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George Tinker's Book Missionary Conquest

Words: 1663 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16406499

Missionary Conquest: A critical analysis

It is often said that there is nothing so dangerous as a convert or a missionary. Although many take this idea as a kind of "tongue in cheek" characterization of the excesses of those "blinded by faith," there remains a sinister truth in the statement. George Tinker's book, Missionary Conquest: The Gospel and Native American Cultural Genocide, clearly illustrates the dark side of missionary work, and the damage that can, and has been done to Native American cultures and peoples as a result of the inherent coupling of colonialism/ethnocentrism and religion -- what he calls, "religion in the service of evil." However, although Tinker does a wonderful job in pointing out the unfortunate "Anglo-centrism" of the missionaries he discusses, as well as the horrible price Native Americans would pay as a result of their efforts, he does not acknowledge the difficulty his position as a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Tinker, George. Missionary Conquest. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1993.
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Paul's First Missionary Journey the Conversion of

Words: 3166 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 66999961

Paul's First Missionary Journey

The conversion of Paul from Saul on his way to Damascus marked the beginning of his evangelical work.

Paul and arnabas were believers in the newly established church in Antioch of Syria.

They received the calling from God while in church praying alongside leaders of the church.

Paul was dogmatic, without proper strategy and planning for his missionary journey.

The first missionary journey of Paul

Paul's first missionary journey began at Antioch of Syria

He sailed with arnabas, and john Mark as their helper.

John Mark made his decision and left them as they arrived at Pisidia

Paul travelled through the following places, preaching the Good News and making disciples; the island of Cyprus, Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra and Derbie

Through his missionary work, he received mixed reception, some places acceptance and others wild rejection, to the point of being stoned.

Paul's strategy in his…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Cox, Raymond L. "Journey to Pisidia." Bible and Spade 7:4 (Autumn 1978): 123 -- 28.

2. Culpepper, R. Alan. "Paul's Mission to the Gentile World: Acts 13-19." Review & Expositor 71, no. 4 (Fall 1974): 487 -- 497.

3. Detwiler, David F. "Paul's Approach to the Great Commission in Acts 14:21 -- 23." Bibliotheca Sacra 152:605 (Jan 1995): 34 -- 41.

4. Fleming, Kenneth C. "Missionary Service in the Life of Paul." Emmaus Journal 1:3 (Winter 1992): 263 -- 78.
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Acculturative Stress and Psychological Wellbeing of African Missionary Nuns Working in the USA

Words: 6281 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 41172358

acculturative stress of African Catholic Missionary Nuns (ACMN) serving in the United States. This chapter is divided into five parts. The first part explains the meaning of acculturation and adaptation experiences specific to missionaries. This part emphasizes (1) different perspectives from social and behavioral scientists examining the phenomenon of acculturation (2) different theoretical models describing the stages of acculturation (3) dissimilarities between immigrants and missionary immigrants and what makes the two unique. The second part of this chapter examines the emotional and psychological distress missionaries experience as a result of acculturative stress. The third part focuses on coping strategies and resilience of missionaries. The fourth part introduces the existing literature in the area of acculturative stress of missionaries, emphasizing on limited empirical research in this subject and the necessity for further research in this area of study.

Part One: Background and Overview

Different Social and Behavioral Scientific Perspectives Concerning Acculturation.…… [Read More]

References

Akomolafe, F. (2011, July). The sad tale of African immigrants in Europe. New African, 508, 94-

99.

Andrews, L. (1999). Spiritual, family, and ministry satisfaction among missionaries. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 27(2), 107-118.

Arthur, L.B. (1999). Religion, dress and the body. New York: Berg.
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Living the Word How to Engage in Missionary Work in a Non Imperial Manner

Words: 1726 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94925399

Pastoral Theology: The Modern ole of Mission Work in the Church

Historically, mission work played a critical role in the establishment of the Christian Church. Christians were called to spread Christianity beyond their initial groups of worshippers and the concept of the mission to spread religion gradually developed over time. Over the course of history, these missions have taken varying forms, though mission work has frequently combined the provision of some type of help with introductions to the basic tenets of Christianity. Modern mission work continues to combine these two elements, but in varying ways. Christians are no less called to spread the Gospel than they were in the early days, when Christianity was a new religion and unknown to many of the people of the world. Spreading the Gospel is about more than giving people information about Christianity; for mission workers, spreading the Gospel is about letting people know…… [Read More]

References

Bevans, S & Schroeder, R 2004, Constants in context: a theology of mission for today, Orbis,

Maryknoll.

Bosch, D 1991, Transforming mission: paradigm shifts in theology of mission, Orbis, Maryknoll.

Dorr, D 2000, Mission in today's world, Columba, Dublin.
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Biblical Mission

Words: 2633 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36875123

Christian Church acknowledges its missionary function as truly the core of Christianity, the heart of the Church. Through Christ's teachings, mission is the foreground of His legacy to the Church, the instrument for redemption. The guiding principles at the basis of the Church's mission exist as transparently related by the ible which in itself transcends all worldly knowledge and phenomena. God, as the Holy Trinity, reveals Himself through the biblical record in order to communicate with man candidly and openly, sends His only son into the world in order to claim Him back to the offspring of wholeness, and puts forth a missionary pattern for His followers: "A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another." (John 13:34, 15:17 King James ible) "And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abraham, William, James. The Logic of Evangelism. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1989.

Blauw, Johannes. The Missionary Nature of the Church. New York, Toronto, London: McGraw-Hill Company Inc., 1974.

Bosch, David, C. Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission. New York: Orbis Books, 1991.

Flett, John, G. The Witness of God: The Trinity, Missio Dei, Karl Barth, and the Nature of Christian Community. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2000.
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Jesuit Relations

Words: 1372 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94775781

Jesuit elations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth-Century North America edited by Allan Greer. Specifically it will consider the role the Jesuit missionaries played in the history of New France circa 1633-1665. This book is an important historical document because it preserves many of the practices and parts of the Northeast Native American culture that are now long gone. eading this book is an excellent introduction to Native American culture and values in the early seventeenth-century, and it is valuable for research into the culture, beliefs, and values at the time.

The Jesuits were not in Canada and the Northeast to alter their way of thinking. Their main goals were to colonize and covert the areas to French Christianity. As the editor notes in the Introduction, "And of course, the Jesuits themselves were determined to reshape native thinking and behavior in conformity with Christian principles" (Greer 11). At the time when…… [Read More]

References

Greer, Allan, ed. The Jesuit Relations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth-Century North America. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000.
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Luther Rice and Adoniram Judson

Words: 3429 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3474977

A further development in American Baptism was the evolution of its missionary organization. The rapid growth of missionary zeal, partly as a result of the many accounts by missionaries such as the Judsons, soon resulted in more than one societal ministry supported by the convention.

Meanwhile, Dr. Carey informed Adoniram Judson that he might as well abandon Burma as a missionary destination. He related the experiences of his son William, who had been in the country for four years and was all but ready to give up

. Unable to remain in India any longer, the Judsons then abandoned the Burmese idea in favor of Java or Penang. However, this was not to be. The East India Company continued hounding them to leave the country; the time-sensitive nature of their departure then led the couple to take the only ship available from Madras, which was bound for angoon in Burma.…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Courtney. 1978. To the Golden Shore: The Life of Adoniram Judson. Valley Forge: Judson Press.

Bradshaw, Robert I. 2010. The Life and Work of Adoniram Judson, Missionary to Burma. Theological Studies.  http://www.theologicalstudies.org.uk/article_judson.html 

Christian, John T. 2010. The History of the Baptists, Vol. 2. Providence Baptist Ministries.  http://www.pbministries.org/History/John%20T.%20Christian/vol2/history_of_the_baptist_vol2.htm 

Fritzius, John M. 2005. Luther Rice (1783-1836). Tlogical. http://www.tlogical.net/biorice.htm
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Global Changes in the Missiology

Words: 9755 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77300433

" It caused missionaries to deal with peoples of other cultures and even Christian traditions -- including the Orthodox -- as inferior. God's mission was understood to have depended upon human efforts, and this is why we came to hold unrealistic universalistic assumptions. Christians became so optimistic that they believed to be able to correct all the ills of the world." (Vassiliadis, 2010)

Missiology has been undergoing changes in recent years and after much serious consideration Christians in the ecumenical era "are not only questioning all the above assumptions of the Enlightenment; they have also started developing a more profound theology of mission. One can count the following significant transitions:

(a) From the missio christianorum to the missio ecclesiae;

(b) the recognition later that subject of mission is not even the Church, either as an institution or through its members, but God, thus moving further from the missio ecclesiae to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bosch, David Jacobus (1991) Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission, American Society of Missiology Series; No. 16. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 1991.

