Filter By:

Sort By:

Reset Filters

We have over 1000 essays for "School Discipline"

Having trouble coming up with an Essay Title?

Use our essay title generator to get ideas and recommendations instantly

Reforming Urban Schools
Words: 13440 Length: 49 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79283099
Read Full Paper  ❯

School Choice Program

This study aimed to determine the impact of school choice through a comparative study of two private schools, which serve primarily, or exclusively African-American students, and a public school.

Data in student achievement in math and reading and data on student attendance were used to determine the impact of choosing a school. Qualitative data derived from interviews with administrators and faculty as well as classroom observation were used to provide additional insight regarding the intellectual climate of the two private schools and the public school.

The focus of this study was on mathematics and reading in middle school students in both public and private schools in Milwaukee, as well as the focus of reform in the state -- reading in Michigan, writing in Vermont and California. This approach enabled me to adequately address my research questions and prove or disprove my hypotheses.

To begin, I conducted structured…

Bibliography

Brown, Andrew (1995). Organizational Culture. London: Pitman Publishing.

Dianda, Marcella. Corwin, Ronald. (February 1993). What a Voucher Could Buy: A Survey of California's Private Schools. Far West Lab for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, California and Southwest Regional Lab Survey Results.

Fuller, Bruce. (1995). Who Gains, Who Loses from School Choice: A Research Summary. ERIC Document Reproduction Services No. ED385928.

Greene, Jay. Peterson, Paul. Du, Jiangtao. (1997). Effectiveness of School Choice: The Milwaukee Experiment. Occasional Paper 97, Program in Education Policy and Governance Center for American Political Studies, Department of Government, Harvard University.

School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs the
Words: 9042 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 8170287
Read Full Paper  ❯

They predict age and gender variations relate to bullying concerns. Of the 25 cartoons implemented in the study, two depict characters with different shades of skin color where skin color appeared to be an issue. One cartoon relating to sexual orientation was not used in several countries. Smith et al. report Olweus to assert bullying to be characterized by the following three criteria:

1. It is aggressive behavior or intentional "harmdoing"

2. which carried out repeatedly and over time

3. In an interpersonal relationship characterized by an imbalance of power. (Smith et al., 2002, p. 1120)

In their study, Smith et al. (2002), participating researchers in the 14 countries to completed the following

1. Listed and selected bullying terms as well as social exclusion in the applicable language.

2. Used fundamental focus groups with participating children to confirm usage and extensive comprehensive of terms.

3. Using cartoons, sorted tasks to…

REFERENCES

Anti-Bullying programs for schools. (2009). NoBully.com. Retrieved March 3, 2010 from  http://www.nobully.com/index.html 

Beaty, L.A., & Alexeyev, E.B. (2008). The Problem of School Bullies: What the Research Tells Us. Adolescence, 43(169), 1+. Retrieved March 3, 2010, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5026476147 

Beran, T.N., Tutty, L. & Steinrath, G. (2004). An evaluation of a bullying prevention program for elementary schools. Canadian Journal of School Psychology. Vol. 19, Iss. 1/2, p. 99

116 . Retrieved March 3, 2010 from  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1188387401&Fmt=4&clientId=9269&RQT=30

School Choice Has Been a
Words: 2363 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33009890
Read Full Paper  ❯

These issues of professionalism and innovation seem to be a major problem in many public schools in America. In recent years these issues have come to light as teachers have been disciplined and even fired for their interactions with students that have been unprofessional and even criminal at times. Teachers have an ethical responsibility to act professionally and when they fell to do so the ability of students to excel academically is also compromised.

The aforementioned authors also mention the lack of innovation that often occurs as a result of using democratic methods. One of the reasons why school choice is even an issue is because the curriculums that have been implemented in public schools lack variety. Part of the reason for this lack of innovation has to do with bureaucracy and government mandates such as the No Child Left Behind Act. This particular act stifles innovation because many teachers…

Works Cited

Cullen, J.B. Brian A. Jacob and Steven D. Levitt (2005) The impact of school choice on student outcomes: an analysis of the Chicago Public Schools. Journal of Public Economics. 89 (5-6):729-760

Hastings, Justine S. Thomas J. Kane Douglas Staiger (2005) Parental Preferences and School Competition: Evidence from a Public School Choice Program .Yale Economic Applications and Policy Discussion Paper No. 10

Moe, Terry. 2001. Schools, Vouchers and the American Public. Washington: Brookings Institution Press

Sikkink, D., Emerson M.O. (2008) School choice and racial segregation in U.S. schools: The role of parents' education. Ethnic and Racial Studies 31(2): 267-293

School Closure Research -- Peggy
Words: 5260 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 79662216
Read Full Paper  ❯



Transportation

Students who are bussed to a larger school can use the time to be productive; reading, homework, etc.

1.5-2 hours per day of commuting is unacceptable for students and will eat into their family and work time.

Opportunities

A larger school will provide greater opportunity for social networks, sports, music, drama, and more extracurricular activities.

Loss of community will make the younger students uncomfortable as well.

Academics

A larger school will provide greater academic opportunities for the HS students in preparation for university; there are more resources available.

The student to teach ratio will change and the students will be part of just another large classroom.

Thus, the question really comes down to potential. Neither side can equivocally state that the future of the students will be better or worse; there are arguments for both as well as the possibility that the solution will be quite positive for some,…

REFERENCES

Cary, S. (2003). A Beginner's Guide to the Scientific Method. New York: Wadsworth.

Cresswell, J. (2003). Research Design. New York: Sage.

Groves, R. a. (2003). Introducing Political Philosophy. New York: Icon Books.

Hatton, J. (1996). Science and Its Ways of Knowing. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Benjamin Cummings Publishers.

School to Work Transition of
Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71477576
Read Full Paper  ❯

Parental consent will also be sought for an individual to be a participant in the project. It is expected that 110 persons would participate in the project; this will be the final number after the initial screening has taken place and the unsuitable candidates removed from the initial listing.

Data collection

The data will be collected using questionnaires which will be administered at the beginning of the program to establish a baseline position. Then a similar questionnaire will be administered at the end of the project so that values can be compared and variation in responses observed.

Action steps and time frame

I. Clarification of concepts (Two weeks)

II. Development of data collection instruments (Two weeks)

III. Training of personnel (One week)

IV. Identification of schools and contact with schools (One Week)

V. eception and Orientation of participants (One day)

VI. Development of baseline assessment (One day)

VII. Conduct of…

References

Lu, W., Daleiden, E., & Lu, S. (2007) Threat Perception Bias and Anxiety Among

Chinese School Children and Adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychology 36(4):568-580.

