Missionaries Essays (Examples)

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Today there is more respect for the indigenous values of the natives and their languages. There were hard lessons learned in approach and strategy from the failures, such as in Canada, where native Aboriginal Indian children were torn, screaming from the arms of their parents to be placed in State-approved parochial schools, where they were forced to wear uniforms and stand in lines, forget their language and customs and conform to the strict behavioral guidelines of the nuns and priests, often being abused and starved in the process. The mental health issues and anger that were the result of this forced indoctrination, not to speak of the legal repercussions of that have ensued to this day (Miller 219).
Interviews with Biblical Scholars/Pastors/Reverends/Elders/Deacons / Church members as to why missionaries need to be sent?

Interviews with anthropologists regarding cultural imperialism.

Mission targets: the people who have been affected by missionaries might be interviewed….

Unreached People Group Project (Iraq)
Language

Culture

Economy

eligion

Family

A Survey of Mission Work

History of Mission Work

Current Status of the Church

Number of Known Believers

Challenges

Present Strategies

Unreached People Group Project (Iraq)

The history of Iraq parallels the antiquity of mankind; therefore, a more recent examination of Iraq's history will be more suitable for evaluating the needs of unreached people in this country. The country used to be part of the Ottoman Empire but Britain occupied Iraq during World War I.

In this regard, Dawisha reports that, "Iraq was patched up together into a monarchy by the British in 1921 from three disparate provinces of the defunct Ottoman Empire. Divisions were so deep that when it came to choosing a ruler for the new state, the British realized that no local candidate would command the support of the whole population."

The country was designated a League of Nations mandate administered by the UK in 1920. Iraq subsequently gained independence and in….

missionaries
PAGES 2 WORDS 603

Historical Context
The Reformed Church in America is a contemporary missionary organization that does not offer a clear organizational history. However, the RCA Global Mission page on the organization’s website claims 233 years of missionary work (“RCA Global Mission,” 2018). The RCA and its missionary work can also be viewed within the overall historical context of colonialism and the evolution of post-colonial missionary work. One of the letters refers to the Beebout’s visit to a former slave trade port in Benin, as the authors reflect on the inhumanity of slavery without mentioning the complicity of Christians with the institution of slavery in the United States.

Message

A collection of videos and letters offer primary source data about the nature of Jeremy and Susan Beebout’s missions within the RCA. The most recently touted mission is the partnership with the Evangelical Church of the Republic of Niger (EERN). An analysis of the most recent ten….

Missionary Conquest: A critical analysis
It is often said that there is nothing so dangerous as a convert or a missionary. Although many take this idea as a kind of "tongue in cheek" characterization of the excesses of those "blinded by faith," there remains a sinister truth in the statement. George Tinker's book, Missionary Conquest: The Gospel and Native American Cultural Genocide, clearly illustrates the dark side of missionary work, and the damage that can, and has been done to Native American cultures and peoples as a result of the inherent coupling of colonialism/ethnocentrism and religion -- what he calls, "religion in the service of evil." However, although Tinker does a wonderful job in pointing out the unfortunate "Anglo-centrism" of the missionaries he discusses, as well as the horrible price Native Americans would pay as a result of their efforts, he does not acknowledge the difficulty his position as a Christian….

Paul's First Missionary Journey
The conversion of Paul from Saul on his way to Damascus marked the beginning of his evangelical work.

Paul and arnabas were believers in the newly established church in Antioch of Syria.

They received the calling from God while in church praying alongside leaders of the church.

Paul was dogmatic, without proper strategy and planning for his missionary journey.

The first missionary journey of Paul

Paul's first missionary journey began at Antioch of Syria

He sailed with arnabas, and john Mark as their helper.

John Mark made his decision and left them as they arrived at Pisidia

Paul travelled through the following places, preaching the Good News and making disciples; the island of Cyprus, Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra and Derbie

Through his missionary work, he received mixed reception, some places acceptance and others wild rejection, to the point of being stoned.