Gelder, Craig Van (2007) the Missional Church in Context: Helping Congregations Develop Contextual Ministry. Volume 1 of Missional Church Series. Missional Church Network Series. Wm B. Eerdmans Publishing 2007.

Guder, Darrell L. (2000) the Continuing Conversion of the Church. Grand Rapids, NI: Eerdmans, 2000.

Hesselgrave, David J> (2007) Will We Correct the Edinburgh Error? Future Mission in Historical Perspective. Southwestern Journal of Theology.Vol. 49 No. 2 Spring 2007.
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William Carey and the Grand Commitment

Words: 3216 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 64648488

William Carey -- Father of Modern Missions

William Carey

Britain

Moravians

India

Modern Missions

William Carey, a Baptist preacher, is considered to be the Father of Modern Mission. Carey believed absolutely that the Word of God was to be taken to all nations, devoted his own life to this endeavor, and challenged other believers to engage in this sacred work. In terms of sheer numbers of converts, Carey's accomplishments would be considered small, particularly when measured against the standards in place today. William Carey demonstrated that one man's vision be the catalyst for a movement that will serve God and others in s manner that adheres to the great commission. When Carey first made his ideas about carrying the Word to people around the world, he was told by his ministering peers to sit down and give up the unrealistic and non-mandated idea. But Carey's vision stood fast on the…… [Read More]

References

Author. William Carey: A Baptist Page Portrait," Wholesome Words, Worldwide Missions. 2001 [Webpage]. Retreived www.baptistpage.com

Carpenter, John, (2002) New England Puritans: The grandparents of modern Protestant missions. Fides et Historia, 30(4), 529.

Carey, S. Pearce - William Carey "The Father of Modern Missions," edited by Peter Masters, Wakeman Trust, London. 1993 ISBN 1870855140

Kennedy, D. James. "William Carey: Texts That Have Changed Lives," Truth in Action Ministries. [Video]. Retreived  http://www.truthinaction.org/
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Responsibilities of Christians as Regards

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8724428

"he final third are an estimated 10,000 "people group," or 2.1 billion humans, who for reasons of language or geography have never heard about the Christ of Christmas. And reaching them, missionaries say, involves crossing physical, political, and linguistic barriers." hose barriers will not always be gracious, not always be welcoming, but it goes without saying that devoted Christians do, and will continue, to overcome those barriers to touch the lives of other who have yet to experience the inspiration of the Word of God.

Not a Competition

here is not a competition for souls in Christian missionary work. Missionary work does not use people as human pawns on the chessboard of world politics.

Sometimes, it may be difficult for people, and missionaries alike, to understand that. Christians missionaries serve vital roles in places around the world where each day people lose the battle against the natural forces of nature,…… [Read More]

The Sphere Project represents a far more recent attempt at codification. It was established on July 1, 1997 by the Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response (SCHR) and Interaction, with the aim of examining and setting the minimum standards of behavior for those involved in humanitarian responses. The project has involved front line NGOs and the Red Cross and the Red Crescent Movement, interested donor governments, and UN agencies cooperating to develop a set of standards in core areas of human relief."

More Quiet Missionary

There are those who have alleged that the Anglican Church has forgotten its missionary responsibility In fact,
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The Meaning of Mission in the Bible

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29827101

PASTORAL THEOLOGY (MISSION): A Review and Assessment of Book Chapters on Mission

The key ideas in these chapters are that the idea of mission is rooted in the Bible and in the actions of the early Church, as the missionaries spread throughout the world taking with them the ord of God and giving it to those individuals and groups of people/communities who embraced it and wanted to live their lives according to this ord. The ord was the Mission Statement, so to speak, of the early Church, and the Bible makes this very clear. From the beginning, God's chosen had an affinity with the non-chosen, that is, the Gentiles, of whom Our Lord counted Himself as one. Thus, the perspective of the early missionaries was this: they were not going out to preach to people they did not know but rather to people who were indeed their brothers in sisters…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bosch, David J. Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission.

Maryknoll NY: Orbis, 1991. Print.

Senior, Donald & Carroll Stuhlmueller. The Biblical Foundations for Mission.

London: SCM, 1983. Print.
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Paul's Early Life Birth Upbringing and Early

Words: 1854 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94746152

Paul's Early Life (birth, Upbringing, And Early Education)

Paul's early life can be dated back from 1-33 A.D. His upbringing comprised of being born in Tarsus of Cilicia, where he was raised under another name, Saul. He was raised in a Jewish, strict household. Because Paul was Jewish, he received abbinic training in Jerusalem from abbi Gamaliel. As he received his training, he also learned the traditions of the Pharisees. Later on in this period, Paul worked with the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem as well as adopting the Sanhedrin policies. The Sanhedrin were in opposition of the church and so was Paul. Including Jewish culture, Paul received immersion into Hellenistic culture of the era, which meant he went to the gymnasium, attended Greek dramas at the Amphitheatre, and was knowledge on the various schools of Greek Philosophy. Gamaliel taught Paul the Scriptures including the traditional lessons of the Pharisees. This meant…… [Read More]

References

GCU Media,. (2014). Paul Timeline. Retrieved 16 December 2014, from  http://lc.gcumedia.com/bib380/documents/paul-timeline-map-v1.1.pdf 

Greg, P. (2014). Paul through Mediterranean eyes: cultural studies in 1 Corinthians. International Bulletin of Missionary Research, 38(3), 163-164.

Parable,. (2014). Life Application Study Bible. Retrieved 15 December 2014, from http://cdn-parable.com/content/preview/9780310434481.pdf

Polhill, J. (1999). Paul and his letters. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman.
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Jesuits and Hurons in New

Words: 1257 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61502495

rebeuf writes at length concerning the Huron thoughts about their origins, superstitions, belief in dreams, feasts, dances, sorcerers, style of government, council procedures, and burial ceremonies. He devotes the final chapter to the Huron Feast of the Dead.

III. In DEFENSE of LE JEUNE

The work of Charles Principe (1990) entitled "A Moral Portrait of the Indian of the St. Lawrence in One Relation of New France, Written by Paul Le Jeune' states a response to what is viewed as a revisionist history that criticizes Le Jeune unfairly for his "depictions of the Montagnais in the Jesuit Relations." (Principe, 1990) the argument of Principe is that even while scholars contend that Le Jeune was particularly harsh in criticizing the tribe that there was actually great admiration of the tribe on the part of Le Jeune and that he viewed them has having the potential to develop into 'very noble Christians'.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Campeau, L. (ed) Huron Relations for 1635 and 1636 Jean de Brebeuf, S.J., edited by Lucien Campeau, S.J. (Transl. William Lonc, S.J.)

Hannan, a.A. (1944-5) a Chapter in the History of Huronia at Ossossane in 1637. CCHA Report, 11 (1944-45), 31-42  http://www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/ccha/Back%20Issues/CCHA1944-45/Hannan.html 

Principe, Charles. (1990) "A Moral Portrait of the Indian of the St. Lawrence in One Relation of New France, Written by Paul Le Jeune, S.J." Canadian Catholic Historical Association, Historical Studies 57 (1990): 29-50.

The Jesuits and the Iroquois | Cornelius Michael Buckley, S.J. | Foreword to Jesuit Missionaries to North America: Spiritual Writings and Biographical Sketches by Francois Roustang, S.J.
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Redemptive Role of the Black

Words: 2354 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 72409999

44). She affiliated with the African Methodist Church (AME), preaching from New York State to Ohio and down South as well. She published her autobiography in 1849 and received "strong resistance and biting criticism," according to Frances Smith Foster (1993). "Lee used her alleged inferiority to emphasize the power of her message and in so doing, she…implies an authority superior to those whom she addresses" (Foster, p. 57). Indeed, Lee used the New Testament assertion that "the last shall be first" and in her autobiography she said she was an example of God's "ability to use even 'a poor coloured female instrument' to convert sinners…" (Foster, p. 57).