Mueser, Kim T. et al. (2008). A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in severe mental illness. Journal of Consulting and Clinical

Schools and Parents Effective Staff
Words: 3287 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81939847
Read Full Paper  ❯

And when the parent comes to an event held in the classroom, it makes good sense to have interpreters available, and "invite the extended family," which of course is a very welcoming act of kindness and good judgment. The other parent in this list of "types" is the "Busy Parent," who is a person with a work schedule that is hard to get a hold of, or plan meetings for. Get the cell phone number of parents like this, and the email addresses, and "continue to send home their children's work on a regular basis, including writing samples, artwork, and test copies" - and even consider taking digital photos of class activities and attaching those pictures to emails that go to parents.

On a more serious note, the literature on school administration duties as far as training staff to be parent-active and family-friendly offers an article called "here's the Ministry…

Works Cited

Beaudoin, Nelson. (2006). Giving Stakeholders a Voice. Educational Leadership, 63(8), 74-75.

Flannery, Mary Ellen. (2005). A field guide to parents: famed for its vast appetite for information

And ability to protect its offspring, the parent genus has nonetheless eluded scientific study.

Until now. NEA Today, 24(2), 36-38.

School Profile the Technological Advances
Words: 526 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58871792
Read Full Paper  ❯

The dedication shown by the principal, M. Jett, and the two instructors was truly tremendous, and it is obvious that the high-risk students attending ACE Academy are well served. The cramped environment, however, provides a challenge whose effects cannot really be mitigated while the school remains in the same space.

Though ACE Academy is only in its first year of operation, one way in which it could improve its educational process would be to establish an ongoing collaborative system of course adjustment and development, especially with the other schools in the county from which ACE's students come. This enables faster, more effective, and more directly needs-based instruction and courses to be developed (Lake 2003). The expansion of the school's physical size could also allow for the hiring of more instructors (in addition to the two currently employed by ACE Academy), which would further reduce the current student-teacher ratio and allow…

References

Jett, G. (2010). Personal interview, February 11.

Lake, E. (2003). "Course Development Cycle Time: A Framework for Continuous Process Improvement." Innovative higher education 28(10< pp. 21-33.

Education Uniforms in School
Words: 1895 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32854610
Read Full Paper  ❯

school uniforms within a school system. Ideas such as school discipline, student behavior, and academic achievement are discussed along with examples of why different schools have implemented student use of uniforms. Various viewpoints are presented, along with proponents and opponents concerns for the actual implementation of uniforms.

IMPLEMENTATION OF SCHOOL UNIFORMS ITHIN A SCHOOL SYSTEM: AFFECTS ON DISCIPLINE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Many schools across the United States have adopted school uniforms to meet the needs for a mandatory dress code. There are many opposing arguments on the issue of whether public school students in the United States should be required to wear uniforms or obey dress codes. Improvement of discipline and academic performance, reduction of fashion competition among students are a few of the reasons given in support of implementing school uniforms. However, the opposing viewpoints maintain that requiring school uniforms are a violation of students' First Amendment right to…

Works Cited

Brunsma, David. "Effects of Student Uniforms on Attendance, Behavior Problems, Substance Use and Academic Achievement." Journal of Educational Research 92 (1998) 53-63.

Clinton, William J. Text of Presidential Memo to Secretary of Education on School Uniforms Washington DC: U.S. Newswire, 1996.

Clinton, William J. Transcript of Presidential Radio Address to the Nation.

Washington DC: U.S. Newswire, 1996.

Detention Suspension and Expulsion Effect of Disciplinary Policy in Public School
Words: 4451 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12423838
Read Full Paper  ❯

Detention, Suspension,

AND EXPULSION:

EFFECT OF DISCIPLINAY POLICY

Instrument to be used

Participants

Future use of study results

Over the last few decades the institution of education has undergone many changes. One of the most scrutinized areas of education currently is the area of discipline. The recent rash of violence across the nation at high school has caused the focus to turn to discipline. The Columbine killings among other violent school events have caused experts to begin looking at bullies, violence, at risk students and others to discover what the key is to turning them around in their school career. One discipline method that has been used for years is removal of the offending student from the general student population. The student who is removed is done so either through suspension or expulsion. Suspension and expulsion are used in many situations as discipline. When students break zero tolerance policies, or…

References

Aisha Sultan; And Holly Hacker; Of The Post-Dispatch, METRO EAST SUSPENSION RATE IS TWICE THE STATE AVERAGE: PARENTS ARE ALARMED, BUT ADMINISTRATORS SAY ORDER MUST BE MAINTAINED., St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 02-24-2002, pp C1.

Brian, Bumbarger. School Violence: Disciplinary Exclusion Prevention and Alternatives. Universties Children's Policy Partnership. 1999.

VOS Inger, Cambridge cuts suspensions., Waikato Times (New Zealand), 12-01-2001, pp 3.

Robert L. Morgan; Travis S. Loosli; Sebastian Striefel, REGULATING THE USE OF BEHAVIORAL PROCEDURES IN SCHOOLS: A FIVE-YEAR FOLLOW-UP SURVEY OF STATE DEPARTMENT STANDARDS. Vol. 30, Journal of Special Education, 01-15-1997.

Assertive Discipline on Social Relationships
Words: 3128 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3967674
Read Full Paper  ❯

(ehavior Management Themes, 2007)

The basic rights of teacher in their classrooms include: (1) the right to establish optimal learning environments; (2) the right to request and express appropriate behavior; and (3) the right to receive help from administrators and parents as needed. (ehavior Management Themes, 2007) the basic rights of students in the classroom include: (1) the right to have teachers who help limit self-destructing behavior; and (2) the right to choose how to behave. (ehavior Management Themes, 2007) These rights and needs of students are most optimally met through use of assertive discipline in which the teacher "...clearly communicates the expectations to the students and consistently follows-up with appropriate actions, but never violates, the best interests of the students." (ehavior Management Themes, 2007) the work of Usha McNab entitled: "The Individual and the Whole Class" states that: "that the teacher needs to work on creating a social and…

Bibliography

Behavior Management Theories (2007) Online available at  http://blog.os42.com/behaviour-management-theories/ .

Carey, Timothy a. (2007) What is Different About Different Discipline Programs? Difference in School Discipline and Classroom Management Programs. Online available at  http://responsiblethinking.com/different.htm .

Collier, Denise L. (2006) Sally Can Skip but Jerome Can't Stomp: Perceptions, Practice and School Punishment (Preliminary Results) April 2006. Online available at http://www.gse.uci.edu/csu-uci-edd/proposals/DLCollier-Proposal.pdf.