Paul's strategy in his missionary work

Paul used varied strategies in fulfilling his calling to the….

acculturative stress of African Catholic Missionary Nuns (ACMN) serving in the United States. This chapter is divided into five parts. The first part explains the meaning of acculturation and adaptation experiences specific to missionaries. This part emphasizes (1) different perspectives from social and behavioral scientists examining the phenomenon of acculturation (2) different theoretical models describing the stages of acculturation (3) dissimilarities between immigrants and missionary immigrants and what makes the two unique. The second part of this chapter examines the emotional and psychological distress missionaries experience as a result of acculturative stress. The third part focuses on coping strategies and resilience of missionaries. The fourth part introduces the existing literature in the area of acculturative stress of missionaries, emphasizing on limited empirical research in this subject and the necessity for further research in this area of study.
Part One: Background and Overview

Different Social and Behavioral Scientific Perspectives Concerning Acculturation. The….

Pastoral Theology: The Modern ole of Mission Work in the Church
Historically, mission work played a critical role in the establishment of the Christian Church. Christians were called to spread Christianity beyond their initial groups of worshippers and the concept of the mission to spread religion gradually developed over time. Over the course of history, these missions have taken varying forms, though mission work has frequently combined the provision of some type of help with introductions to the basic tenets of Christianity. Modern mission work continues to combine these two elements, but in varying ways. Christians are no less called to spread the Gospel than they were in the early days, when Christianity was a new religion and unknown to many of the people of the world. Spreading the Gospel is about more than giving people information about Christianity; for mission workers, spreading the Gospel is about letting people know what….

Biblical Mission
PAGES 7 WORDS 2633

Christian Church acknowledges its missionary function as truly the core of Christianity, the heart of the Church. Through Christ's teachings, mission is the foreground of His legacy to the Church, the instrument for redemption. The guiding principles at the basis of the Church's mission exist as transparently related by the ible which in itself transcends all worldly knowledge and phenomena. God, as the Holy Trinity, reveals Himself through the biblical record in order to communicate with man candidly and openly, sends His only son into the world in order to claim Him back to the offspring of wholeness, and puts forth a missionary pattern for His followers: "A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another." (John 13:34, 15:17 King James ible) "And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach….

Jesuit Relations
PAGES 4 WORDS 1372

Jesuit elations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth-Century North America edited by Allan Greer. Specifically it will consider the role the Jesuit missionaries played in the history of New France circa 1633-1665. This book is an important historical document because it preserves many of the practices and parts of the Northeast Native American culture that are now long gone. eading this book is an excellent introduction to Native American culture and values in the early seventeenth-century, and it is valuable for research into the culture, beliefs, and values at the time.
The Jesuits were not in Canada and the Northeast to alter their way of thinking. Their main goals were to colonize and covert the areas to French Christianity. As the editor notes in the Introduction, "And of course, the Jesuits themselves were determined to reshape native thinking and behavior in conformity with Christian principles" (Greer 11). At the time when….

A further development in American Baptism was the evolution of its missionary organization. The rapid growth of missionary zeal, partly as a result of the many accounts by missionaries such as the Judsons, soon resulted in more than one societal ministry supported by the convention.
Meanwhile, Dr. Carey informed Adoniram Judson that he might as well abandon Burma as a missionary destination. He related the experiences of his son William, who had been in the country for four years and was all but ready to give up

. Unable to remain in India any longer, the Judsons then abandoned the Burmese idea in favor of Java or Penang. However, this was not to be. The East India Company continued hounding them to leave the country; the time-sensitive nature of their departure then led the couple to take the only ship available from Madras, which was bound for angoon in Burma. Here….

" It caused missionaries to deal with peoples of other cultures and even Christian traditions -- including the Orthodox -- as inferior. God's mission was understood to have depended upon human efforts, and this is why we came to hold unrealistic universalistic assumptions. Christians became so optimistic that they believed to be able to correct all the ills of the world." (Vassiliadis, 2010)
Missiology has been undergoing changes in recent years and after much serious consideration Christians in the ecumenical era "are not only questioning all the above assumptions of the Enlightenment; they have also started developing a more profound theology of mission. One can count the following significant transitions:

(a) From the missio christianorum to the missio ecclesiae;

(b) the recognition later that subject of mission is not even the Church, either as an institution or through its members, but God, thus moving further from the missio ecclesiae to the missio Dei,….