Another worthy source utilized for this paper is Dr. Edward R. Crowther, Professor of History at Adams State College in Colorado. Crowther published an article in the Journal of Negro History explaining how African-Americans got away from the white man's church after…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blount, Brian K. (2005). Can I Get a Witness? Reading Revelation Through African-American

Culture. Louisville, Kentucky: Westminster John Knox Press.

Clayton, Obie. (1995). The Churches and Social Change: Accommodation, Moderation, or Protest. Daedalus, 124(1), 101-119).

Collier-Thomas, Bettye. (1998). Daughters of Thunder: Black Women Preachers and Their
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Okonkwo Cannot Deal With Conflict

Words: 389 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58662066

All of these are examples of the more dangerous and insidious effects of subtle, hidden persuasion. Yes, the Brown approach is to merely offer his product, but the product has many hidden side effects, such as the need to give up one's native gods. These effects are not immediately obvious to the unwitting consumer. At least Smith is honest about the lack of respect shown by Christian society to native faiths.

This poses a question of my own: are missionaries ever ethical, if they require a society to give up its native gods? Is missionary behavior unethical only when it is used as a tool of colonialism? Should persuasive advertising or missionary behavior in a free market or free society always be…… [Read More]

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Biblical Worldview Church

Words: 1327 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9871396

Church

The Bible implores young people to be leaders in their spiritual communities, for youth can be the pallbearers of faith. "Don't let anyone look down on you because you are young, but set an example for the believers in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith and in purity," (1 Timothy 4:12). For a church to remain relevant for today's youth, it must actively communicate with young people using the symbols, language, and activities that the current generation appreciates and understands. The challenge is to retain core church values while still packaging traditional Biblical truths in new ways. In other words, churches need to be careful not to sacrifice core values, but to always help young people see how faith and service are important parts of spiritual growth, social functioning, and overall health and happiness.

The church I currently attend does a good job of keeping young people active…… [Read More]

References

Huizenga, D. (n.d.). Is church relevant? Ignite Your Faith. Retrieved online:  http://www.christianitytoday.com/iyf/faithandlife/mylifeinyouthgroup/25.18.html 

Taylor, J. (n.d.). Top ten reasons the church is losing our youth. Justin Taylor: Between Two Worlds. Retrieved online:  http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2013/02/11/top-10-reasons-the-church-is-losing-our-youth/ 

"Why Young Adults are Leaving the Church." Relevant Magazine. Retrieved online:  http://www.relevantmagazine.com/god/church/features/27595-why-young-adults-are-leaving-the-church
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Things Fall Apart in the

Words: 350 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32439446

Okonkwo seems full of passionate intensity to preserve things as they are, and to preserve his sense of masculine, patriarchal authority. But although this sense of passion seems to have its origin sense of nostalgia for traditional forms of control, it is also too tied up the man's ego to be called a conviction. A true conviction about justice is not self-interested. It is also worth remembering that Okonkwo's father did not embody such authority within his own family structure, thus Okonkwo partly wishes to defy his own family's tradition. And Okonkwo's sense of wishing to preserve the positive aspects of his personal authority does not mean that he is not willing to kill his adopted son, for fear of looking weak, even though this hurts the tribe's future. Thus Okonkwo lacks convictions that transcend the self, and denies such positive self-sacrificing values as feminine.… [Read More]

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Cultural Perceptions of Time in Africa Time

Words: 6951 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52859355

Cultural Perceptions of Time in frica

Time is a foundational factor in every culture. The perception of time is different for most cultures and the determining factor to those differences is often based on the means of production. "Most cultures have some concept of time, although the way they deal with time may differ fundamentally." (Kokole 1994, 35) Tracing the perception of the concept of time in frica can be seen as tracing the European racial prejudices of the intellect of the indigenous populations in the colonized regions of frica. Much of the information regarding the development of time concepts in frican culture is colonial and based on the European interlopers recorded ideas.

Some of those recorded ideas are those of missionaries and others are those of capitalist adventurers, with the intermittent mark of a very few true historians.

In Mali, as in many other parts of frica, there are…… [Read More]

Akan" is an ethnographic and linguistic term used to refer to a cluster of culturally homogenous groups living in central and southern Ghana and parts of the adjoining eastern Cote d'Ivoire. The Akan constitute two broad subcategories: the inland Asante, Bono, Akyem, Akwapem, and Kwawu, who speak the Twi, and the coastal Fante, who speak a dialect of the same name. The Akan dialects are, for the most part, mutually intelligible. Most of these ethnic groups constituted autonomous political systems in the pre-colonial period. www.questia.com/PageManagerHTMLMediator.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=55458430" (Adjaye 1994, 57)

Studies of Akan time perceptions and calendrical systems have been limited despite the fact that the existence of institutions and mechanisms for time-reckoning have been noted in the literature on the history and ethnography of the Akan for nearly two centuries. Beyond early sparse references by Rattray (1923) and Danquah (1968), a full-length monograph on the subject did not appear until Deborah Fink "Time and Space Measurements of the Bono of Ghana" (1974); however, the author's primary concern was with the applicability of Bono terminologies for measuring volume, weight, and time to formal education, rather than with time-marking systems P.F. Bartle brief five-page paper, "Forty Days: The Akan Calendar" (1978), was an exploratory essay into a single calendrical framework, the 40-day (adaduanan) cycle. Its treatment is consequently restrictive and limited to the 40-day calendrical structure. Similarly, Tom McCaskie "Time and the Calendar in Nineteenth-Century Asante: An Exploratory Essay" (1980) and Ivor Wilks ' "On Mentally Mapping Greater Asante: A Study of Time and Motion" (1992) are concerned primarily with a specific aspect of time: the scheduling of diplomatic and other governmental business in Asante.

(Adjaye 1994, 57)
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1500 History of World Societies

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 40673914

The British created a well-educated, English-speaking Indian elite middle class d. new jobs were created for millions of Indian hand-spinner and hand-weavers

The Indian National Congress can best be described in which of the following ways:

Answer:

a. An Indian Civil Service that administered British rule.

b. A group of upper-caste professionals seeking independence from Britain.

c. white settlers who administered British rule.

d. anglicized Indians who were the social equals of white rulers.

Under the Culture System, Indonesian peasants had to Answer:

a. learn to speak and read Dutch b. plant one-fifth of their land in export crops to be turned over to the Dutch colonial government c. convert to the Dutch Reformed Church d. join large state-run farms.

Modern Vietnamese nationalism traced much of its inspiration to Answer:

a. Japanese modernization.

b. China's "Hundred Days" Reform program.

c. The U.S. Declaration of Independence.

d. British Fabian socialism.

The…… [Read More]

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Religion Theology Reaching Out to Communities

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 60707210

Religion / Theology

Reaching out to communities and cultures that have not embraced Christianity is what God wants Christians to do. On this page references that describe the people and history of the country of Tunisian -- with its Arab community described and evaluated in terms of political and cultural history -- will be presented as a preface to a plan on page 2. Thesis: Scripture calls for all Christian believers to "Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation" (Mark 16:15); hence it is our duty to take the ord of Christ to Tunisia, bringing Saving Grace to Tunisia.

Bilgin, Feridun. 2012. The Ottoman-Spanis Struggle for Sovereignty Over Tunisia (16th

Century). Electronic Journal of Social Sciences. 12 (inter): 181-201.

Bishku, Michael B. 2013. "Is It An Arab Spring or Business as Usual? Recent Changes in the Arab orld in Historical Context." Journal of Third orld…… [Read More]

Women's rights have been part of the basis for the Arab uprisings against authority, and although the Holy Bible (in particular the Old Testament) makes women second-class citizens, and issues decrees against women teaching or speaking in church, in Tunisia (Megahed, et al., 2011) an upgrading of the status of women is part of the agenda for change, and modern Christians fully accept and promote the concept of gender-educational equality (Megahed, 57). To wit, women in Tunisia reportedly have "the highest rate of female literary… in the Arab world" (Maddy-Weitzman, 2011).

