produce plausible but less certain findings, and even predict when the forecast is appropriately qualified. Analysts should not, however, engage in fortune telling that has no foundation in fact (Heuer, 1999). Not only is it poor science to claim absolute truth, but it also leads to the kind of destructive and distrustful debate we've had in last decade about global warming. The history of science and technology suggests that such absolutism on both sides of a scientific debate doesn't often lead to practical solutions (Botkin, 2011).

In the arrangement of science there…… [Read More]

References

A Compendium of Analytic Tradecraft Notes. (1997). Retrieved from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/cia/tradecraft_notes/contents.htm

Botkin, D.B. (2011). Absolute Certainty Is Not Scientific. Retreived from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204630904577058111041127168.html

Clauser, J. (2008). An introduction to intelligence research and analysis. Lanham, Maryland:

The Scarecrow Press.
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Intelligence the Importance of the

Words: 326 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22328487

hile some in the intelligence community may have resented the intrusion of Congress and calls for transparency, the investigations and oversight gave the CIA and the intelligence community a stronger moral footing in the U.S. democracy (DeYoung and Pincus). In a nation in which freedom and open-ness are core values, the continuance of an intelligence community that operates outside of those bounds and values is ethically unacceptable. The long-term health of the intelligence community in the nation was predicated on those Congressional investigations of the 1970s, which successfully infused the U.S. intelligence community with some degree of a "conscience."

orks Cited

DeYoung, Karen and Pincus, alter. "CIA Releases Files on Past Misdeeds." ashington Post 27 June 2007. 15 Oct. 2007 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/26/AR2007062600861.html.

Van agenen, James S. "A Review of Congressional Oversight." Central Intelligence Agency. 14 Apr. 2007. 15 Oct. 2007 https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/97unclass/wagenen.html.… [Read More]

Works Cited

DeYoung, Karen and Pincus, Walter. "CIA Releases Files on Past Misdeeds." Washington Post 27 June 2007. 15 Oct. 2007  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/26/AR2007062600861.html .

Van Wagenen, James S. "A Review of Congressional Oversight." Central Intelligence Agency. 14 Apr. 2007. 15 Oct. 2007  https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/97unclass/wagenen.html .
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Recurring Strategic Themes in the History of U S Intelligence

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82316876

U.S. Intelligence Stategy Histoy

The United States has always been a county that pided itself on the excellence of its militay excellenc and pecision. The defense and national foces have been at the heat of militay intelligence thoughout the yeas stating with 2001, in Septembe. Many govenment agencies, fo example, have joined foces with moe taditional militay foces to help combat both mino cime foces with those of a moe sophisticated body of cime thoughtout the United States and the wold. A histoical examination of the vaious elements elated to U.S. intelligence duing militay intense times eveal that moe attention to social o human concens duing the times involved might have ceated a geate dive towads caing fo those left destitute by a focus on militay o social concens duing Wold Wa II, the militay inquiies of the 1970s, and the invasion of Iaq stated in 2003. When examining the…… [Read More]

r, intelligence analysts had grossly underestimated Japanese capabilities and intentions, revealing a tendency to misunderstand Japanese actions by looking at them with American cultural biases. After the war, the resolve of America's leaders "never again" to permit another Pearl Harbor largely prompted the establishment of a centralized intelligence structure.

America's entrance into World War II created an immediate need for intelligence to support the warfighter. While the Army and the Navy maintained their own intelligence capabilities, none were prepared to provide the kind of support needed.1 To bolster this effort, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was created in June 1942, under the recently established Joint Chiefs of Staff to succeed the Coordinator of Information. William Donovan remained in charge of the reorganized unit. In addition to assuming the analytical role of its predecessor, the OSS was chartered to carry out clandestine operations against the Axis powers on a worldwide scale. It was not, however, readily accepted by the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), who remained skeptical of the value of OSS activities, and the new unit faced strong competition from the FBI and the Army's intelligence organization.

Usually glamorized as the dashing operations arm of the U.S. Army (with its well-known espionage exploits with the Resistance in Europe), the OSS' contribution to intelligence production has gone largely unnoticed. It was, however, one of the seven major intelligence producers and was an important training ground for a generation of intelligence analysts, as well as operatives. Decidedly different than the British system, the OSS established the tradition of putting analysts and operatives in the same organization. The difficulties, however, that the OSS had in establishing itself within the JCS structure reaffirmed
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North Korean Intelligence

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63291055

North Korean Intelligence:

Throughout its history, North Korea has continued to harass South Korea for as long as these countries have been separated by imaginary line and roadblocks. Since the country invasion upon South Korea in June 1950, North Korea has been a thorn in the daily lives of South Koreans. North Korea has been able to maintain such relations because of intelligence collection capabilities on the Korean Peninsula. The Democratic People's Republic of Korea or North Korea has a comprehensive intelligence gathering structure and several people conducting the intelligence operations. The three main agencies in the intelligence unit are the Ministry for Protection of State Security, Korean Workers Party, and the military intelligence arm.

North Korea's Intelligence Collection Methods:

One of the most evident aspects regarding North Korea is that the country seems to be in a constant mission to gather intelligence on the Korean Peninsula. This is largely…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Erickson, Ryan. "Foreign Intelligence Organizations: Mid Term; North vs. South Korea." Ryan

Erickson, 2009. http://ryanerickson.com/foreign-intelligence-organizations-mid-term-north-vs.-south-korea / (accessed December 15, 2011).

Jin, Han Young. "NSC's Detection of Cell-Phone Usage Is Strengthening." Daily NK

Brightening the Future of Korea, 2007. http://www.dailynk.com/english/read.php?cataId=nk01500&num=2792 (accessed December 15, 2011).
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Collection of Intelligence

Words: 1476 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14118507

U.S. intelligence refers to some of the most formidable and top intelligence available in the world. The United States has long led the way in the practice of gathering the most up-to -- the minute and esoteric intelligence regarding the actions of other countries, other armies and the other enemies. The current modern age has demonstrated the steady advancement in this regard of a range of sound technological tools which America has harnessed consistently for the effective pursuit of the most current and hard to gather intelligence.