McNab, Usha (nd) the Individual and the Whole Class. Online available at http://www.partnership.mmu.ac.uk/cme/Student_Writings/DMELE/Usha_McNab.html. UNC Charlotte Behavior and Reading Improvement Center. Online available at  http://education.uncc.edu/bric/intervention_descriptions.htm#Assertive%20Discipline

Student Discipline and Bullying
Words: 2164 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99830650
Read Full Paper  ❯

Student Bullying/Discipline
1. Abstract
According to the Illinois Legal Aid Online (2018) Bullying can be understood as the aggressive and unwanted traits espoused by school going children. The traits entail some perceived or real power imbalance. Some of the students will use this power (such as their physical strength, popularity, access to privileged information) to harm, blackmail or harm other students. This behavior has to be repeated or have the potential of being repeated for it to qualify as bullying (Illinois Legal Aid Online, 2018). This paper explores a bullying scenario and maps out a strategy to alleviate bullying among students. In doing so the paper quotes three cases (i.e. Goss v. Lopez, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, and New Jersey v. T.L.O). The rulings in these cases will be used to delineate the process of investigation, disciplining of bullies and bullying prevention measures. The paper also…

Mandatory School Uniform Policies
Words: 2022 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16475790
Read Full Paper  ❯

students what they think about school uniforms, they're likely to dismiss them with a summary: They're ugly.

If you ask school administrators and teachers what they think, you're likely to get only slightly more nuanced responses. Some school officials believe that uniforms are a godsend in terms of reducing discipline problems - including violence - and in instilling a sense of pride and mission in the student. Others - in the minority - believe that they stifle individuality.

And if you ask parents what they think, they usually approve of uniforms because they are cheaper and prevent fights in the morning with children who want to wear plunging necklines or dragging cuffs.

Is there a single truth about school uniforms that lies somewhere in the middle of all of these differing opinions? Or is it simply a ashoman-like tale, with differing reports from all of those concerned?

This research project…

Robbins 2002.

A www.aclu.org

Martinez 2002.

Attitudes and Values of High School Students
Words: 9798 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70089566
Read Full Paper  ❯

attitudes and values of high school students. eforms to the high school system in the United States are also explained. Additionally, the reason why students need not be involved in the planning of reforms is elucidated.

High School Students: their Attitudes and Values

Of a crucial age, climbing a milestone, conscious to their fullest with no fear of prospects, high school students have interested researchers and policy makers for centuries. They have quite a few common traits -- they behave as individuals of their own age group in a rather full-fledged way. They are go-getting to achieve their independence, they are show-offs, impressionable persons desiring to be their best (something to be learned) and to suit the times they live in. Their self-esteem is fragile and they are pretty sensitive to criticism, attention, and dilemmas, for instance, within their families.

Students from different socioeconomic backgrounds behave differently as has been…

References

Barber, A. (1997. March). Rough language plagues schools, educators say. USA Today, pp 06D.

Committee for increasing high school students' engagement and motivation to learn. National Academies. Internet. http://www4.nas.edu/cp.nsf/Projects+_by+_PIN/BCYF-I-01-01-A?OpenDocument.Available on August 25, 2003.

Doyle, M. Failing to connect: Schools face increased pressure when students flunk classes. The Columbian, March 16, 2003, pp Front Page.

Educational reforms and students at risk: A review of the current state of the art. (1994. January). Internet.  http://www.ed.gov/pubs/EdReformStudies/EdReforms/.Available  on August 25, 2003.

School Crime Including the Characteristics
Words: 2347 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 8865251
Read Full Paper  ❯

Several areas, if poorly designed, can lead to violent and criminal behavior, including parking lots, isolated spots on campus, locker rooms, and corridors. Often, violent behavior occurs in these areas when adults are not present (Astor, Meyer, and Behre, 1999, p. 3). Designing schools with more open areas, more planned classrooms, and a more defined perimeter can create a safer, less violent campus by creating a more functional and enjoyable educational experience. Thus, older, poorly designed schools often attract more violent behavior.

Location can also be a risk factor in certain schools, although that is not always the case. Another researcher notes, "Some urban schools are located [...] in slum neighborhoods where drug sellers routinely kill one another, as well as innocent bystanders, on the streets surrounding the school" (Toby, 1994, p.169). Children growing up in violence prone neighborhoods such as these may simply accept violence as a way of…

References

Astor, R.A. Meyer, H.A. And Behre, W.J. (1999). Unowned places and times: Maps and interviews about violence in high schools. American Educational Research Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1, 3-42.

Crowe, T.D. (1990). Designing safer schools. School Safety. 43-47.

Jenkins, P.H.(1997). School delinquency and the school social bond. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 34 No. 3, 337-367.

May, D.C. (September 1999). Scared kids, unattached kids, or peer pressure: Why do students carry firearms to school? Youth & Society, Vol. 31 No. 1, 100-127.

Schools & At-Risk Students Continuation
Words: 4822 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7828581
Read Full Paper  ❯

The author of the article, "Achieving the Challenge: Meeting Standards in the Continuation High School" (Stits, 2001) related that "prior to 1983, many continuation high schools existed in districts where expectations were limited to keeping the students in school as much as possible," and also the ideas was to keep those continuation students "away from the traditional high school campus." The implication was clear: there was a stigma that students in continuation school were bad seeds, and the idea was to keep them away from the mainstream lest they have a negative effect on the "good students" in the regular high school.

But eventually, the image of continuations schools in California changed, as communities more and more were trying to prevent school dropouts, and the need for a high school diploma became more important, as well, Stits writes.

HO DO CONTINUATION SCHOOLS OPERATE?

In an article in the journal Thrust…

Works Cited

Arlington Public Schools. (2005). Alternative Education: Purpose, Mission, Beliefs. Retrieved Nov. 10, 2007, at  http://www.apsva.us/hsc .

Community College Week. (2004). R.I. Plan Would Help at-risk Students.

Hardy, Lawrence. (2007). Children at Risk: Graduation Day. American School Board Journal,

No. 37907. Retrieved Nov. 11, 2007, at  http://www.asbj.com .

School Prepare Children for Life -- and
Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87988634
Read Full Paper  ❯

school prepare children for life -- and should it? The public school system in the United States has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. It has become a required institution in which children spend a minimum of 12.5 years and more time than in any other place than home for their formative years. Thomas Jefferson, for instance, believed that universal education would have to precede universal suffrage. The ignorant, he argued, were incapable of self-government. But he had profound faith in the reasonableness and ability of the masses and in their collective wisdom when educated. As one of the founding fathers, Jefferson in fact set the precedent for American education: reading, writing, mathematics, the Classics, and European and American History.

The American Educational system is supported in several ways -- primarily through taxation and Federal/State grant money. It is this support that gives us a clue as to the…

School Situation
Words: 1419 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18918987
Read Full Paper  ❯

Circles Model for an Inner City School

"I am shocked by the lack of urgency we are showing for the deplorable situation in our inner-city schools and their neighborhoods…students trapped, going to school in a community devoid of hope or opportunity, should challenge our moral sensibilities" (Brown, 2011, Jersey Journal).