William Carey -- Father of Modern Missions
William Carey

Britain

Moravians

India

Modern Missions

William Carey, a Baptist preacher, is considered to be the Father of Modern Mission. Carey believed absolutely that the Word of God was to be taken to all nations, devoted his own life to this endeavor, and challenged other believers to engage in this sacred work. In terms of sheer numbers of converts, Carey's accomplishments would be considered small, particularly when measured against the standards in place today. William Carey demonstrated that one man's vision be the catalyst for a movement that will serve God and others in s manner that adheres to the great commission. When Carey first made his ideas about carrying the Word to people around the world, he was told by his ministering peers to sit down and give up the unrealistic and non-mandated idea. But Carey's vision stood fast on the foundation of his spiritual beliefs and….

"he final third are an estimated 10,000 "people group," or 2.1 billion humans, who for reasons of language or geography have never heard about the Christ of Christmas. And reaching them, missionaries say, involves crossing physical, political, and linguistic barriers." hose barriers will not always be gracious, not always be welcoming, but it goes without saying that devoted Christians do, and will continue, to overcome those barriers to touch the lives of other who have yet to experience the inspiration of the Word of God.
Not a Competition

here is not a competition for souls in Christian missionary work. Missionary work does not use people as human pawns on the chessboard of world politics.

Sometimes, it may be difficult for people, and missionaries alike, to understand that. Christians missionaries serve vital roles in places around the world where each day people lose the battle against the natural forces of nature, the evil….

PASTORAL THEOLOGY (MISSION): A Review and Assessment of Book Chapters on Mission
The key ideas in these chapters are that the idea of mission is rooted in the Bible and in the actions of the early Church, as the missionaries spread throughout the world taking with them the ord of God and giving it to those individuals and groups of people/communities who embraced it and wanted to live their lives according to this ord. The ord was the Mission Statement, so to speak, of the early Church, and the Bible makes this very clear. From the beginning, God's chosen had an affinity with the non-chosen, that is, the Gentiles, of whom Our Lord counted Himself as one. Thus, the perspective of the early missionaries was this: they were not going out to preach to people they did not know but rather to people who were indeed their brothers in sisters in….

Paul's Early Life (birth, Upbringing, And Early Education)
Paul's early life can be dated back from 1-33 A.D. His upbringing comprised of being born in Tarsus of Cilicia, where he was raised under another name, Saul. He was raised in a Jewish, strict household. Because Paul was Jewish, he received abbinic training in Jerusalem from abbi Gamaliel. As he received his training, he also learned the traditions of the Pharisees. Later on in this period, Paul worked with the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem as well as adopting the Sanhedrin policies. The Sanhedrin were in opposition of the church and so was Paul. Including Jewish culture, Paul received immersion into Hellenistic culture of the era, which meant he went to the gymnasium, attended Greek dramas at the Amphitheatre, and was knowledge on the various schools of Greek Philosophy. Gamaliel taught Paul the Scriptures including the traditional lessons of the Pharisees. This meant Paul….

In order to really understand resistance in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, it is important to look at all of the characters and not just the highlighted European males, such as the protagonist Marlowe, that sit at the center of the story.  That is because resistance is the undercurrent behind all of the action in the story.  The main characters are always acting against the threat of resistance by the African people who are often portrayed as victims, but are consistently offering resistance to the colonizers, as evidenced by the arrow attack by the natives on the ship. ....

British Occupation and the Shaping of Nyasaland's Administration and Development
Nyasaland, present-day Malawi, underwent significant changes during British occupation, which began in 1891. The British imposed their colonial administrative system, implemented economic policies, and established educational and healthcare institutions, all of which had profound effects on the country's development.
Administrative System:
Establishment of Colonial Rule: The British declared Nyasaland a protectorate in 1891, bringing it under direct British colonial rule. The British established a governor and an executive council to govern the territory.
Indirect Rule: The British adopted a policy of indirect rule, where they governed through existing local authorities, such as....

Historical Roots of Filipino Indolence
The perception of Filipino indolence has deep historical roots in the colonial era. During Spanish rule (1565-1898), Europe's industrial revolution was transforming societies, while the Philippines remained largely agrarian. This led to a stark divide in economic development and attitudes towards work.
Spanish Stereotyping: Spanish colonizers viewed Filipinos as inherently lazy and backward, based on their own cultural biases. This stereotype was reinforced by accounts of missionaries and explorers who described indigenous communities as having leisure-oriented lifestyles.
Limited Economic Opportunities: The colonial government's mercantilist policies restricted economic growth in the Philippines, limiting opportunities for Filipinos to....