Maddy-Weitzman also points out that the multitude of demonstrators in Tunisia in 2011 demanded the separation of "mosque and state"; in other words, the government should not be imposing religious laws on people.

To date there are approximately 1,500 Christians in Tunisia and according to a post on Faithlafayette.org, Christians will appear on Tunisian television; we pray there will not be any persecution of those bringing missionary messages to Tunisians. There is historical evidence of a Muslim prince, Ibn al-Lihyani, who "…seized control of Tunis in a bloodless coup in 1311" and later he converted to Christianity; this precedent opens the door for missionaries (Lower, 2009).
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Working Through R Paul Stevens' Book a

Words: 1694 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18181571

working through R. Paul Stevens' book, a reader is struck by how different this approach is to the ministry and the laity. In fact some of the ideas and passages are radically different from what one might expect in a book like this. The fact that Stevens places such enormous emphasis on laity is in fact refreshing to the reader; maybe it is special to me because my father was a minister and put tremendous faith in the lay "pastors" in our church. Those laypersons carried out many functions in the church that otherwise fall into the responsible hands of my father. But, in the bigger picture, all believers can be ministering to the world about the good news of Christianity. This is the overriding point in Stevens' work. It shouldn't be left up to the clergy alone to minister to the congregation and the community; in fact laypeople are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Stevens, R. Paul. 2000. The Other Six Days: Vocation, Work, and Ministry in Biblical

Perspectives. Cubao, Philippines: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing.
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Grew Up in an Underdeveloped Urban City

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4531486

grew up in an underdeveloped urban city where the poverty and social conditions hindered me from getting an appropriate education.

Like Rafe Esquith, I believe that this has given me a special empathy to people from societies similar to mine. I understand them. Take just a few days ago, for instance. I was stopped by robbers at gunpoint who forced me to continue to drive. Many others, I suppose, would have been afraid. I can't say I wasn't, but more than that. I was them. I was with them. I understood why they were doing this. I pitied for their childhood, and I wished to help them.

TEP's two-year graduate program offers specialized urban teacher preparation in the form of a two-year intensive Master of Education (M.Ed.) program in teaching for social justice in urban communities. Yes! This calls to me. But far more resonant with me is your objective:…… [Read More]

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Ocean Brought Me to California

Words: 443 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51822796

Her faith is something that she holds dear to her heart, as I do. Faith is something that holds people together through the good times and the bad, so it is something I consider to be very important in a mate. I was raised in a Christian family and my faith is important to me. I like to spend a lot of time with my family and my close friends, and of course that special someone. She has a kind and generous soul, emotionally supportive of my constant efforts to better myself.

Conversation is important. I am a listener, so it is always good to have a bit of a talker around, somebody who can help me break out of my shell. I can be a bit of a techie egghead sometimes, so my perfect mate is someone who pushes me to be more sociable than I usually am, not…… [Read More]

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Quality of Rice's Academic Life

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44886636

Even in my current extracurricular activities, such as on my Varsity football team, sacrificing my need to be a 'star' and instead serve the common good is a necessity. Teaching the novice debaters is an integral part of my duties on my school's Lincoln-Douglas Debate team. I must help them see the world from competing perspectives, and to see issues in terms of grey, rather than stark black and white.

I am so thankful for the people in my life who have taught me this spirit of community: the people I met over the summer in Texas taught me what it means to be a good neighbor, the children and senior citizens I have befriended who have shown me that friendship knows no age or socioeconomic status. I have, despite the shortness of my life, tried to craft an open soul with few fences, with no barbed wire around my…… [Read More]

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Hardship Letter Any Business Relationship

Words: 1790 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 77963534



4. I did not obtain my current mortgage under any materially false pretenses.

As part of the Hope for Homeowners program, I would be able to attain a new affordable mortgage based on a current appraisal value. I would retain 10% equity in the property, and would be sharing the equity and future appreciation with the Federal government, which would prohibit me from taking out any additional loans against the property except for direct repairs and/or maintenance. There are also up front insurance premiums for this type of loan, which I am aware of.

If you would please consider one of these two options, I believe we can come up with a mutually satisfying solution to help avoid foreclosure on my home. I am writing this hardship letter to plead with your company to review my loan information, take into account my current financial situation, my excellent payment history prior…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Mortgage Bankers Association. Fannie Mae Posts Conventional Mortgage Servicing Modifications (06-18). Related Documents, 2008 Mortgage Bankers Association. Website with .pdf file:

 http://fha-refinance-program.com/hope-for-homeowners.html 

 http://www.hud.gov/fha/home080730.cfm   http://portal.hud.gov/portal/page?_pageid=73,7601299&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
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Makea Change Through Business A

Words: 5675 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 66051546

In the first one to three years, Make a Change plans to step up its budget or marketing and advertising expenses as a way to drive up business and profits. After the first year, we also plan to bring in other charities on board to share in some of the donations we will be producing through our gross profits.

Production Goals

T-Shirts

The main cornerstone of the business will rely upon t-shirt sales. On our site, we will offer a variety of different colors and styles, which vary in price to the customer. These shirts range in cost to us depending on the style chosen. Like all other products, 10% of our gross profits from t-shirt sales will go to our chosen charity. All tees are 100% cotton, with several sizes, fits, and colors available to the consumer.

Make a Change Brand. Blank cotton tees total to $1.75 a piece,…… [Read More]

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Men of Life in a California Mission by Jean-Francois De La Perouse

Words: 567 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79067985

Jean Francoise De La Perouse

'Life in a California Mission" by Francois de Laperouse

In the document "Life in a California Mission," navigator and explorer Jean Francois de Laperouse provided a European's insight into the lives of Native Americans during the 18th century. This period marked the influx of explorations in various regions and continents of the world by European explorers/colonizers. Known as the "Age of Discovery," 18th century was a period of discovering the unknown cultures, societies, and peoples that dominate the unexplored territories of the world. In "Life," Laperouse provided an account of his observations and judgment about the Native Americans, as his party set out to create a new colony in the northern territory which would be known as the "New World."

Laperouse's narrative offered an interesting viewpoint about the lives of the Natives of the Americas. Far from depicting the Natives as savages and devoid of…… [Read More]

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William Carey Biography at One

Words: 4876 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47421959

"

Although Carey's journal reportedly ends prematurely, he continued to write letters for the next thirty years.

Carey understood the value in/of education, medicine, and other works. He continually encouraged missionaries to travel to the hinterland "and build an indigenous Christianity with vernacular Bibles and other writings and native-led churches."

For his mission to succeed, hile it simultaneously retained its core, Carey purported, it had to not only fill the eternal needs of people missionaries shared the gospel with, but also their day-to-day needs.

During his day-to-day life, Carey was also a husband and father. The following relates details regarding his three marriages.

Dorothy Plackett Carey (1755?-1807): Married illiam Carey in 1781. She was 25 and he was 19. Their marriage was a contrast in ability and interests. She was reluctant to leave England and go to India. Only after much perusasion and on the condition that her sister, Kitty,…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104231781

Balmer, Randall. Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2004. Book online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104231922.Internet . Accessed 27 March 2008.

Barnhill, John H.. "The Journal and Selected Letters of William Carey.(Book Review)," Baptist History and Heritage, January 1, 2001. Available from Highbeam Research,  http://www.highbeam.com .Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.

Carey, Eustace. Memoir of William Carey, D.D.: Late Missionary to Bengal.(Jackson and Walford, 1836; Digitized Oct 24, 2006. Available from,  http://books.google.com/books?id=_73iSb36t9IC&vq=William+Carey,+missionary&source=gbs_summary_s&cad=0.Internet . Accessed 27 March 2008.