Inner city schools (including those in Trenton, NJ) tend to be plagued by similar and familiar problems. According to a peer-reviewed article in the Journal of Urban Affairs (Glickman, et al., 2008), inner city communities continue to suffer from "disinvestment" (lack of funding sources), "outmigration" (whites moving to suburbs), and "abandoned property" and a sense of gloom that is reflected in schools. Also, the inner city is known for low income citizens, "predominantly minority," and their plight is often reflected in schools (Glickman, 557). And the poor conditions in inner cities -- including those neighborhoods in Trenton, New Jersey --…

Works Cited

Brown, N. (2011). Opinion: N.J. must improve cities to improve schools. Jersey Journal.

Retrieved August 20, 2013, from  http://www.nj.com .

Glickman, N.J., and Scally, C.P. (2008). Can Community and Education Organizing Improve

Inner-City Schools? Journal of Urban Affairs, 30(5), 557-577.

Disciplines My Writing for a
Words: 1880 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84493387
Read Full Paper  ❯



Remembering riting, Remembering Reading

Conclusion -- My riting

This chapter (4) embraces the way in which people become literate. The author interviewed a wide variety of people with wildly diverse literacy experiences, and interestingly, many of those interviewed reflected that early writing experiences involved "feelings of loneliness, secrecy and resistance" (p. 94). The focus in this essay is on reading, but also on writing; what a person takes from this essay is that there are many ways to influence a child to begin writing, and it usually is launched from the reading experience. Yes, I write like I talk, but that is because I haven't really put my nose to the grindstone of learning what goes into a well-written essay or article. How do you influence an adult to become adept at writing well? It has to come not just from the heart, but also from the soul and the…

Works Cited

Brandt, Deborah. "Literacy in American Lives: Living and Learning in a Sea of Change." In

Literacy and Learning: Reflections on Writing, Reading, and Society. San Francisco:

Jossey-Bass, 2009.

Brandt, Deborah. "Remembering Writing, Remembering Reading," in Literacy and Learning:

School Would Involve Knowing How
Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 26351389
Read Full Paper  ❯

I said to my friend that it was not so much what happened on 9/11. What concerned me more was the world we would wake up in on Sept 12, 2001. Certainly, our country and the world will never be the same. This gave a different focus to my military career in the hopes of making sure that a 9/11 event would never happen again. With modern war, the home front is as important as overseas. We must be vigilant and studies in such an area as homeland security studies are vital. While this may not be my entire focus, it occupies a healthy portion.

In your fourth question, you ask what my experience is and/or aptitude for completing academic work at a distance. Frankly, I have many friends and family members that have received degrees online. Their main issue (especially with younger people) in dealing with the online academic…

School Inclusion With the Goal
Words: 1560 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58222173
Read Full Paper  ❯

The students will test you during these first few days. Without steadfast rules and well outlined disciplinary procedures, the students will not respect you.

In order to create a positive atmosphere of expectations, procedures and routines, it is also important to clearly outline to the class what is expected of them. However, in order to empower the classroom students, one beneficial strategy is to allow the students to help develop the classroom rules, procedures and expectations. y bringing the group together and making the classroom environment one in which they assisted in creating, the students will be more likely to both respect it and work with it.

Although there are numerous steps a teacher must take to create a successful learning environment in a full-inclusion classroom, taking firm and clear actions the first days of school are the most important. The purpose is to let the students know what the…

Bibliography:

Gore, M.C. (2003): Successful Inclusion Strategies for Secondary and Middle School Teachers: Keys to Help Struggling Learners Access the Curriculum. SAGE Publications.

Hardmand, Michael L. (2007): Human Exceptionality: School, Community and Family. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Male, Mary. (2002): Technology for Inclusion: Meeting the Special Needs of All Students. Allyn & Bacon, Inc.

Nowicki, Stephen and Marshall P. Duke. (1992): Helping the Child Who Doesn't Fit in. Peachtree Publishers.

School Teacher and College Professors
Words: 878 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65330802
Read Full Paper  ❯

Teaching at the university level and at the grade school level can be vastly different. Institutional differences account for the largest part of the disparities between these ostensibly similar careers, but methodological differences also exist. Teaching is considered the primary focus of the grade school teacher's career, whereas university professors are often academic scholars rather than educators and teaching for such people is far less important than academic research.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in four Americans are enrolled in educational institutions. Education is the largest industry in the country, accounting for nearly 12 million jobs. Most of these people teach at the grade school level. Teaching is considered a trade rather than a profession: teachers are usually unionized. Teaching positions constitute almost half of all educational services jobs and require at least a bachelor's degree. Most school districts give their employees incentives to pursue further education;…

Howard Gardner; Reflections on multiple intelligences: myths and messages. Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 77, 1995 help students delve more deeply into subjects introduced in elementary school. Middle and secondary school teachers specialize in a specific academic subject, such as English, mathematics, or history, or a vocational area, such as automobile mechanics, business education, or computer repair. Some supervise extracurricular activities after school and help students deal with academic problems and choose courses, colleges, and careers.

Special education teachers work with students - from toddlers to those in their early 20s - who have a variety of learning and physical disabilities. Most special education teachers are found at the elementary school level. Using the general education curriculum, special education teachers modify instruction to meet a student's special needs. They also help special education students develop emotionally, be comfortable in social situations, and be aware of socially acceptable behavior.

Postsecondary teachers, or faculty as they are usually called, generally are organized into departments or divisions, based on subject or field. They teach and advise college students and perform a significant part of our Nation's research. They also consult with government, business, nonprofit, and community organizations. They prepare lectures, exercises, and laboratory experiments; grade exams and papers; and advise and work with students individually. Postsecondary teachers keep abreast of developments in their field by reading current literature, talking with colleagues and businesses, and participating in professional conferences. They also do their own research to expand knowledge in their field, often publishing their findings in scholarly journals, books, and electronic media..

School of Arts and Architecture at UCLA
Words: 515 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 40196125
Read Full Paper  ❯

UCLA ART

One of my central reasons for wishing to study art at UCLA is creative and imaginative exploration. I have always been fascinated by all aspects of art, including art theory as well as the technical side and processes of art itself. These two areas, art theory and art practice, and the interaction between them constitutes the fulcrum around which my fascination with art revolves.

I view the theoretical aspect of art as essentially an exploration of the world around us, as well as the way we relate to this world from various perspectives. These perspectives include our psychological, sociological and spiritual relationship with the world which is mirrored in the various theories of art.

I am particularly interested in the Surrealistic school of thought and art. As Andre reton, the founder of the Surrealism stated "The admirable thing about the fantastic is that it is no longer the…

Bibliography

Chipp, H (1968) Theories of Modern Art. London. University of California Press.