Drones

The use of combat drones has been something that America has long used to gather intelligence and to engage in warfare with enemies or suspected enemies. However, in the last 12 months, the usage of drones has steadily decreased. "The number of drone strikes approved by the Obama administration on suspected terrorists has fallen dramatically this year, as the war with al…… [Read More]

References

Aljazeera.com. (2013, October). U.S. 'drone strike' kills senior Shabab members. Retrieved from aljazeera.com:  http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2013/10/drone-strike-kills-senior-shabab-members-20131028184651994308.html 

BBC. (2013, October). Pakistan says drones killed 67 civilians since 2008. Retrieved from BBC.co.uk:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24742037 

FAS.org. (n.d.). Military Intelligence Satellites. Retrieved from Fas.org: https://www.fas.org/irp/imint/docs/rst/Intro/Part2_26e.html

Galbraith, P. (2013, October). NSA spying on Europe gives the U.S. more intelligence, but not better. Retrieved from Theguardian.com:  http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/29/nsa-spying-europe-us-intelligence
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20th Century Intelligence Operations

Words: 877 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3308925

Signals intelligence (SIGINT) is an integral part of military strategy. eferring to the interception and decoding of enemy communications, SIGINT is the topic of Peter Matthew's 2013 publication, SIGINT: The Secret History of Signals Intelligence 1914-1945. Matthew focuses on the history of SIGINT until the Cold War. What makes SIGINT: The Secret History of Signals Intelligence unique is that the author presents the Axis point-of-view on SIGINT. As Matthew (2013) puts it, the author's aim is "to tell the other side of the Bletchley Park story," (p. 16).

A brief introduction describes what SIGINT is and how it evolved through technological and strategic changes. SIGINT is related to cryptography, because it encompasses the decoding of encrypted messages. The author points out that the book will be emphasizing Bletchley Park and Ultra, which were instrumental in bringing about the Allied Victory in the Second World War. Moreover, the author is interested…… [Read More]

References

Matthews, P. (2013). SIGINT. Gloucestershire: The History Press.
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Advancements in Military Technology and

Words: 1641 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33371527

They did not have any problems fighting with their enemies that had inferior technologies but when the United States came into the picture, Japan saw itself fighting not only a technologically superior enemy but one with information / intelligence gathering capabilities unbeknownst of in previous warfare history. In addition, Japan indeed woke up a "sleeping dragon" that not only was capable of evening the battlefield but mobilizing all efforts to withstand Japan's aggression in the pacific theatre of operations.

The Pacific war provided a venue to demonstrate the technological and information superiority of the United States against the Japanese Imperial forces. The use of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is the ultimate proof of these abilities but the deployment and utilization thereof could never have been possible without the people behind the invention, manufacturing, production, and implementation of these advanced military technologies and information superiority. Thus, it has…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Advameg, Inc. (2011). Science and technology -- World War II and the early Cold War. Retrieved August 7, 2011 from  http://www.americanforeignrelations.com/O-W/Science-and-Technology-World-war-ii-and-the-early-cold-war.html 

Grunden, W.E. (2005). Secret weapons and World War II: Japan in the shadow of big science. Wichita, KS: University Press of Kansas.

Harper, M.M., Jeffries, J.W., Tuttle, W.M. Jr., Lichtenstein, N., & Sitkoff, H. (2007, October). World War II and the American home front: A National Historic Landmarks theme study. Retrieved August 7, 2011 from http://www.nps.gov/nhl/themes/HomefrontStudy.pdf

Mercado, S. (2009, January 7). "Book review: Nisei linguists: Japanese-Americans in the military intelligence service during World War II by James C. McNaughton." Intelligence in Recent public literature. Retrieved August 7, 2011 from  https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/studies/vol-52-no-4/nisei-linguists.html
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Tactical Intelligence Involves the Ability to Determine

Words: 1010 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55961691

Tactical intelligence involves the ability to determine the actions of the opposition in terms of the mission to be accomplished. The opposition might, for example, take action to prevent the mission from being accomplished, or neglect certain actions for the same purpose. Tactical intelligence reveals or anticipates these actions, which then enables the leaders of the mission to take appropriate measures to promote the mission in question. In the military, tactical intelligence means that operatives analyze the data available and make the best possible decisions based upon the information that arrives. It is important to recognize that the effectiveness of such decision making is much enhanced by means of practical field experience. This is also an important component of training and communication. While doctoral documents are certainly important in terms of divulging the theoretical basis of operations, the dramatic communication of narratives such as OPEATION VEBAL IMAGE demonstrates in a…… [Read More]

References

Krulak, C.C. (1996, Oct. 4). Command and Control. U.S. Marine Corps. Retrieved from: http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/mcdp6.pdf

Moore, D.T. (2007). Critical Thinking and Intelligence. NDIC Press. Retrieved from: www.ndic.edu/press/2641.htm#

Sommer, D. (n.d.) What a Military Intelligence Education Can Teach You. Intelligence-Analyst. Retrieved from: http://www.intelligence-analyst.com/intelligence-education

Srivatsa, M., Paterson, K., Balfe, S., and Rohatgi, P. (2008, Oct. 27-31). Trust Management for Secure Information Flows. CCS. Retrieved from: www.usukitacs.com/papers/3961/ccs08final.pdf.
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Joining the Military After High

Words: 895 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42207920

Military training means more than the physical rigors of boot camp; new recruits also learn about the state-of-the-art developments in weaponry, surveillance, and information technology. A potential political career and professional military career are other potential outcomes of early military service and training.

Because of the vast educational and professional development opportunities available to the new and youthful recruit, military service also entails valuable personal and social skills development. The basic training endured by all new recruits taxes both body and mind. Getting into physical shape is one of the possible benefits of military duty. Military training is also notoriously rigorous and highly demanding. Senior officers require continuous respect and obedience and therefore the young recruits learn about deference to authority. Consequently, the new officer develops admirable self-restraint and self-discipline, traits that come in handy throughout the rest of their lives. Troubled teens or at-risk youth may therefore benefit most…… [Read More]

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Communicating Intelligence

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15823258

Intelligences

Intelligence

Intelligence document review

Document review:

Global Humanitarian Emergencies 1993-1994. (1994). CIA. etrieved:

http://www.foia.cia.gov/docs/DOC_0000649217/DOC_0000649217.pdf

Basic intelligence

"Basic intelligence concentrates mainly on descriptions, with a secondary focus on explanation and evaluation" (Major 1994: 7). The document "Global Humanitarian Emergencies 1993-1994" published by the CIA contains a review of different crises which occurred during the years 1993-1994. It contains basic intelligence in the form of facts and figures about countries around the world in what could be considered 'hot spots' of regional discord or which have been affected by serious, dramatic natural disasters. The document provides an overview of is purpose in its introduction, and then delves into various regional conflicts, including civil wars and natural events like droughts and floods. It identifies sources of humanitarian relief, such as the European Community and the UN and profiles their resources (Global Humanitarian Emergencies 1993-1994, CIA: 11).