An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the by William Carey. Produced by Michael Ciesielski, Robert Shimmin and PG Distributed Proofreaders, N.d. Available from, http://www.fullbooks.com/an-Enquiry-into-the-Obligations-of-Christians.html. Internet. Accessed 27 March 2008.
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Taiping Rebellion vs Boxer Rebellion

Words: 7651 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44034377

Taiping ebellion vs. Boxer ebellion

The last two centuries are considered as the golden age of millenarianism in the sense that they brought about a change in the existing system, by means of overthrow of the system which existed. And the new system which evolved was considered as better than the old system which existed and was brought about by overthrowing the powerful. The reason is simple. As the sociologists and historians of the millenarianism say, one does not become sensitive to such ideas simply being oppressed or miserable. But instead, these ideas develop from those of whose expected and traditional lives have been destroyed and disrupted, uprooted and rendered rootless, even if they were having an unpromising and unpleasant life earlier.

As a result of the industrial revolution, many such people came to North America and Europe, but the nations which Europe was trying to bring under its control…… [Read More]

References

Boardman, E. Christian Influence upon the ideology of the Taiping Rebellion, 1851-1864. Madison, University of Wisconsin Press, (1952). pp. 52-81

Chesneaux, Jean; Marianne, Bastid; and Bergere, Marie Claire. "China: From the Opium Wars to the 1911 Revolution" Pantheon Books, (1976) pp. 44-51

Ch'en, Jerome 'The nature and characteristics of the Boxer movement: a morphological study', Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies vol. 23, (1960) p.20-26

Ch'en, Jerome 'The Origin of the Boxers', in Jerome Ch'en and Nicholas Tarling (eds.), Studies in the Social History of China and South East Asia Cambridge, (1970) pp.45-57
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1904 Revival Beginning in Wales

Words: 2237 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 84149149



Analysis

The Baby Boomer Revival assumed shapes and forms different than the former ones with programs Charismatic movement, the East Timor Indonesian Revivals, the 'Jesus People', the Asbury College Revival; and the Saskatoon Revival representing the spirits of the times in order to woo people to the mission movement and get them interested in the Church. At oen time, the church would have prohibited these charismatic programs and many, indeed, were controversial when they first appeared and still are today. Nonetheless, their impression and effects have been enduring and in a time when traditional programs were falling flat with the church losing members per day, innovative programs were the only ones that succeeded.

What I have learned

Sometimes, dramatic changes -- a shift in perspective and a change of habits -- are necessary for end-goals and objective to be reached.

The Pre-Reformation Revival, 1300-1500

Summary

Corruption of the church lowered…… [Read More]

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Women S Role in Boniface Mission

Words: 3123 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84342057

Saint Boniface's birth to be 675 AD. Born as either ynfriyh, infrid, or ynfrith in the kingdom of essex in what is known as Anglo-Saxon England, Boniface became a leading figure during the 8th century in the Anglo-Saxon mission that led to mass conversion in the German areas of Frankish Territory. Regarded as the first archbishop of Mainz and the patron saint of Germania, he was able to establish the first organized Christianity throughout Germania. Killed in 754 in Frisia, his remains were sent back to Fulda where they quickly became a location of pilgrimage. Since he is a well-known saint, much of his life and death, including his work is widely available. His letters provide not only access to his thoughts and events in his life, but also the thoughts and events of others, in particular women.

Being an apostle of Germania, Saint Boniface assisted in shaping estern Christianity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boniface, and Ephraim Emerton. The Letters of Saint Boniface. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. Print.

Damico, Helen and Alexandra Hennessey Olsen. New Readings On Women in Old English Literature. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. Print.

Fletcher, R. A. The Barbarian Conversion. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. Print.

Rowe, Mary Ellen. "Leoba's Purple Thread: The Women of the Boniface Mission." Magistra 17.2 (2011): 1-7. Print.
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Myths Missions and Mistrust The

Words: 1189 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 68519472

There was so much instability in Japan at this time, according to Nelson, that it was not difficult for the Christians to simply move around and find places (like in Nobunaga's realm) where they could spread the word of Christianity. "Japan…is always revolving like a wheel; for he who today is a great lord, may be a penniless nobody tomorrow" (Boxer 1951: 74; Nelson 98). Nelson (99) points out that Nobunaga like the anti-Buddhist attitude of the missionaries; however, he also notes that the historian George Sansom argued that Nobunaga did not hate Buddhism, he simply did not like the way that it managed to interfere in political matters. Some Buddhists sects came to be wary of Christians because of Nobunaga's liking for them; it was the fact that Nobunaga thought that the Christians knew their place and the Buddhist monks did not that was the main difference for Nobunaga's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nelson, John. "Myths, Missions, and Mistrust: The Fate of Christianity in 16th and 17th

Century Japan." History and Anthropology. Volume 13 (2), pp. 93-111, 2002.
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How Confucianism Impacted China

Words: 4732 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28788747

Confucianism in Pre-Modern China

Confucianism comes from the Chinese philosopher Confucius, after whom the philosophy takes its name. Confucius lived from the middle of the 6th century BC to the first part of the 5th century BC and was a teacher of the values of those who lived in the days of Chinese antiquity. For Confucius, the greatest years of the Zhou dynasty had come in the three centuries prior to his birth. The dynasty itself lasted for centuries following Confucius' life, though in a much different form from what came before. Confucius viewed the lessons of the early Zhou dynasty as containing valuable nuggets of wisdom. Confucius' teachings carried on well after his day as did many other schools of thought in China, where philosophy and wisdom were highly prized and sought after by many Chinese leaders from Confucius' own time till the end of the 3rd century BC.…… [Read More]

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Myths Missions and Mistrust The

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73570825

The Jesuits also were targeting the elite class as opposed to the Franciscans working with the poorer classes. The problem was that the ruling people, because of the drama and tension between Christian sects, saw Christianity as a threat to their own power.

In the book The Japanese and the Jesuits: Alessandro Valignano in Sixteenth Century Japan, Moran and Moran (1992: iii) that in promoting Christianity, the Jesuits -- one of them being Valignano, a prominent figure among the Jesuits in Asias -- looked to the ruling class for support of their religion. Valignano was a different type of missionary as he impressed the importance of learning Japanese upon the missionaries. However, after Valignano's death, Christianity was proscribed and missionaries were banished from Japan (iii). hat was interesting about Valignano is that he understood that foreign missionaries were not capable of converting the Japanese to Christianity, and one of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Elison, George. Deus Destroyed: The Image of Christianity in Early Modern Japan.

Moran, J.F. & Moran, J.F. The Japanese and the Jesuits: Alessandro Valignano in Sixteenth Century Japan. Routledge; 1st edition, 1992.

Nelson, John. "Myths, Missions, and Mistrust: The Fate of Christianity in 16th and 17th

Century Japan." History and Anthropology,13(2), pp. 93-111. Routledge, 2002.
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Mission Trade A Primary Goal

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45562122



Silence, Endo uses the background of persecution to contemplate these knotty questions. ("Silence")

Endo seeks to show within Silence, then, how the missionaries themselves misunderstood which aspects of Christianity to emphasize to Japanese would-be converts, just as he himself had misunderstood the universal appeal that Christianity could potentially have in areas outside the western world, including Japan, until he had visited Palestine. As a missionary religion, as Endo also implies, Christianity must rely on persuasive power in order to truly capture the hearts and minds of people anywhere that it seeks to convert. Japanese feudalism and European trade, on the other hand, rely only on force, coercion, and violence - no match for Christian missionaries in an area like Japan, especially if those missionaries' Christianity is not accepted in Japan in the first place. Religious zeal, then, in order to have any real hope of vanquishing competing economic forces, must…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Endo, Shusaku. Silence. London: Taplinger, 1980.

Joffe, Rolfe (Dir.). The Mission.

With Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons.