Implementing of School Uniform Policies
Words: 1884 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72323029
Read Full Paper  ❯

School Uniforms

Perhaps the biggest debate of public education over the past decade besides school vouchers has been the debate over whether or not it is legal to require students to wear a uniform to school. Increased crime, gang violence, poor academic performance in public schools has sparked the movement towards mandatory school uniforms. hile school uniforms may seem the perfect solution to the problem, to some its as good as putting a band-aid on a three-inch deep wound. There are many arguments for and against school uniforms in public schools; the main concern has to do with the legality of making uniforms compulsory for public school students. The focus of this paper will be to discuss the issues presented by those both for and against school uniforms. Additionally, the legality of such a policy if implemented will also be presented. Finally, facts and figures on those schools that have…

Works Cited

Brunsma, David and Kerry A. Rockquemore. "The Effects of Student Uniforms on Attendance, Behavior Problems, Substance Use, and Academic Achievement." 92(1): 53-62. The Journal of Educational Research (1998).

Court Orders School to Enroll Honors Student Who Protested Mandatory Uniform Policy. Retrieved on November 17, 2002 from web site  http://www.aclu.org/StudentsRights/StudentsRights.cfm?ID=8077&c=156 

Emert Suggests Mandatory School Uniforms. Retrieved on November 16, 2002 from web site  http://www.morningsun.net/stories/092099/kan_0920990017.shtml 

Holmquist, Micah. "Uniformed Public Schools." Retrieved on November 15, 2002 from web site  http://www.stormpages.com/micahth/youth/su.html

Report on a School Visit
Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90496942
Read Full Paper  ❯

School Visit

This report is about my visit to the Roberto Clemente Middle School in Paterson, New Jersey. The visit was conducted on April 4th, in the afternoon. It was rainy. Paterson is a densely-populated urban area, and the school is in an urban neighborhood.

The visit was conducted by Dr. Goldman, who indicated that there was some issue that day where the students were scheduled to take a district test called Parcc but the system was down so that test had to be rescheduled.

This school caters to an ethnically diverse community. Dr. Goldman estimated that around 90% of the students speak another language at home, and use English mostly for school. The students are provided with bilingual classes in some case. The area is underprivileged, and most of the students receive a school lunch and breakfast. The school also provides what was termed "full service" for around 75…

Effective Discipline for Children
Words: 4828 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 48897121
Read Full Paper  ❯

Discipline for Children

Understanding effective parental discipline, defined as social projection of parents' concepts onto their children, their impact and hence its development in the children's mind, comes under a number of mechanisms and paradigms of research literature. They range from learning theories, morality theories, and parental styles of social delivery to socio cultural cum environmental approach (Halpenny, et al., 2010).

According to Clinton and Sibcy (2006), it is deemed that children are emotionally sensitive parts of the society who need parents, care, leadership, love and nurturing from someone whose primary duty is to take care of the child. According to the authors, it is possible that some decisions undertaken by the guardians in the name of love may result into deteriorative outcomes detested by the children and may form a bad effect on their lives. Following is a table (p. 6) extracted from Clinton and Sibcy defining different traits…

Wissow, L.S. (2001) 'Ethnicity, income and parenting contexts of physical punishment in a national sample of families with young children', Child Maltreatment, Vol. 6, pp. 118-29.

Woodward, L.J. And Fergusson, D.M. (2002) 'Parent, child and contextual predictors of childhood physical punishment', Infant and Child Development, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 213-36.

Wolfner, G.D. And Gelles, R.J. (1993) 'A Profile of Violence towards Children: A National Study', Child Abuse and Neglect, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 197-212.

Prestigious Leadership Program School Every Individual Is
Words: 743 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60170468
Read Full Paper  ❯

Prestigious Leadership Program School

Every individual is influenced by core values that enable him or her to successfully extract meaning and significance from life. A number of my own specific achievements are directly related to attributes I have cultivated in response to the values that are important to me. These attributes are the defining points of my character and have consistently influenced my approach to and success in dealing with life itself. By nature I am analytical, disciplined and responsible, and these strengths have consistently allowed me to overcome obstacles and achieve my goals.

My ability to utilize logic and reason to analyze situations has played a significant part in my academic achievement, and allowed me to succeed in subjects in which others might necessarily not. I have always had the propensity to search for causes in relationship to determine the effects they produce. More importantly, I learned at a…

American School Counseling Association ASCA Holds Various
Words: 1124 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43887037
Read Full Paper  ❯

American school Counseling Association (ASCA) holds various positions when it comes to professional school counselors and their conduct with students. The paper will look at three of these positions carefully and compare with my own view, opinion and expectations of what school counselors actually do.

The professional school counselor and child abuse and neglect prevention

ASCA position on school counselor and child abuse and neglect prevention is that; it is the professional school counselor's ethical, legal and moral responsibility to ensure that they report any case or suspected case of child abuse/neglect to proper authorities. They are also supposed to recognize that child abuse is not only limited to their homes but corporal punishment by school authorities is as well considered to be child abuse. ASCA is in support of any legislation which bans using corporal punishment as a tool for disciplining students in schools. The rationale behind ASCA's position…

References

American School of Counselor Association, (n.d). ASCA Position Statements.

Law in Schools
Words: 1269 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 569787
Read Full Paper  ❯

Trenton School

The environment at School1, were I am employed revolves around the many different standards of behavior and conduct. While much of this conduct is derived by local customs and habits, the imposing of law and order also significantly contributes to what is and what is not allowed. The purpose of this essay is to explore the relationship with both state and federal laws and School 1. This essay will explore the law and its applications to my school by examining key points and relevant issues related to these interactions.

Background Of Trenton School District

It is important to understand the starting point of this discussion in order to see the bigger influences that state and local governments have on the school district. According to the districts website, the mission of this school district is " All students will graduate with a vision for their futures, motivated to learn…

Metal Detectors in School
Words: 1157 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 44512113
Read Full Paper  ❯

Metal Detectors in Schools

When confronted with a frightening phenomena, people often tend only to look at the symptom, rather than the underlying cause, and in turn they end up making the problem worse, as in the case of installing metal detectors in schools in an attempt to stop violence. Although at first glance installing a metal detector might seem like an obvious choice towards making schools safer, this kind of thinking only makes the problem worse by wasting time and energy on a "solution" that ignores the larger problem, is not actually effective, and harms the very people it is meant to protect. Examining these three faults in greater detail will reveal how the use of metal detectors is born out an ignorant, careless approach to safety that harms the public while making money for a few self-interested parties.

The first problem with using metal detectors in schools is…

References

DeAngelis, K, Brent, B & Ianni, D. (2011). The hidden cost of school security. Journal of Education Finance, 36(3), 312-337.

Hartnett, S. (2008). The annihilating public policies of the prison-industrial complex; or, crime, violence, and punishment in an age of neoliberalism. Rhetoric & Public Affairs, 11(3),

492-515.

Mawson, A, Lapsley, P, Hoffman, A & Guignard, J. (2002). Preventing lethal violence in schools:

How Schools Do Well
Words: 2476 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 65776755
Read Full Paper  ❯

school is Doing well?