The document provides specific regional profiles…… [Read More]

References

Global Humanitarian Emergencies 1993-1994. (1994). CIA. Retrieved:

http://www.foia.cia.gov/docs/DOC_0000649217/DOC_0000649217.pdf

Major. John. Communicating intelligence. Joint Military Intelligence College.
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US Intelligence Community

Words: 3284 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67757178

U.S. intelligence community is always expected to perform its duties according to some specified guidelines. This study examines the three themes found in the Pfeffer and Salancik book, "The External Control of Organizations," as applied to the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC). The paper reveals how the themes are applicable to the IC and their potential benefits to the IC. It is evident that the identified have proven to be useful to the community, as it has enabled it to adapt to the changing paradigms within the intelligence community.

The themes

First theme: the importance of the environment or the social context of organizations for understanding what decisions were made about issues ranging from whom to hire, the composition of boards of directors, and what alliances and mergers to seek.

From this theme, the leading obstacle in the realization of accountability in the U.S. intelligence community is the prerequisite of secrecy…… [Read More]

References

Banner, D.K., & Gagne?, T.E. (2006). Designing effective organizations: Traditional & transformational views. Thousand Oaks, CA.: Sage Publ.

Dobbin, F., & Schoonhoven, C.B. (2010). Organizational studies: The Stanford School 1970-2000. Bingley: Emerald.

Donaldson, L. (2010). American anti-management theories of organization: A critique of paradigm proliferation. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Hatch, M.J. (2011). Organizations: A very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.
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KGB Summary of Soviet Intelligence

Words: 1610 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50115287

S.-Soviet partnership lasted only a year and a half. With World War II over and the OSS disbanded in October 1945, the Cold War was looming on the horizon.

Conclusion

The research showed that the KGB was established in 1917 and was official deactivated in 1991. The research also showed that the KGB was not the stuff of the James Bond movies, but rather was characterized by an enormous sense of internal rivalry, a profound sense of paranoia and a desire on the part of many of its agents to defect to the West at their first opportunity. In this environment, it was little wonder that the KGB would resort to some of the tactics it used to achieve its mission, and it is reasonable to assert that current ussian intelligence agents will have taken a lesson or two from their KGB predecessors as they seek to maintain hegemony with…… [Read More]

References

Andrew, Christopher and Vasili Mitrokhin. 1999. The Sword and the Shield: The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB. New York: Basic Books.

Ebon, Martin. 1994. KGB: Death and Rebirth. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers.

Kalugin, Oleg D. 2002. "Window of Opportunity: Russia's Role in the Coalition against Terror." Harvard International Review 24(3), 56.

Ebon, Martin. 1994. KGB: Death and Rebirth. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, p. ix.
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Free Intelligence Working in the Field of

Words: 1809 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57549726

Free Intelligence

orking in the field of research analysis, a person must literally wade through thousands of pieces of information in order to determine the proper courses of action that should be undertaken under various circumstances. All research analysts work in either the government or in the private sector, most often in fields such as marketing wherein they acquire data based on consumers and consumption. From that data, they must determine what trends influence consumerism and how to best provide for their clients way that would induce consumers to purchase or utilize various goods and/or services (Roberts 2010). The governments of the world have always been responsible for accumulating and exposing information to the populations under their control. In the United States, there are laws which ensure that information is made available to any persons who demand it. Although, there is still information which is under the strict control of…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Baker, Seth M. (2011). "Information is Overrated." HappenChance. Word Press.

"Freedom of Information FAQS." (2011).

http://www.ico.gov.uk/Global/faqs/freedom_of_information_for_organisations.aspx#f3217F733-6B32-44C6-86D2-9FDC8A5AB7DB

McKellar, Ian (2011). "We Already Have Information, Why do We Need More Data?" Word
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Counter Intelligence Career Report Dia

Words: 1356 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70831691



To handle these responsibilities, intelligence agents need to possess certain skills and education. Most positions require at least a bachelor's degree, and degrees in politics or the sciences are recommended. Applicants need to possess strong writing skills, especially with analytical reports. Strong oral presentation skills are desired. Applicants need to be able to absorb and synthesize large amounts of information, to convey ideas thoroughly and logically, and be able to draw logical conclusions based on careful research and analysis. Computer knowledge and data entry are key skills. In addition, intelligence agents demonstrate leadership and show strong teamwork. Other requirements can include the ability to travel, familiarity with automated tools and systems, and foreign language skills. An applicant to any intelligence department must be able to pass a polygraph test, a background check to gain security clearance, and a psychological interview.

After achieving the right skill set and education, there are…… [Read More]

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Organized Crime Related intelligence

Words: 3194 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92951106

Organized Crime elated Intelligence

Those interested in global intelligence would recognize acronyms like CIA, KGB and MSS however for the sake of those who have no knowledge in this area, they mean Central Intelligence Agency -- United States, KGB (Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti) -- Soviet Union/ussia, and the Ministry for State Security (MSS) -- China and their activities are covered well by contemporary media. However, here we consider the less famous and covert intelligence agencies that operate currently or used to exist. A number of these agencies had specific job descriptions while the function of the rest were quite vague, however, all these agencies fulfilled their common responsibility of giving their superiors in-depth knowledge of a situation to aid their decisions (Powell, 2014)

The Frumentarii

The Frumentarii, who bear close similarities to the contemporary "secret police" like the SAVAK of Iran and the Kempeitai who existed in Japan during World War…… [Read More]

References

Greenberg, M. R., & Haass, R. (1996). Making Intelligence smarter. Council on Foreign Relations.