United Kingdom. 1986.
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Emergence of Colonial Resistance in Things Fall Apart

Words: 3014 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5253239

Things Fall Apart

Chinua Achebe is one of the most influential and powerful writers of today, and he is also one of the most widely published writers today. Chinua Achebe has in fact written more than twenty-one novels, and short stories, and books of poetry as well, and his very first landmark work was "Things Fall apart," which was published in the year 1958, when the author was just twenty-eight years old. This work has proved to be popular not only in Nigeria, but also in the whole of Africa, as well as in the rest of the world. Chinua Achebe was born in the year 1930 in Nigeria, as the son of a Christian Churchman and his wife. He attended the Government College in Umuahia, and then went on to University College in Ibadan, after which he went on to the London University, where he received his BA. Chinua…… [Read More]

References

Chinua Achebe. New York State Writer's Institute. Retrieved From

 http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst/achebe.html  Accessed 10 August, 2005

Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart, Study guide. Retrieved From

http://www.wsu.edu:8000/~brians/anglophone/achebe.html
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Religion of Australian Aborigines a

Words: 1910 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65077696

Many claim Islam increases their sense of worth. Islam particularly appeals to disaffected young men. Solomon, 23-years-old, participated in a television interview. "It's not a part of our religion to stand there and get stepped on," Solomon said. "That's why Islam is so good for the Aboriginal people." (Australian Aborigines...)

Europeans prefer the name "Koori" for Aborigine, even though they named the native Australians "Aborigine." Aborigine, however, means "from the beginning." Aborigines "taught their children dances, songs, and stories for both sacred and non-sacred rituals that taught them traditions and history of the past, present and future." (Australian Aborigines...) Along with plants, animals, other natural objects, man categorized himself with his totem. Aborigines focused on and blamed the supernatural for every scenario. Some individuals believed a victim of a spell would usually sicken and die, because they believed it would happen. At one time in the Aborigines' religion, the "medicine…… [Read More]

References

AIPR Fact sheet: Psychic and Mystical Experiences of the Aborigines. (2002). 07 December 2006. http://www.aiprinc.org/aborig.asp.

Australian Aborigines Dreamers. (2002). 7 December 2006. http://www.religionportal.com/ReligionFinder/religions/australiaaborigines.htm.

Australian Aboriginal Religion." (2006). 7 December 2006. http://philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/westoc/abor.html.

OZ CITY AUSTRALIA - Australian Aborigines. (2001). 07 December 2006.  http://ozcity.faithweb.com/aborigines.html .
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Culture and Universal Principles in Things Fall Apart

Words: 2111 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49314502

Things Fall Apart and the Issue of Culture

From a cultural analysis perspective, the two main cultures represented in Achebe's Things Fall Apart, stem from opposing religious/social positions and both react to and against one another in different ways, as illustrated by the actions of the main character Okonkwo, a native Igbo and leader of his community (violently committed to defending his tribe's ways and culture against other tribes and against the incoming foreign invasion of the Christian missionaries and British soldiers), and by Nwoye, Okonkwo's son who rejects the culture and beliefs of the Ibo tribe and converts to Christianity. The split between father and son represents the split at the heart of the novel between two cultures and two worldviews; neither is without its flaws and both speak to different matters of the heart and head. However, the irreconcilable differences that arise between the meeting of the two…… [Read More]

References

Achebe, C. (1996). Things Fall Apart, Expanded Edition. UK: Heinemann.

Caldwell, R. (2005). Things fall apart? Discourses on agency and change in organizations. Human Relations, 58(1): 83-114.

Gilbert, A. (1989). Things Fall Apart? Psychological theory in the context of rapid social change. South African Journal of Psychology, 19(2): 91-100.

Langford, T. (1999). Things fall apart: State failure and the politics of intervention.
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Extinction of the Native American Indians

Words: 4659 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25418348

Extinction of the Native American

The area of the world that is now known as the United States of America used to belong to various tribes of people which are now known as Native Americans as opposed to their old name, Indians, which was a misnomer based on the erroneous idea that explorers from Europe did not know that such a large land mass existed and that by crossing the Atlantic Ocean, they had made it to the country of India. hen Europeans first arrived in this country, they were highly outnumbered by populations of Native Americans. The United States of America is a nation that was built on the ideas of life, liberty, pursuit of happiness, and freedom for all persons. Yet, that freedom has been won only through the genocide of hundreds of thousands of people. In the course of a few centuries, the Native American peoples have…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Alexis de Tocqueville. Tocqueville and Beaumont on Race. 1831.

Benjamin Franklin. Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America. The Norton Anthology

of American Literature. 1782.

Bruce Johnson. Encyclopedia of American Indian History. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2008.
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Black Church the Redemptive Role

Words: 16899 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 2523902

It will use historical evidence to examine the role of the church is a spiritual entity. It will examine the role of the church as a political entity throughout changing political landscapes. It will explore the role of the church as a social service provider with regards to the importance of this role in helping black people to redeem themselves in light of historical cultural atrocities that they have faced.

esearch Questions

In order to examine that topics of interest un this research study the following research questions be addressed.

1. How has the black church served as redemptive force in helping the black people to heal?

2. What factors served as a redemptive force in helping the image of black people in the black church to improve?

3. How has a black church helped black communities to regain and maintain their self-sufficiency?

4. How has the black church served…… [Read More]

References

Primary Sources

Aaron. (1845), the Light and Truth of Slavery. Aaron's History: Electronic Edition. Retrieved June 19, 2010 from  http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/aaron/aaron.html#p6 

Adams, John Quincy. (1872). Narrative of the Life of John Quincy Adams. Retrieved June 19,

2010 from  http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/adams/adams.html#adams6
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Spirit Strategies for Informed Decisions

Words: 4152 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 73577540

God's taking sides can be pushed to saying that the rich cannot be saved, or that God does not love everyone.

The Holy Spirit and iberation Theology

As Boff and Boff ( 1987) state: "Every true theology springs from a spirituality -- that is, from a true meeting with God in history. iberation theology was born when faith confronted the injustice done to the poor."

In this sense the Spirit is essentially perceived in terms of the interconnection between humanity and God. Put less blatantly, the Holy Spirit is the conduit of the absolute or divine to the domain of human existential experience. This view of the Spirit resonates with the focus on experiential suffering in the world. In other words, the Holy Spirit is not abstract but is rather perceived as a spiritual source of intervention in the world, which coincides with the focus of liberation theology.

The issue…… [Read More]

Leonardo Boff, and Clodovis Boff, Introducing Liberation Theology /, trans. Paul Burns [book online] (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1987, accessed 4 May 2012), 91; available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102085764 ; Internet.

Leonardo Boff, and Clodovis Boff, Introducing Liberation Theology /, trans. Paul Burns [book online] (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1987, accessed 4 May 2012), 91; available from Questia,
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Colonial Resistance in Thing Fall Apart

Words: 2585 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74564629

Colonial Resistance in Things Fall Apart

Chinua Achebe was born in Ogidi, Nigeria, and his father was a teacher in a missionary school. His parents were devout evangelical Protestants and christened him Albert after Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, although they installed in him many of the values of their traditional Igbo culture. He attended University College in Ibadan, where he studied English, history and theology. At the university Achebe rejected his ritish name and took his indigenous name Chinua. In 1953 he graduated with a A, and later studied broadcasting at the C where, in 1961, he became the first Director of External roadcasting at the Nigerian roadcasting Corporation. In 1944 Achebe attended Government College in Umuahia. He was also educated at the University College of Ibadan, like other major Nigerian writers including John Okigbo, Wole Soyinka, John Pepper Clark, Elechi Amadi, and Cole Omotso. There he studied…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1958.

Balint-Kurti, Daniel. "Novelist rejects national honors to protest conditions in Nigeria." Chicago Sun-Times. 18 October 2004. 4 August 2005 .

Bowen, Roger. "Speaking Truth to Power: An Interview with Chinua Achebe." Academe. Jan/Feb 2005. 4 August 2005 .

Gallagher, Susan VanZanten. "Linguistic power: encounter with Chinua Achebe - Nigerian writer." Christian Century. 12 March 1997. 4 August 2005 .
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Bartolom De Las Casas Human Rights Activist

Words: 4008 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 99474498

Bartoleme De Las Casas

An Analysis of the Activism of Bartoleme De Las Casas

Often characterized by modern historians as the "Defender and the apostle to the Indians," Bartolome de Las Casas is known for exposing and condemning as well as exaggerating and misrepresenting the violent practices of Spanish colonizers of the New orld against Native Americans. Marked by emotional polemic and often embellished statistics, Las Casas' voluminous works brought him both support and opposition in his own time. hile being harshly criticized as a threat to Spanish rule in America, De Las Casas was also continually financially supported by the Crown and offered high offices by the Church (Benzoni 48). Though more than four hundred years have passed since his death, the works of this controversial Dominican friar continue to elicit strong reactions from both detractors and defenders -- from both those who condemn him and those who praise…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adorno, Rolena. "Discourses on Colonialism: Bernal Diaz, Las Casas, and the Twentieth-Century Reader." MLN, vol. 103, no. 2 (Mar., 1988), pp. 239-258. Print.