Performance of Schools in America has been consistently improved through presenting rationalized steps as solutions towards their betterment.

The measurement and formulation of performance and standards regarding the school was intended to take care of the problematic system of the school. The aim of the reforms was to standardize and systemize so that there is a clear picture of the schools for the public to judge the performance. The schools in America are not under the Ministry of Education although there is a department of education in the Federal State. There are fifty educational departments in the U.S. which serve around fifty two million people in more than one million schools. Among the different solutions presented, rationalized steps were the only solution used to improve the performance of schools. The concept of rationalization has a lot of features. (a) The outcome of the rubrics and standards…

Bibliography

Eisner, Elliot. "What does it mean to say a School is Doing Well?" In The Curriculum Studies Reader, by Elliot Eisner, 297-305. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Ritzer, George. "The Weberian Theory of Rationalization and the McDonaldization of Contemporary Society." In Classical Sociological Theory, by George Ritzer, 41-59. 2007.

Decisions by School Superintendents Improper Attitude and
Words: 7657 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31703614
Read Full Paper  ❯

Decisions by School Superintendents

Improper Attitude and Unprofessional Conduct of Teachers

To educate a person in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society - President Theodore oosevelt.

That teaching is at one and the same time an intellectual as well as a moral endeavor, is an idea that is well entrenched in the minds of men since centuries past. The sayings of great teachers of ancient times bear ample testimony to this premise, which continues to hold sway across nations and vastly differing civilizations over the years.

In the sense that it takes care of the general well being of young students entrusted to the care of an educational institution and ensures that they are treated fairly and accorded the respect they are due as persons, teaching is most certainly a moral activity. It is concerned with building and maintaining relationships of trust with pupils…

References

Anderson, D.S., & Biddle, B.J. (Eds.) (1991). Knowledge for Policy: Improving Education through Research. New York: The Falmer Press.

Ave, M. (2002, April 24). Jesuit High teacher fired amid misconduct claim. Retrieved December 19, 2002 at  http://www.sptimes.com/2002/04/24/TampaBay/Jesuit_High_teacher_f.shtml .

Barth, R.S. (1990). Improving schools from within. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Benson, P. (1997). All Kids Are Our Kids: What Communities Must Do To Raise Caring and Responsible Children and Adolescents. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fifth Discipline
Words: 6323 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 14443114
Read Full Paper  ❯

Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization

The following will be a review of a book known as The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization by Peter M. Senge. It is a book that describes how a company can become successful by adapting learning organization practices. In the long run the book explains that one has to learn faster than the competition in order to be the most successful.

Chapter one sees Senge introducing the reader to the ideas of learning organizations and how they are needed for one to become successful in this day and age. As the world becomes more complex and interconnected, according to Senge, businesses and organization must become more "learningful" which is something I believe in. If a business wants to top as the best they have to learn the trade or quirks pretty fast (Senge, 2006). According…

Reference"

Senge, P. (2006). The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization. Doubleday.

Round School vs A Regular
Words: 10557 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 76655571
Read Full Paper  ❯

Students in these kinds of schools do not attend school longer, but they do not have a summer break that is longer than any of the other breaks that they take during the school year.

esearch done by McMillen (2001) indicated that there were 106 schools in the state of North Carolina that operated on the year-round school calendar for third through eighth grades during the 1997-1998 school year. McMillen (2001) then conducted an analysis of the academic achievements of these students and compared them to the academic achievements of students in the same grades that attended schools where the traditional calendar was still used.

Data for the study came from a database of statewide testing in which 95% of the public schools in the state participate. In order to determine the academic achievements of the students, McMillen (2001) looked at achievement test scores and demographic information that was collected…

References. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at  http://www.ericdigests.org 

Painesville City School District. (2008). Year Round Education. Retrieved February 20, 2008, at http://www.painevillecityschools.org

Polite, V.C. (1999). Combating educational neglect in suburbia: African-American males and mathematics. In V.C. Polite & J.E. Davis (Eds.), African-American males in school and society: Practices and policies for effective education (pp. 97-107). New York: Teachers College Press.

Poplin, M., & Weeres, J. (1992). Voices from the inside: A report on schooling from inside the classroom. Claremont, CA: Claremont Graduate School, Institute for Education in Transformation.

Pothering, S.L. (1998). The decision-making processes of higher education undergraduate academic program development in a public liberal arts institution. (Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Caroline, 1998). UMI Dissertation Services.

Co-Curricular Activities High School Can
Words: 4210 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 5312215
Read Full Paper  ❯

2007)." The authors also explain that there is a great deal of interest in the concept of school engagement because it is believed to be influenced by environmental changes (Fredricks et al., 2004; Dotterer et al. 2007). As a result of racial and ethnic achievement gaps, the study of school engagement amongst students of color is essential to closing these gaps. Previous research uncovered a pattern of underachievement in African-American students who have lower grades and receive less education than non-Hispanic White students (Dotterer et al. 2007).

According to Jimerson et al. (2003) there are three dimensions of school engagement: affective, behavioral, and cognitive. The affective dimension is associated with an emotional connection to school and the sense of belonging that students have with their school. Additionally this dimension of school engagement is often referred to as school attachment (Johnson et al., 2001). The affective dimension of school engagement "reflects…

References

Dotterer a.M. Susan M. McHale Ann C. Crouter. (2007) Implications of Out-of-School Activities for School Engagement in African-American Adolescents. J Youth Adolescence (2007) 36:391 -- 401

Dworkin, J.B., Larson, R., & Hansen, D. (2003). Adolescents' accounts of growth experiences in youth activities. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 32, 17-26.

Feldman, Amy F.; Matjasko, Jennifer L. (2005) the Role of School-Based Extracurricular Activities in Adolescent Development: A Comprehensive Review and Future Directions Review of Educational Research v. 75 no. 2 p. 159-210

Fredricks J, Blumenfeld P, Paris a (2004) School engagement: Potential of the concept, state of the evidence. Rev Educ Res 74:59 -- 109

Catholic High School Choosing the Education Which
Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37903224
Read Full Paper  ❯

Catholic High School

Choosing the education which will best serve our children is one of the most difficult decisions a parent can make. There is a very real possibility that choosing the wrong institution will destroy or at the very least seriously hinder the future success of your child. Choosing a good school will allow your child to receive a better education, to develop better socially and avoid some of the serious pitfalls which are more often encountered in lesser schools, and will open the doors for future academic successes and subsequent career success as your children progress into adulthood. Private schools have proven statistically to provide a higher quality of education in addition to a pantheon of other benefits. A private Catholic school education provides students with academic, social, and religious benefits which no other school can promise.