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7 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Missionaries in the Amazon Missionaries

Words: 3240
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Today there is more respect for the indigenous values of the natives and their languages. There were hard lessons learned in approach and strategy from the failures, such…

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15 Pages
Research Paper

History - Israel

Challenges Facing Christian Missionaries in Post-Gulf War Iraq

Words: 4848
Length: 15 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Unreached People Group Project (Iraq) Language Culture Economy eligion Family A Survey of Mission Work History of Mission Work Current Status of the Church Number of Known Believers Challenges Present Strategies Unreached People Group Project (Iraq) The history of Iraq parallels the…

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2 Pages
Essay

Africa / African Studies

missionaries

Words: 603
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Historical Context The Reformed Church in America is a contemporary missionary organization that does not offer a clear organizational history. However, the RCA Global Mission page on the organization’s website…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Native Americans

George Tinker's Book Missionary Conquest

Words: 1663
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Missionary Conquest: A critical analysis It is often said that there is nothing so dangerous as a convert or a missionary. Although many take this idea as a kind of…

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8 Pages
Research Paper

Mythology - Religion

Paul's First Missionary Journey the Conversion of

Words: 3166
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Paul's First Missionary Journey The conversion of Paul from Saul on his way to Damascus marked the beginning of his evangelical work. Paul and arnabas were believers in the newly established…

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20 Pages
Literature Review

Anthropology

Acculturative Stress and Psychological Wellbeing of African Missionary Nuns Working in the USA

Words: 6281
Length: 20 Pages
Type: Literature Review

acculturative stress of African Catholic Missionary Nuns (ACMN) serving in the United States. This chapter is divided into five parts. The first part explains the meaning of acculturation…

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5 Pages
Essay

Sociology - Miscellaneous

Living the Word How to Engage in Missionary Work in a Non Imperial Manner

Words: 1726
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Pastoral Theology: The Modern ole of Mission Work in the Church Historically, mission work played a critical role in the establishment of the Christian Church. Christians were called to spread…

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7 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Biblical Mission

Words: 2633
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Christian Church acknowledges its missionary function as truly the core of Christianity, the heart of the Church. Through Christ's teachings, mission is the foreground of His legacy to…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Native Americans

Jesuit Relations

Words: 1372
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Jesuit elations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth-Century North America edited by Allan Greer. Specifically it will consider the role the Jesuit missionaries played in the history of New…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Luther Rice and Adoniram Judson

Words: 3429
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

A further development in American Baptism was the evolution of its missionary organization. The rapid growth of missionary zeal, partly as a result of the many accounts by…

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35 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Global Changes in the Missiology

Words: 9755
Length: 35 Pages
Type: Term Paper

" It caused missionaries to deal with peoples of other cultures and even Christian traditions -- including the Orthodox -- as inferior. God's mission was understood to have depended…

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12 Pages
Research Paper

Mythology - Religion

William Carey and the Grand Commitment

Words: 3216
Length: 12 Pages
Type: Research Paper

William Carey -- Father of Modern Missions William Carey Britain Moravians India Modern Missions William Carey, a Baptist preacher, is considered to be the Father of Modern Mission. Carey believed absolutely that the Word of…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

Responsibilities of Christians as Regards

Words: 1160
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

"he final third are an estimated 10,000 "people group," or 2.1 billion humans, who for reasons of language or geography have never heard about the Christ of Christmas.…

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3 Pages
Essay

Theology

The Meaning of Mission in the Bible

Words: 1037
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

PASTORAL THEOLOGY (MISSION): A Review and Assessment of Book Chapters on Mission The key ideas in these chapters are that the idea of mission is rooted in the Bible and…

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6 Pages
Essay

Mythology - Religion

Paul's Early Life Birth Upbringing and Early

Words: 1854
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

Paul's Early Life (birth, Upbringing, And Early Education) Paul's early life can be dated back from 1-33 A.D. His upbringing comprised of being born in Tarsus of Cilicia, where he…

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