Alker, Hayward. "The Humanistic Moment in International Studies: Reflections on Machiavelli and Las Casas." International Studies Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 4 (Dec., 1992), pp. 347-371. Print.

Bandelier, Adolph Francis. "Bartoleme de las Casas." The Catholic Encyclopedia, vol.

3. NY: Robert Appleton Company, 1908. Print.
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Christianity and Paganism in Beowulf

Words: 3869 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73150546

Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxons
Part 1: Introduction
Although the epic Old English poem Beowulf has all the characteristics of myth and legend that pertain to fiction, as a historical document it is useful in teaching about the past—the values and culture of the medieval Anglo-Saxon society and how Christian culture intersected with the pagan world at a time when Christian conversion was spreading. Not only does Beowulf refer to real kings of the time, thus grounding the story in a specific historical reality, but it also describes a culture of co-existence—an old world people and place situated neatly between paganism and Christianity. As an epic poem Beowulf describes the heroic journey of the titular character as he accepts the challenge of Hrothgar to defend his Hall against the monster Grendel. Beowulf defeats the monster and then must face the wrath of Grendel’s mother. Many decades after his victory over Grendel’s…… [Read More]

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Edward Robinson 1794-1864 Was an

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 67527594

Dr. David Livingstone seemed to epitomize this view, "These privations, I beg you to observe, are not sacrifices. I think that word ought never to be mentioned in reference to anything we can do for Him….Can that be a sacrifice which is simply paid back as a small part of a great debt owing to our God, which we can never repay… it is a privilege."

With this attitude of sacrifice for the greater glory, and it was certainly that for many who endured pain, pestilence, disease, hunger and bodily harm, also came a certain attitude about modernizing and bringing the native populations into the modern world through Christ. In places as diverse as Hawaii, the Philippines, central Africa, and even the Muslim world, these well-meaning missionaries invariable also brought with them cultural baggage and xenophobia. While wishing to save the population from the fires of Hell through Christianity, there…… [Read More]

Smith, E. (1834). Missionary Researches in Armenia: Including a Journey Through Asia Minor. London, J.S. Hudson. Cited in:  http://books.google.com/books?id=-c0NAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Eli+Smith&hl=en&ei=e0Y9TN3FG4rCsAP3xLjaCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CFYQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q&f=false 

Hallote, 2006, p.12.

Williams, J. (1999). The Times of Edward Robinson: Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature.
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Conversion Tactics of Mr Brown

Words: 1465 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17117724

Our Lord Himself stressed the importance of fewness...Our Lord used the whip only once in His life -- to drive the crowd away from the Church."(Achebe, 169)

On the other hand, Mr. Brown seems to have an overall positive contribution to the African community. Nevertheless, the author ironically implies that there is indeed only a difference in method between the two missionaries, and the decline of the Igbo culture already began under the more lenient government of Mr. Brown. For example, the school he builds can be seen as another way to indoctrinate the clan. This school is in fact the cause of other conflicts inside the Igbo community, since by attending this school an Igbo could become a 'court messenger', that is someone that would report and give out information from inside the clan to the white governors: "Mr. Brown's school produced quick results. A few months in it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Greenwich: Fawcett Publications, 1959
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The Face of Between the Native American Pueblo Tribe and Conquering Spaniards

Words: 4031 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81131792

Native Americans- evisiting the Struggles of 1680

What were the causes of the Pueblo revolt of 1680?

In the year 1680, Native Americans known as the Pueblo revolted against their Spanish conquerors in the American South West (Calloway, 2003). The Spaniards had dominated their lives, their souls and their lands for over eighty years. The Spanish colonists conquered and maintained their rule with terror and intimidation from the beginning when their troops under the command of Juan de Onate invaded the region in 1598 (Countryman 2013). When the natives in Acoma resisted, Oriate commanded that for all men over the age of 15 one leg should be chopped and the rest of the population should be enslaved, setting the tone for what was to be a brutal rule for the next 8 decades. The Pueblo people then rose as one community united by their resolve to unshackle the chains of…… [Read More]

References

Bolton, H.E, ed. Spanish Exploration of the Southwest, 1542-1706. New York: C. Scribner's Sons; New YorkC. Scribner's Sons, 1916.

Bowden, H. W. "Spanish Missions, Cultural Conflict and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680." Church History, 1975: 217-28.

Brugge, David M. "Pueblo Factionalism and External Relations." Ethnohistory, 1969.

Calloway, Colin. One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark . University of Nebraska Press, 2003.
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Traditional Se Asian Bamboo Flutes

Words: 28549 Length: 95 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 64807002



Some Chinese researchers assert that Chinese flutes may have evolved from of Indian provenance.

In fact, the kind of side-blon, or transverse, flutes musicians play in Southeast Asia have also been discovered in Africa, India, Saudi Arabia, and Central Asia, as ell as throughout the Europe of the Roman Empire. This suggests that rather than originating in China or even in India, the transverse flute might have been adopted through the trade route of the Silk Road to Asia. In addition to these transverse flutes, Southeast Asians possessed the kind of long vertical flutes; similar to those found in Central Asia and Middle East.

A considerable amount of similarities exist beteen the vertical flutes of Southeast Asia and flutes from Muslim countries. This type of flute possibly came from Persians during the ninth century; during the religious migration to SEA. Likeise, the nose-blon flute culture, common to a number of…… [Read More]

works cited:

Purple highlight means reference from his thesis, chapters 1-5

Blue highlight means reference from his raw research that was sent (17 files)

Yellow highlight means that writer could not find reference; one of the 17 files received

Gray highlight means writer found this source
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Mission and Silence Themes of

Words: 1304 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 503099



In both Silence and the Mission, violence breaks out among two types of European foreigners: those who would favor religious priorities over economic ones (the priests), and those who would favor economic priorities over religious ones (the European tradesmen in Silence and the Portuguese and Spanish bounty hunters in the Mission. Moreover, according to Pena, like the Jesuits in the Mission, who are alone, isolated, at odds with their church, and sometimes even each other, "Rodrigues' trials are exacerbated by his physical and cultural isolation... Culturally, he must confront being in a nation whose language and customs are mostly alien and threatening to him."

In the Mission, the story begins when a bounty-hunting Spaniard, Rodrigo, kills his younger brother Felipe over a woman they both love, but who loves only Felipe. Languishing in prison afterward, Rodrigo is certain that all is lost until he is visited in his prison cell…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Endo, Shusaku. Silence. London: Taplinger, 1980.

Joffe, Rolfe (Dir.). The Mission.

With Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons.

United Kingdom. 1986.
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Nelson Denoon From Norman Rush's

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35112140

Moon is an outsider and stranger from a strange American place who has found a home in a formerly colonized non-white area, like Denoon. The missionary family of the Quarriers and the anonymous narrator of Mating provide, by virtue of their recent entry into such societies, an outsider's view of such insider figures as Denoon and Moon.

In at Play in the Fields of the Lord, evangelical missionaries are attempting to spread their religion to the Indians, much as Denoon wished to spread the gospel of self-empowerment and chastity to the abused women of Tsau. But like Denoon's anthropological community, the missionary work and zeal of the missionaries proves be a mistaken example of artificial cultural tampering, and is destructive to both the missionaries and the Peru Indians' ways of life, just as Denoon's chaste utopia, however attractive to the narrator, is not really workable in reality.

Denoon's tampering is…… [Read More]

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Father Eusebio Kino

Words: 2705 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96697251

Father Eusebio Kino

This report is about Father Eusebio Kino who was possibly one of the greatest Spanish missionaries of all time. Over the course of his life, Father Kino influenced a great many individuals in the estern portion of the United States long before there was a Declaration of Independence. This report will attempt to present some of his greater accomplishments as well as an account of his interesting life. Over the course of thirty years, Father Kino worked untiringly as a pastor, explorer, teacher, rancher, farmer, ethnographer, diplomat and cartographer.