Juul, P. (2013, july 23). Adapting to the Future of Intelligence Gathering. Retrieved from American Progress:  https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/security/reports/2013/07/23/70281/adapting-to-the-future-of-intelligence-gathering/ 

Nomikos, J. M. (2008). Greek Intelligence Service: A Brief Description. European Journal of Intelligence Studies.

Powell, J. (2014, July 11). A Historical View of Intelligence Gathering: From the Kryptia to the CIA. Retrieved from  https://sofrep.com/37879/obscure-intelligence-agents-agencies-part-1/
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Nuclear Weapons an Analysis of the Intelligence

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44472699

Nuclear eapons

An analysis of the Intelligence Community's efforts against the Soviet Nuclear arsenal during the Cold ar

The Cold ar was one of the defining periods in U.S. history. Going to the moon was more about the culture and events that were occurring during the 1960s than anything else. hen Kennedy announced in 1961 that the U.S. would put a man on the moon, it was more about the Cold ar and showing up the Soviets than merely for scientific discovery. "So we decided to engage in this major scientific and technological endeavor and prove to the world that we were second to none," Roger Launius, the curator of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum stated (Lamb, 2012). However, the race to achieve a technological domination was not limited to space alone. Each country had developed nuclear technologies that were promoted because of the competition between the countries.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atom Central. (N.d.). The Cold War. Retrieved from Atom Central:  http://www.atomcentral.com/the-cold-war.aspx 

Lamb, R. (2012, October 6). Why Did We Go To the Moon? Retrieved from Discovery News:  http://news.discovery.com/space/private-spaceflight/why-did-we-go-to-the-moon.htm 

Tarantola, A. (2013, November 8). 10 Cold War Weapons That Terrified U.S. Military Intelligence. Retrieved from Gizmodo:  http://gizmodo.com/10-cold-war-weapons-that-terrified-u-s-military-intell-1459669357 

Valois, K. (1970). The Cuban Missile Crisis: A World in Peril. Auburndale: History Compass.
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Varnava 2012 Commented on the Multifaceted Intelligence

Words: 4590 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2365970

Varnava (2012) commented on the multifaceted intelligence attributes that went into making the construct of British Intelligence gathering in Cyprus, a successful vocation in World War II. This review aims to explore the implications of the role played by local, civil populace in thwarting attempts by military in allowing intelligence inputs through counter-espionage on British and Middle East territories. The review revisits some work on the First World War British efforts on counter espionage measures in Cyprus after 1916. The work will add to the literature on intelligence activities, attempted during the WW1 (Varnava, 2012).

According to Constantinou's (2013) paper, the role played by diplomatic strategies that extrapolates intelligence-gathering process makes it successful. Diplomacy is a means of making skilled, persistent advocacy towards obtaining solutions of complex situations. It fails to make most of its capabilities. The epistemology (of diplomacy) in the context of humanism, above the dimension of intelligence…… [Read More]

References

Alfonso, K.L. (2010). Femme fatale 2010. AIR AND SPACE POWER JOURNAL MAXWELL AFB AL.

Blair, J. (2011). Hesitation kills: A female Marine officer's combat experience in Iraq. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Carreiras, H. (2006). Gender and the military: Women in the armed forces of western democracies. Routledge.

Clandestine Women: Spies in American History (2014) National Women's History Museum. Retrieved from:  https://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/spies/8.htm
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Central Intelligence Agency and Its Purpose

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77324291

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was founded in1947 out of the Office of Strategic Services, or OSS, and its purpose was to act as a civilian foreign intelligence agency that dealt with threats to American interests abroad. hile initially born at the onset of the Cold ar era in which espionage and the threat of nuclear war was high, the CIA has developed over the years to be something more than its initial mandate set out. By participating in various black operations geared towards effecting regime change, the CIA quickly became known as a cloak and dagger agency very much in the tradition of the OSS.

The organizational structure of the CIA is situated in five directorates, all of which help to coordinate intelligence: the Directorate of Digital Innovation, of Analysis, of Operations, of Support, and of Science and Technology. The Director of the CIA oversees all of these directorates and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tyler, Patrick. A World of Trouble: The White House and the Middle East. NY: Farrar,

Straus and Giroux, 2010. Print.

Weiner, Tim. Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA. NY: Anchor Books, 2008.

Print.
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Military Imparts in an Individual Many Important

Words: 4677 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82966905

military imparts in an individual many important qualities that they carry out into the real world. These qualities are leadership, versatility, character, among others. The military is an excellent place to learn, to grow, and to better one's self. Many people have had long and successful careers that they earned only through being in the military. It teaches a person the importance of hard work, communication, and bravery.

The military allows for transition into a multitude of careers, especially career in the government. And in sectors where leadership skills are rare and sought after, the military prepares one to establish a secure foothold in these areas. Non-for-profits, volunteer organizations, and businesses all require strong and fearless leaders with clear direction and focus. The military offers exactly what a person needs early on to achieve anything they set out for. Six sections will be examined to show just how military lessons…… [Read More]

References

Ambrose, S.E. (1983). Eisenhower. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Burns, J.M., & Dunn, S. (2004). George Washington. New York: Times Books.

Cunningham, J.B., & Lischeron, J. (1991). Defining Entrepreneurship. Journal of Small Business Management, 29(1), 45. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8691.1993.tb00073.x

Gowel, D. (2012, March 1). 5 reasons the military is the best training for entrepreneurs | SmartBlogs [Web blog post]. Retrieved from https://smartblogs.com/leadership/2012/03/01/5-reasons-the-military-is-the-best-training-for-entrepreneurs/
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Military Monograph

Words: 1940 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27771529

Monograph

One of the great challenges the military faces is remaining current and preparing the current and future generations of soldiers for inevitable shifts to the geopolitical environment, technological changes, and shifts in both domestic and foreign policies. The importance of preparing officers for the new realities of unpredictable environments and non-state actors cannot be underestimated.[footnoteef:1] The roles and goals of the AMSP and SAMS have not changed. These educational programs provide the requisite advanced and specialized knowledge to foster critical thinking and strategic analysis among military leaders. What must be remembered, however, is the need for organizational awareness and the willingness to change. [1: Edward B. Bankston, Boards vs. Bureaucracies: Field Grade Officer Education in the United States Army, 1946-1985. School of Advanced Military Studies Monograph, 2013.]