Academically, a private education is vastly superior to the education proffered…

Violence in the Public Schools Teen Violence
Words: 1762 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7002212
Read Full Paper  ❯

violence in the public schools. Teen violence in general has become a major concern in America today. One of the reasons for the issue being so prevalent is the number of school shootings in the last few years, especially the shooting at Columbine High in Littleton, Colorado. hile the welfare of young people is always of concern, much of the fear being generated at the present time is excessive. For one thing, teen violence is not the new phenomenon many people seem to think it is, and an analysis of our history shows that violence in the schools has always been a problem and that in fact it is diminished at the present time. In truth, though, any school violence is too much, and ways of eliminating it and protecting students in school must be found. Several "solutions" to the problem have been offered.

One such recommendation is school uniforms,…

Works Cited

Access Control & Security Systems Integration Facility Systems Staff. "Devising an effective school security plan." Access Control & Security Systems Integration (1 July 2000).

Bowman, Darcia Harris. "Federal Study Stresses Warning Signs of School Violence."

Education Week 21(15)(12 Dec 2001), 12.

Clinton, Bill. "Memorandum on the School Uniforms Manual." Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents (March 4, 1996), 368-369.

Raphael's School of Athens Biography
Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66647321
Read Full Paper  ❯

Beginning with the major arch of the Stanze that frames the entire piece, there recedes a series of concentric circles that focus down to the archway that frames the two central figures. This can be seen as a nearly literal rippling effect of the wisdom of these two great thinkers off into space, and into the mind of the viewer. Working from largest to smallest, we can see that the pattern is ultimately infinite since it ends with the focal point discussed in the previous paragraph. This seems to reflect the philosophy that the more focused a philosophy comes, and the finite the topics, the closer it gets to circling back again into the infinite.

The integration of a dialectic of ideas is achieved through an intricate working of visual lines. The strong diagonals of the heads of the two statues and the heads of the two major figures creates…

Sustainability Classifications in Engineering Discipline
Words: 345 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76888032
Read Full Paper  ❯

Another concept that arises in the discourse on sustainability is what responsibility one generation has for the next in terms of caring for the environment and preventing problems like pollution or climate change. Thus, there are ecological, economic, and social issues as well as political problems at stake. The author also points out the legal and institutional issues involved in sustainability discourse as well as the technological implications.

Sustainability is at once a theoretical and practical concept. Both abstract and concrete, sustainability has different implications depending on the field of application. Therefore, an engineer will conceive of sustainability differently from an attorney or a consumer. The author outlines the various ideological underpinnings of sustainability discourse and presents a comprehensive model for a systems approach to sustainability science. Sustainability represents the intersection between science, philosophy, economics, ethics, and politics. Therefore, sustainability must be understood as a multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary issue.

eference…

Reference

Hansa, a.M. (2010). Sustainability classifications in engineering: discipline and approach. International Journal of Sustainable Engineering, 3:4, 258-276, First published on: 14 September 2010.

Fashion of School Students Starts
Words: 1213 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29731889
Read Full Paper  ❯

(And Now For Something Completely Different)

It has rightly been said that 'miracles transcend the body' since they prove that the body does not exist where it is at. Since the body physically has no problems by reforming our minds we are able to transcend the laws of the body. The proper use of mind can actually perform anything in the material world. eally God did not create this world. The laws of this world, the principles of gravity, death, sickness, and nutrition all the principles are actually are formulated by men. They are considered as the outcome of the ego mind. We accord priority to the laws as a result of our allegiance to the ego. Simply therefore, just by deterring from such allegiance by means of strong resolute will it is possible to transcend all those laws. Jesus therefore said that faith can move mountains. (The Fifty Miracle…

References

And Now For Something Completely Different. 25 October, 2004. Retrieved at http://www.mirrorofjustice.com/mirrorofjustice/2004/10/and_now_for_som.html. Accessed 24 September, 2005

Interview with Michelle, Pfeiffer: Dangerous Minds. Retrieved at  http://desires.com/1.6/Perf/Pfeifer/pfeif.html . Accessed 24 September, 2005

Special Thanks to God. Retrieved at  http://www.heartsandminds.org/God.htm . Accessed 24 September, 2005

Wapnick, Kenneth. The Fifty Miracle Principles of a Course in Miracles. Retrieved at  http://www.miraclestudies.net/50P_17.html . Accessed 24 September, 2005

Working While Going to School
Words: 795 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 99743433
Read Full Paper  ❯



Students have to worry about student loans, too. Another writer says, "One out of five people who borrow money for their education will drop out in debt, but with no degree" (Draut). If they are smart enough to work while they're still in school, they may be able to save some money to put toward student loans in the future, and they may build up enough stamina to make sure they're not one of those students who racks up student loans and then leaves school without a degree.

Finally, there's another reason to look at working during school. Studies show that it makes you a better student. Another writer says, "Studies show that students who work 10 to 12 hours a week get better grades -- the discipline is good for them. But if you work more than 15 hours a week while in school, you may have a few…

References

Draut, Tamara. "Building the Grand Alliance: Collaboration between Low- and Middle-Income People Is One of the Keys to Rebuilding the Broken American Dream." Sojourners Magazine Feb. 2007: 12+.

"Lowering Boom on High Cost of Higher Education; Going to College without Going Broke a Challenge." The Washington Times 8 Apr. 2007: A01.

Schlack, Lawrence B. "Going to College Is Not Always the Best Choice." School Administrator Mar. 2007: 52.

Shatkin, Jess P. "Transition to College: Separation and Change for Parents and Students." New York University. 2010. 25 Feb. 2010.

Working in a High-Needs School
Words: 490 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 58855569
Read Full Paper  ❯

I know that I cannot give all of my students the advantages of a stable, high-income, two-parent home, a safe neighborhood, and parental involvement. If educators could do that, then there would not be an education crises in this country. However, I can work to make sure that all children receive the same real opportunities in their educational environment. This means going beyond giving children theoretical access to the same opportunities, and making sure that high-needs children have the same real access to resources and opportunities. If I can play a role in bringing educational equality to disadvantaged children, then I think that I can help make a meaningful difference in the lives of disadvantaged children. Just days ago, the United States experienced an inauguration that was historically significant because a poor, African-American child of a single mother attained the highest office in our nation. Obama would not be President…

High School Students Are Receiving Poor Education
Words: 1156 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43363172
Read Full Paper  ❯

high school students are receiving poor education as regards financial literacy (e.g. NAEP, 1979). Mandell (1997), for instance, reports that high school students have an average score of 57% in terms of money management, savings and investment, spending and other areas of income. HS graduates, in other words, have weak financial literacy. Adults also, generally, are almost totally illiterate regarding retirement and investment decision-making. A study of 552 adult females found that 56% were ignorant about the fundamentals of investing (Chen & Volpe, 1998).