He is known for having founded over twenty five missions and maybe more importantly helping create extremely accurate maps of Arizona and the surrounding areas. Ironically, the Father was not even Spanish and he also did not even wish to be on the American continent. But his accomplishments were so astounding that he has been called the greatest…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Butler, Ron. "The Colors between Earth and Sky." Americas, March-April Volume 45 (1993).

Griffith, James S. A Shared Space: Folk Life in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands. Logan: Utah State UP, 1995.

Scully, Sean. "Kansas Getting Ready to Swap Statues in Capitol: Critics Concerned That Large Exodus Could Follow." The Washington Times [Washington] April 17, 1999.

Southard, Mark. "Howdy Pardner: Get Your Western Duds Ready!" PSA Journal, Vol. 62 February 1996.
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International Mission

Words: 1661 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40575010

Global Missions

Samuel Escobar is a well-known theologian within the Latin American community and viewed as one of the main participants in the International Congress on World Evangelism at Lausanne, Switzerland in 1974 over the years. He is also the president of the United Bible societies and of the International Fellowship of Evangelic Students and contributed immensely to the subject of global mission both in theory and practically. The contemporary Christian missions are compelled to comply with the global trends and the forces of globalization in order to remain relevant as opposed to the trends that were predominant in the third millennium of the Christian era. Escobar makes significant contribution and consequently influence on the aspect of contemporary global mission by exploring the new realities and forces of a globalized world as well as critically assessing the context of a vastly dynamic mission which hold to the earlier pedagogical teachings…… [Read More]

References

Escobar, S. (2003). The new global mission: The Gospel from Everywhere to Everyone. Downers Grove, IL:InterVarsity Press.

Escobar, S.E. (2003). A time for mission: the challenge for global Christianity. London: Inter-Varsity Press.

Greenman, J.P. (2012). Global theology in evangelical perspective: exploring the contextual nature of theology and mission. London: IVP Academic.

Taylor, W.D. (2000). Global missiology for the 21st century: the Iguassu dialogue. London: Baker Academic.
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Prayer for Paul and His

Words: 2505 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13426635

It is their way of participating in the mission itself without having to be there.

Prayer gives Paul strength. He asks others to pray for him to have strength when he was on a mission. Being on a mission can turn into a very lonely experience. He wanted prayer that he would be strong and lack timidity when it came to spreading the ord in a strange land. In Thessalonians, he writes, "Finally, brothers, pray for us that the message of the Lord may spread rapidly and be honored, just as it was with you" (II Thessalonians 3:1). Here we see Paul's needs in prayer. He needs protection, comfort and the knowing that he is looked after by those above and below the heavens. There is no doubt that Paul is understood the power of prayer. He knew that he would need it when he was serving in the mission…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Holy Bible, New International Version. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. 1988.
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California History- Indians the History

Words: 2417 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59420784

With all the resources of normal use for Indians in missionary control, Indians began to attack the missions and military forces to steal animal and take revenge of sexual assaults on Indian women. Continuous demand of laborers for the missions impacted the Indian tribes greatly and finally in 1836, the Mexican Republic who officially took over from Spain in 1823, took away the missions powers of obtaining forced labor from Indian and the missions collapsed.

One third of the California Indian population, over 100,000 Indians perished to deaths attributable to missions of California. The 1824 constitution of Mexican Republic promised Indians voting rights as citizens but they continued to be treated as slaves.

The discovery of Gold in California in 1848 subjected the Indians to the most horrible period of their history. California was seized by U.S. military from Mexico in 1846 and sufferings of the Indians multiplied by the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

California Indians Past and Present, [Online] retrieved from Internet on 21st April 2008,  http://www.allianceofcatribes.org/californiaindians.htm 

Census 2000, [Online] retrieved from Internet on 21st April 2008,  http://www.nahc.ca.gov/California 'sNativeAmerican, Eskimo and Alute populations.htm

Five Views: An Ethnic Site Survey for California, Nov. 2004, [Online] retrieved from Internet on 21st April 2008, http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/5views/5views1.htm

Heizer, R.F. The Destruction of California Indians: A Collection of Documents from the Period 1847 to 1865 in Which Are Described Some of the Things That Happened to Some of the Indians of California, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE, 1993.
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Nations Be Glad - Main

Words: 362 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46109434



While some people may be reluctant, Piper argues that there is no sacrifice that God is not worthy of. In other words, those that truly love and worship God should not refuse missionary work just because there may be some suffering involved. Anyone that is getting ready for missionary work, or even thinking about the idea of missionary work, would want to read this book and see what Piper has to say about the issue and why it is so important to reach out to all nations. There are others that would also benefit from this book, however, as the main point is about the supremacy of God and how the work that someone is doing can be seen as being important where God is concerned. While missionaries are the primary focus, those that work as pastors, campus ministers, and youth counselors could also benefit from the information that Piper…… [Read More]

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Native Societies and Disease Numerous Reports From

Words: 2339 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7428035

Native Societies and Disease

Numerous reports from European traders, missionaries, soldiers and explorers in the 16th and 17th Centuries reveal the same information about the devastating effect smallpox and other epidemic diseases had on the aboriginal populations of the Americas. Europeans were colonizing Africa and Asia at the same time, but "on no other continent in historic times has a combined disease and Construct phenomenon led to the collapse of an entire indigenous population."[footnoteRef:1] In 1492, Native Americans were one-fifth to one-sixth of the global population, but their numbers never came close to equaling that again after all the great epidemics that struck them in waves. Unlike China and India, where smallpox, plague, typhus, measles and influenza already existed, and therefore the local populations had more immunity and greatly outnumbered the European colonizers, aboriginal American societies routinely suffered mortality rates of 80 or 90%. Some forms of smallpox, such as…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hackett, Paul. "A Very Remarkable Sickness": Epidemics in the Petit Nord, 1670 to 1846. (University of Manitoba Press, 2002).

Trigger, Bruce G. Natives and Newcomers: Canada's "Heroic Age" Revisited (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1985).

Warrick, Garry A., "European Infections, Disease and Depopulation of the Wendat-Tionotate (Huron-Petun)" in Jordan F. Kerber (ed) Archaeology of the Iroquois: Selected Readings and Research Sources (Syracuse University Press, 2007), pp. 269-86.

Watts, Sheldon. Epidemics and History: Disease, Power and Imperialism (Yale University Press, 1997).
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2013 Max Points 180 Write Essay 1 250-1 500

Words: 1494 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 8196319

2013 Max Points: 180 Write essay (1,250-1,500 words) analyzes Escobar's thesis compares contrasts theological contribution theologians discussed earlier . Your paper explore components builds thesis, critique idea Christian theology contextual engaging theological schools American / global setting.

Samuel Escobar is known to be a leader within the Latin American Theology. He chaired the International Fellowship of Evangelical Students and is currently president of the United Bible Societies. He continues to live and teach in Spain.

In 1970, upon a meeting between several evangelicals who sought to free themselves from a fundamentalist American perspective, the Latin American Theological Fraternity was born. Its members, Samuel Escobar, G. ene Padilla, Orlando E. Costas, and Andrew Kirk wanted to reclaim a personal identity within a fraternity that was not bound to any church associations nor institutions. Instead, they sought to speak for an international and nondenominational environment. The Fraternity discussed theological issues in relation…… [Read More]

Reference list

Escobar, S. (2000). Evangelical missiology: peering into the future at the turn of the century. In W.D. Taylor (Ed.), Global Missiology for the 21st Century: The Iguassu Dialogue (101-122). Grand Rapids: Baker Academic.

Grenz, S.J. (1988). Wolfhart Pannenberg's quest for ultimate truth. Religion Online. Retrieved June 10, 2013, from http://www.religion-online.org/showarticle.asp?title=59

Scaer, D.P. (1970). Jurgen Moltmann and his theology of hope. Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, 13(2), 69-79.

Sutherland, J. (1998). Introduction to cross cultural ministry. Reconciliation Ministries Network. Retrieved June 10, 2013, from  http://rmni.org/global/Cross_Cultural.PDF