This analysis points out the importance of analyzing post-Cold War realities and adapting AMSP and SAMS programs accordingly to include such things…… [Read More]

References

Bankston, Edward B., Boards vs. Bureaucracies: Field Grade Officer Education in the United States Army, 1946-1985. School of Advanced Military Studies Monograph, 2013.

Beck, William T., Developing Army Leaders Through CGSOC/AMSP and BCTP. School of Advanced Military Studies Monograph, 2005.

Goble, Jeffrey J., Wants and Needs: SMAS' Relationship with the Army. School of Advanced Military Studies Monograph, 2008.

McKinley, Matthew R., An Assessment of the Army Officer Education System from an Adult Learning Perspective. School of Advanced Military Studies Monograph, 2005.
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Military Strategies Employed by Alexander the Great

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82746280

military strategies employed by Alexander the Great and how he was able to skillfully use his political and military skills in conquering most of Europe and Asia in his time.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon reigned as the king of Macedonia from 356-323 B.C. He was born to King Philip and his third wife, Olympias in July 356 BC in Pella, Macedonia. He is remembered as one of the greatest military genius in history. During his lifetime, he conquered much of world, since his main ambition was to conquer the world and create world monarchy.

Alexander, was the strong, handsome commander leading his army using the best military strategies of his time. His army was armed with sarisses, the fearful five and half meter long spears. He was the first great conqueror to invade Greece, Egypt, and India. He was popular for creating ethnic syncretism between the Macedonians and the conquered…… [Read More]

References

Arrian. Campaigns of Alexander, The (~90-172 A.D.)

J.F.C. Fuller. Generalship of Alexander the Great (1958)

J. Keegan. Mask of Command, The (1987)

Lisa Jardine, Worldly Gods: A New History of the Renaissance (London: Macmillan, 1996) pp. 67-68
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Intelligence Community DNI

Words: 1376 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83423758

Homeland Security Intelligence

With the advent of new technologies, human lifestyle is improving and people have found better ways to achieve their goals. The impact of technology is found at national level and many security threats are emerged. Keeping in view the possibility of increased security challenges in the time to come, there is serious need to revise the security policies and bring them all together under information communication strategy so that reporting chain and effective control can be determined.

Policy Memorandum of Homeland Security Intelligence

Homeland Security is the matter of national integrity and must be catered for as the utmost priority of government officials and policy makers. The implementing authorities should align their practices with the objective of protecting national integrity and give the feedback to policy makers if there is any issue of concern.

It can be argued that the establishment of a country consists of high…… [Read More]

References

Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland. 2006. "The Future of Intelligence Analysis." Accessed February 28, 2013. http://www.cissm.umd.edu/papers/files/future_intel_analysis_final_report1.pdf

Information Sharing Governance Board. 2008. "Information Sharing Strategy." Accessed February 28, 2013. http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/dhs_information_sharing_strategy.pdf

NWC. 2006. "Homeland Security and Law Enforcement." Accessed February 28, 2013. http://faculty.ncwc.edu/TOConnor/427/427lect05.htm

United States Intelligence Community. 2008. "Information Sharing Strategy." Accessed February 28, 2013. http://www.fas.org/irp/dni/iss.pdf
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Military Forces in Mexico American

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32678018

Particularly, many democrats and republicans expressed their dismay about the fact that the ush administration did not notify or seek congressional input while the policy was being developed. However, as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson, who actually drafted the 'Merida initiative' says, "Although it [Merida] was proposed by a Republican administration, it was passed by a Democratic [party-controlled] Congress." [Jim Fischer, 2009]

Some policy analysts from Mexico have expressed their concern that controlling drug trafficking in Mexico would be better achieved if the U.S. takes active measures to control the arms trafficking from across its borders into Mexico. Gen. Javier del Real Magallanes, who is in command of the northeastern states such as Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, and San Luis Potosi says, "If there are no weapons, there's no violence. These arms aren't from Mexico; they're from the other side." [Laura Starr, 2007]. Sharing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Colleen W. Cook, Oct 2007, 'CRS Report for Congress: Mexico's Drug Cartels', retrieved Apr 22nd, 2010, from,  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL34215.pdf 

2) Bernd Debussman, 'Latin America: Mexico Drug War Update', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from, http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/604/mexico_drug_war_update

3) Manuel Roig-Franzia, 'U.S. Guns Behind Cartel Killings In Mexico', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from,  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/28/AR2007102801654.html 

4) Inside USA, 'Mexico's Drug', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyDHNeJxazU
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Intelligence Community

Words: 788 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39202209

Intel Organization

Pfeffer & Salanick (1978) proposed many important ideas in their examination of management theory's incorporation of external elements and controls. While the information contained in this reading are useful in some manner, their perspective remains incomplete and one sided in many ways. While it is true that the external controls and exchanges between organizations have a direct and almost obvious impact on the cumulative results, the author's ignore the requirement for balance and reason within the total concept of control.

While federal intelligence agencies such as the CIA certain would benefit from taking the authors' recommendations when they wrote " the key to organizational survival is the ability to acquire and maintain resources, " (p.2), it still feels that something even more important is left out. The CIA can and does acquire incredibly large amounts of data and information, or resources, however a point of diminishing returns awaits…… [Read More]

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intelligence handling processes

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37715243

gathering and using knowledge as a basis for making decisions in formal settings is an old one. If one is to gain advantage over their rivals, it is essential to gather updated knowledge that is also accurate with regard to what they intend to do and their capabilities. The principle applies across a wide range of fields including military strategies, politics, criminal intelligence circles and business. Further, it is a continually evolving process. It has been changing in response to socio-cultural factors, higher advanced analytical skill requirements, organizational demands, and even technology. Review of the roots of intelligence and the analytical procedures as a pre-occupation and profession is a consultative activity. Such analysis of the background of intelligence processes helps us to understand the past, the present and help anticipate the future. We also learn, in the process, that intelligence gathering is an ever evolving field. Consequently, if the practice…… [Read More]

Bibliography

CIA. (n.d.). Signals Intelligence Activities. Retrieved from cia.gov:  https://www.cia.gov/library/reports/Policy-and-Procedures-for-CIA-Signals-Intelligence-Activities.pdf 

Erickson, M. H. (1929). Study of the Relationship Between Intelligence and Crime. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.

Manget, F. F. (2006). INTELLIGENCE AND THE CRIMINAL LAW SYSTEM. STANFORD LAW AND POLICY REVIEW, 415.

Ratcliffe, J. H. (2007). Integrated Intelligence and Crime Analysis. Police Foundation.
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Intelligence in the Battle of the Atlantic

Words: 1694 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26424095

Battle of the Atlantic

The changing nature of America's involvement in orld ar II is an interesting strategic story because the American people were weary of war and during the time Hitler was taking over one European nation after another. After the attack on Pearl Harbor of course Americans were fully ready to go to war with Japan. But the situation in Europe was not as well defined as far as American involvement. And the Battle of the Atlantic was, in reality, a "…battle to deliver supplies" and in fact "…the future prosecution of the war" depended on the success of this battle (www.ibibilo.org). This paper reviews the strategies employed by the U.S. And Great Britain, the technologies used, and other aspects of the Battle of the Atlantic.

hy was the Battle of the Atlantic important?

The importance of winning this battle -- which the allies won, with an enormous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allied Communications Intelligence (2000) Battle of the Atlantic, Vol. I. December 1942-

May 1945. The U-Boat and Allied Naval Communication Intelligence. Retrieved February 25, 2014, from  http://www.ibiblio.org .

Destroyer Escort Historical Museum. (2001). Destroyer Escorts in the Atlantic. Retrieved February 25, 2014, from  http://www.ussslater.org .

Hickman, K. (2014). World War II: Battle of the Atlantic. About.com. Retrieved February 25,
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Military Participation of African-Americans Especially

Words: 2775 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85316353

His plan to create a black regiment in the South failed, but black regiments were created during the war, and some of them were vital to certain battles and victories.

Perhaps the most notable black regiment formed during the war was the 1st hode Island egiment, which has become legendary in the fight for freedom. Colonel Christopher Greene commanded the egiment, and it was one of only three black regiments to fight during the war. In fact, many historians feel the war might have ended sooner if more regiments like the 1st hode Island had been formed and utilized. The Kaplans note, "Colonel Christopher Greene's First hode Island egiment distinguished itself for efficiency and gallantry throughout the war -- perhaps the war would have ended sooner if its example had been heeded" (Kaplan, and Kaplan 1989, 64). hode Island was unable to fill its quota of fighting men for the…… [Read More]

References

Bradley, Patricia. 1998. Slavery, Propaganda, and the American Revolution. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

Dunmore, Lord. 1775. Lord Dunmore's Appeal to the Slaves of Virginia (1775).

Editors. 2005. Black Loyalists: Our History, Our People. Government of Canada's Digital Collections. http://collections.ic.gc.ca/blackloyalists/story/our_story.htm

Kaplan, Sidney, and Emma Nogrady Kaplan. 1989. The Black Presence in the Era of the American Revolution. Revised ed. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.
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Military Sketch of Camp Pangatian Rescue

Words: 533 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98717991

Captain Pajota's Course Of Action Mission Statement And Sketch

Mission Statement

Captain Pajota aims to assist the Allied extraction of POWs from Pangatian Camp by blocking off a mile section road to the prison to allow the Allies access to attack the camp without interference from more Dokuho 359 forces coming in from General Tomoyuki Yamashita's order of Commander Oyabu's Dokuho 359 towards Cabanatuan City.

Commander's Intent

The purpose of the operation is to assist Allies in the removal of POWs and to show clear weaknesses in the heart of Japanese territory in the Phillipines. The much larger Dokuho 359, assisted with six tanks, is a large force. Holding it off in order to allow the extraction of POWs will show weaknesses in the Japanese defense and increase Allied resolve in the region.

Decisive Operation (DO)

Block the Japanese Imperial Army's Dokuho 359, including 800 men and six tanks, at…… [Read More]

References

King, Michael. (1985). Rangers: Selected Combat. Leavenworth Papers No. 11. Combat Studies Institute.
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MDMP and Military Strategy

Words: 4751 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48822826

Military Decision Making Process Exam (MDMP)

Movement Estimate of the Operations

Commander's Critical Information equirements (CCIs)

Commander's Judgment

COA Analysis, Comparison & ecommendation

Movement Estimate of the Operations

The POW Camp

The planning for the liberation of American and Allied prisoners held in a compound at Pangatian is to be done at central Luzon. The camp was five miles east of Cabanatuan.

The primary hindrance to the plan would be the rapid and frequent movement of the Japanese troops on the highway in front of the camp where the PoWs were held. The compound, in addition to being behind enemy lines was also the mainstay of Japanese troop movements. The Japanese retreating troops moved at night and rested during the day and the POW camp is one such resting place. The roads in the Pangatian area are regularly used by Japanese tanks. Dense troop concentrations are also reported in the…… [Read More]

References

Barbier, M. And O'Donnell, P. (2002). Beyond Valor: World War II's Rangers and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat. The Journal of Military History, 66(3), p.897.

Kem, J. (2009). Campaign planning. Fort Leavenworth, Kan.: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Dept. Of Joint, Interagency, and Multinational Operations.

King, M. (1985). Leavenworth Papers Number 11. Rangers. Selected Combat Operations in World War II. Ft. Belvoir: Defense Technical Information Center.

Kirkpatrick, C. (1990). An unknown future and a doubtful present. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army.
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Dangerous Mismanagement

Words: 6133 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99577375

Intelligence Failures

In an ever increasingly complex governmental infrastructure, the importance of communication, mission and strategy are of the utmost importance. The Department of Defense (DOD) and all of its law enforcement agencies are in a pervasive struggle to attain both accurate and actionable intelligence in order to perform their duties to the best of their capabilities and intentions.

The purpose of this research paper is to explore the failure of the intelligence process due to extraneous levels of bureaucratic organization. This essay will attempt to explain the many failures of the Department of Defense law enforcement entities as a result of this type of organization.

In order to understand this argument, this essay will first look at the problem itself and try to identify the root cause of these failures. Past failures of intelligence gathering will be examined to help contextualize the argument and give credence to the idea…… [Read More]

References

Chesney, R. (2011). Military-Intelligence Convergence and the Law of Title 10/Title 50 Debate. J. Nat'l Sec. L. & Pol'y, 5, 539.

Clapper, J. (2011). How 9/11 Transformed the Intelligence Community. The Wall Street Journal 7 Sep 2011. Retrieved from http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424053111904537404576554430822300352

Foust, J. (2013). Throwing the Intelligence Community Under the Bus. Beacon Journal 29 Oct 2013. Retrieved from http://www.beaconreader.com/joshua-foust/throwing-the-intelligence-community-under-the-bus

Gusterson, H. (2011). Atomic Escapism? American Scientist, Jan -- Feb 2011. Retrieved from  http://www.americanscientist.org/bookshelf/pub/atomic-escapism
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Foreign and Domestic Intelligence the

Words: 6712 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5885348

S. directly. Evidently, the long-term objectives indirectly face the smooth running of the U.S. government. Priority should be given to those aspects that will pull the resources of the country to extreme levels. The U.S. As a super-power is privileged when tackling issues affecting other nations; it is mandated to help developing long-term solutions.

Long-term also implies that the impacts and effects need to be widespread in order to maintain balance and ensure the prosperity of all sectors is recognized. The above long-term objectives are issues that need time and resources in order to be able to resolve the issue that affects the stability of these countries among other issues. The Soviet Union, for example, is crying to have political relations with ussia. This means that the military forces will be deployed to this country. However, the negotiation process is hefty and requires time and adequate resources in order to…… [Read More]

References

Bruce, J. & Bennett, M. (2008). "Foreign Denial and Deception: Analytical Imperatives,"

Analyzing Intelligence: Origins, Obstacles, and Innovations. Washington, DC:

Burch, J. (2008). The Domestic Intelligence Gap: Progress Since 9/11? Homeland Security

Affairs, 2.
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Enemy of the U S Military the United

Words: 1181 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25832953

Enemy of the U.S. Military

The United States military is currently wrapping-up two full-scale wars in which its performance was tested in ways previously unforeseen. One particular aspect of the military's standard operating procedure which has become a problem is its dependence and use of PowerPoint presentations to organize information regarding battlefield operations. For instance, in the book Fiasco, by Thomas icks, a tale is recounted how the general who actually led the ground forces in the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Gen. David McKiernan, "grew frustrated when he could not get Gen. Tommy . Franks, the commander at the time of American forces in the Persian gulf region, to issue orders that stated explicitly how he wanted the invasion conducted, and why." (Bumiller, 2010) The problem lay with General Franks' complete reliance on PowerPoint presentations containing slides which, while seeming to explain a point, instead contained vague and often confusing…… [Read More]

References

Bumiller, Elisabeth. (26 April 2010). "We Have Met the Enemy and He is PowerPoint."

New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/world/27powerpoint.html
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Open Source Intelligences Robert M

Words: 2211 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83690517

The F-16s can be used if bigger warheads are necessary. The F-16s can carry bunker buster missiles, which can penetrate anything that might be protecting the nuclear sites. A-10s are fighter planes that are used against tanks and in close combat support.

4. Have the political options run out?

As it relates to the issue of Iran obtaining nuclear weapons, the political options have not run out. This statement is made despite the fact that any hope for a peaceful resolution to this problem seems unlikely. The Iranian President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, has made a number of negative statements against the United States and Israel in the last five years. His statements reveal a clear, deep hatred against these so-called "Zionist" countries. He has even gone so far as to vow that a new Middle East will arise, one without the presence of Israel. However, his comments seem to be based…… [Read More]

References

Balad Airbase. (2010). Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved from:  http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/iraq/balad-ab.htm 

Berman, Ilan. (2007). The Iranian Nuclear Crisis: Latest Developments and Next Steps.

Retrieved from: http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/profile/Berman_Ilan

Clark, Robert M. (2003). Intelligence Analysis: A Target-Centric Approach. Washington,
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RFID Technology in the Military Radio Frequency

Words: 4247 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54788131

FID Technology in the Military

adio frequency identification (FID)

adio frequency identification (FID) is a term used to refer to an electronic system that transmits in form of serial numbers that are distinct, the identity of a person or an object in a wireless manner with the aid of radio frequencies. The FID is categorized under the wider automatic identification technologies category (Association of Automatic Identification and Mobility, 2011). The FID are intelligent bar codes that are connected to a networked system and can communicate back and forth with it.

The FID is nowadays used all around us, from the supermarket items to the pet ID tags, toil booths, gas stations and several security items. Unlike the predecessor UPC bar-code, the FID does not require any contact or line of sight in order for communication to be enabled between the tagged item and the centre of the system. The data…… [Read More]

References

Army of Robots, (2011). Development of Military Robots. Retrieved September 10, 2010 from  http://www.armyofrobots.com/discussion-development-military.html 

Association of Automatic Identification and Mobility, (2011). Technologies: RFID / What is

RFID? Retrieved September 10, 2010 from http://www.aimglobal.org/technologies/RFID/what_is_rfid.asp

Brian F, (2011). Pros and Cons of RFID Technology. Retrieved September 10, 2010 from http://ezinearticles.com/?Pros-and-Cons-of-RFID-Technology&id=522015
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Women in the Military Since

Words: 3046 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65692192

).

The Navy also established institutions to particularly cater for women wishing to enter the service. It recruited women into the Navy Women's eserve, which was known as

Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES), in 1942. More than 80,000 such women served the military in occupations relating to communications, intelligence, supply, medicine and administration. The Marine Corps Women's eserve was created in 1943. Women in this establishment held jobs such as clerks, cooks, mechanics, and drivers. An increasing number of women served in these positions, among others in nursing and the Coast Guard -- there were more than 400,000 American military women serving both in the United States and overseas during the Second World War. Although many of these women served close to combat stations, the work of the majority involved non-combat duties.

After the World Wars

The Korean War

When the Korean Conflict broke out in 1950, President…… [Read More]

References

Norris, Michelle. Roles for Women in U.S. Army Expand. NPR, Oct. 1, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14869648

Women in Military Service for America Memorial Foundation, Inc. Highlights of Military Women. 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.womensmemorial.org/Education/timeline.html 

Women in the U.S. Army. Generations of Women Moving History Forward. 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.army.mil/women/index.html
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Digitization of the U S Military

Words: 1732 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39058214



Brian inston, "9 'smell the Tulips': the Internet, Neo-Liberalism and Millenarian Hype," in Access Denied in the Information Age /, ed. Stephen Lax [book online] (New York: Palgrave, 2001, accessed 10 December 2008), 166; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102376364;Internet.

Stephen Lax, ed., Access Denied in the Information Age / [book online] (New York: Palgrave, 2001, accessed 10 December 2008), 5; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102376197;Internet.

Michael H. Hoffman, "Corporate arriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry," Parameters 34, no. 3 (2004) [database online]; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007239156;Internet; accessed 10 December 2008.

Joshua Kurlantzick, "Outsourcing the Dirty ork: The Military and Its Reliance on Hired Guns," the American Prospect, May 2003 [database online]; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001916974;Internet; accessed 10 December 2008.… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102376181

Lax, Stephen, ed. Access Denied in the Information Age / . New York: Palgrave, 2001. Book online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102376197.Internet. Accessed 10 December 2008. www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007239156

Hoffman, Michael H. "Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry." Parameters 34, no. 3 (2004): 153+. Database online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007239156.Internet. Accessed 10 December 2008. www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001916974

Kurlantzick, Joshua. "Outsourcing the Dirty Work: The Military and Its Reliance on Hired Guns." The American Prospect, May 2003, 17+. Database online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001916974.Internet. Accessed 10 December 2008. www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022533831

Peters, Charles. "Tilting at Windmills." Washington Monthly, September 2007, 7+. Database online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022533831.Internet. Accessed 10 December 2008. www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002396215
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Civil-Military Relations Civil Military Relations

Words: 2314 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53546597



However in those days, the progress was even slower and there was deeper concern about the possibility of complete transition. Samuel Huntington's path-breaking book, Political Order in Changing Societies (1968) has been by far the most well received and comprehensive book on the subject of civilian military relations. Huntington studied the conditions in Latin America and found that in underdeveloped countries, militaries were usually more powerful because society cannot access the government and hence support military's interference. Middle classes then "compel the military to oppose the government" and restore the status quo ante. Military may be powerful but Huntington felt that it was the organizational structure that can be blamed for coups but instead the social structure and thus "Military explanations do not explain military intervention," he argued.

By the end of the 1970s, even more literature appeared on the scene to explain civil military relations and to study the…… [Read More]

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Private Military Companies Iraq Illustrate a Trend

Words: 3262 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96504220

private military companies Iraq illustrate a trend warfare? -No, Historical reasons great empires employed a large number mercenaries.-What reasons, -Type firms, divided types- type spear

Private military companies

Today's society is more challenging and dynamic than it has ever been. And this trend is manifested within the military sector as well. Here, the employees in the division have to be better motivated in order to risk their lives and this motivation has to be complex, and include both financial and non-financial incentives. While the major non-financial incentive would be the sense of fighting to protect one's country, the financial incentive has to be substantial and significantly larger than that of any other category of employees.

The modern day army then integrates technologic developments to improve the nature and outcome of its operations. It as such strives to answer the more and more complex demands of the contemporaneous society and, in…… [Read More]

References:

Adebajo, A., Sriram, C.L., 2000, Messiahs or mercenaries? The future of international private military services, International Peacekeeping, Vol. 7, No. 4

Avant, D., 2006, Private military companies and the future of war, Foreign Policy Research Institute, http://www.fpri.org/enotes/200604.military.avant.privatemilitarycompanies.html last accessed on May 27, 2011

Beutel, M.D., 2005, Private military companies: their emergence, importance and a call for global regulation, Northwich University, http://princess.digitalfreaks.org/thesis/beutelmdthesis.pdf last accessed on May 27, 2011

Carafano, J.J., 2008, Private sector, public wars: contractors in combat-- Afghanistan, Iraq, and future conflicts, Greenwood Publishing, ISBN 0275994783
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Comparing Sun Tzu With Other Military Greats

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12365252

Sun Tzu and Military Classics

Sun Tzu believed in freedom of action, mobility, surprise, deception and indirect attacks rather than frontal assaults. His method was always to "entice the enemy, to unbalance him, and to create a situation favorable for a decisive counter-stroke," while avoiding sieges and prolonged wars of attrition (Harvey, 2008, p. xlii). This was the opposite type of strategy from the commanders of the First World War or the American Civil War, who hurled masses of men against powerful defensive positions and inflicted mass casualties on their armies for no real purpose. Basil Liddell Hart, who was "horrified by the waste" of World War I, agreed with Sun Tzu that the indirect approach was superior, particularly using the mobility that tanks and air power provided (Harvey, p. xxxv). Most of the great commanders of history, like George Washington, Bernard Montgomery, Douglas MacArthur and George Patton have followed…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Harvey, R. (2008). Maverick Military Leaders: The Extraordinary Battles of Washington, Nelson, Patton, Rommel, and Others. New York: Skyhorse Pub Co Inc.

Sun Tzu. The Art of War. History.com  http://www.history.com/topics/the-art-of-war
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Effect of Deployment on Military Families

Words: 4773 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 398306

military deployment affects military families. The writer explores the many differences between deployed and non-deployed families and examines some of the things being done to ease the stress and problems that deployment presents. There were 10 sources used to complete this paper.

Americans are waiting with anxious anticipation as the federal government attempts to convince the United Nations that a war with Iraq is in order. President Bush as well as Colin Powell have spent days addressing the issue and presenting evidence of the need to forcibly disarm Iraq. As the world watches the events unfold, nations are lining up on one side or the other of the issue. France, Germany and ussia are asking the United States to hold off on an attack and see if a more peaceful solution can be hammered out. Britain, Canada and several others have pledged if a war erupts, they will send troops…… [Read More]

References

Peterson, Karen S.(2001).Peterson, Long deployments stress military families., USA Today, pp 08D.

2001). INDSTRY GROUP 91, AIR FORCE SPOUSE ADDRESSES QUALITY-OF-LIFE ISSUES BEFORE CONGRESS FEDERAL DOCUMENT CLEARING HOUSE, INC.., Regulatory Intelligence Data.

Author not available (2001). U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DAVID HOBSON (R-OH) CHAIRMAN U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DAVID HOBSON (R-OH) HOLDS HEARING ON MILITARY QUALITY OF LIFE., Washington Transcript Service.

____(1999). INDSTRY GROUP 91, DOD STUDIES MISSION, FAMILY NEEDS., Regulatory Intelligence Data.