A further study found that most Americans fail to save for retirement or fail to save for emergencies possessing a false confidence about financial security of their future (ibid.). About 71% of all workers and 81% of retirees in the study scored 60% or less in knowledge of financial matters. In their same review, Chen and Volpe (1998) showed that the Institute of Certified Financial Planners…

References

Babbie, E. (1989). The Practice of Social Research. 5th edition. Belmont CA: Wadsworth

Chen, H. & Volpe RP (1998) An analysis of personal financial literacy among college students, Financial Services review, 7, 107-128

Creswell, J. (2003). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.

Danes, SM & Hira, TK (1987). Money management knowledge of college students, Journal of Student Fin. Aid, 17, 4-16

Indian Education Boarding Schools Indian Boarding Schools Were
Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83898286
Read Full Paper  ❯

Indian Education/Boarding Schools

Indian boarding schools were designed to assimilate Native American children into the greater American (white) culture. Students at the schools suffered from poor diet, illness and harsh discipline. As a result of these deficiencies, and the high cost of running the boarding schools, they began to disappear from the American landscape in the 1930s.

Indian education from the 1880s to the 1920s was designed to assimilate the American Indian population into the greater American society. This was accomplished by placing Native American Indian children into institutions where the traditional ways of Indian society were replaced by government-sanctioned behaviors and beliefs. Native American children were removed from their families, and enrolled in government-run boarding schools.

Boarding schools first became vogue prior to the American Civil ar. During this time, idealistic reformers put forth the idea that Indians could become "civilized" with the proper education and treatment. Prior to…

Works Cited

Marr, Carolyn J. Assimilation Through Education: Indian Boarding Schools in the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections. 19 October 2002.  http://content.lib.washington.edu/aipnw/marr/biblio.html 

Kelley, Matt. The Associated Press. American Indian boarding schools: 'That hurt never goes away'. Wednesday, April 28, 1999. 19 October 2002. http://www.canoe.ca/CNEWSFeatures9904/28_indians.html

Classical School vs Positivist School
Words: 951 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74289807
Read Full Paper  ❯

Classical vs. Positivist School of Criminology:

Two Clashing Views of the Human, Criminal Animal

Although 18th century classical views of criminology should not be conflated with later, modern notions of classical psychological conditioning like Pavlov's dog being trained to salivate at the sound of a bell, there are certain similarities between the two schools of thought and even some of the methods used in classical criminology to reorient criminals back into society. First and foremost, later forms of classical conditioning and the early classical school of criminality both stressed the ability, through repeated positive reinforcement of socially desirable traits and negative enforcement regarding antisocial traits deemed criminal by society. (Adler, et. al, 2004) For instance, Jeremy Bentham's vision of a 'panopticon' like prison in classical criminology suggested a prison in which individuals were constantly watched, and thus were forced to monitor and reform their behavior accordingly. Eventually, the reinforcement of…

Works Cited

Adler, Freda, et al. (2004) Criminology and the Criminal Justice System. Fifth Edition. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Barak, Gregg. Integrating Criminologies. Prepared by Paul Leighton Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1997.

Bentham, Jeremy. (1861). Utilitarianism.

Foucault, Michel. (1977) Discipline and Punishment. New York: Vintage Books.

Development Guidance for a School or a Community Agency
Words: 2098 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 67883423
Read Full Paper  ❯

Guidance and Counseling Program for a school or a community Agency

Comprehensive School Counseling Program Guide of the - Public School

Guidance and counseling has been included as a professional course by the Higher Education Commission document publicized in 2010. The teachers must have a basic know how about the school guidance and counseling techniques in order to tackle the personal and social issues which students face within the classroom as per Higher Education Commission (2012). Comprehensive School Counseling Program Guide of the - Public School is a brief explanation of design, application and assessment of SPS school counseling program (Dahir, 2009).

Objectives of the model:

The basic aims of this model are as follows:

Outlining school counseling and transitioning of conventional practice into transformed practice (Dahir, 2009).

Comprehending the different roles the guidance and counseling system entails for backing the students in their future goals and social challenges

This…

References

Connecticut State Department of Education (2008).Comprehensive School Counseling. Retrieved from  http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/counseling.pdf 

Dahir, C. (2009).Comprehensive School Counseling Program Guide. Working Document. Retrieved from http://www.sps.springfield.ma.us/webContent/Policies/Comprehensive%20School%20Counseling%20Program%20Guide%20&%20Appendix.pdf

Higher Education Commission (2012).Introduction to Guidance and Counseling. Retrieved from  http://www.hec.gov.pk/InsideHEC/Divisions/AECA/CurriculumRevision/Documents/GuidanceCounseling_Sept13.pdf 

Gysbers, N.C., & Henderson, P. (2001). Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Programs: A Rich History and a Bright Future. Professional School Counseling, 4 (4), 246-259. Retrieved from http://fcett.nu.edu/sites/default/files/file_file/gysbers_history.pdf

Whole School
Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77957380
Read Full Paper  ❯

school reform, also known as comprehensive school reform, has been proposed as an effective and promising means to helping even the most marginalized students succeed and thrive (McChesney, 1998). The tenets of whole school reform take into account every aspect of a school including its role in the community, its budgets and spending, its resource allocation, its infrastructure, facilities, curricula, and teachers. According to the whole school reform model, piecemeal methods fail because they do not address the underlying structural and functional issues in education. While whole school reform seems promising in theory, it fails to manifest meaningful changes in practice due to the largely privatized model that it has been built on, especially with regards to the New American Schools (NAS) system. Moreover, the whole school reform model takes years to implement properly, and fails to provide effectively for interim solutions to the most pressing and immediate problems (Fullan,…

References

Berends, M., Bodilly, S. & Kirby, S.N. (2002). Looking back over a decade. Phi Delta Kappan 84(2), 168-175.

Fullan, M. (2001). Whole school reform: problems and promises. Retrieved online:

 http://www.michaelfullan.ca/media/13396044810.pdf 

McChesney, J. (1998). Whole school reform. Retrieved online:  http://www.ericdigests.org /1999-4/reform.htm

Preventing School Failure
Words: 1059 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12692431
Read Full Paper  ❯

Shapiro (2004) stated that progress monitoring has now become a crucial element in the enhancement of pupil academic outcomes. It has been concluded that literature has evidently shown the concept of progress monitoring that can across different domains such as spelling, mathematics, composition, reading and writing (Hosp & Hosp, 2003)

Activity description and Summary

The progress monitoring program that is being designed focused more on the performance on the pupils according to the curriculum that is designed for them. This performance is basically measured and monitored across a period of time. Technically, this measurement is carried out through every three or every six terms.

The best way to ensure measurement of school wide data is through online software's that can be accessed by not only teachers but by parents as well. By making this data available on the net, it can also be accessed easily by other schools in the…

References

Brooks, V. (2002). Assessment in secondary schools (1st ed.). Buckingham [England]: Open University Press.

Hosp, M., & Hosp, J. (2003). Curriculum-Based Measurement for Reading, Spelling, and Math: How to Do It and Why. Preventing School Failure, 48(1), 10 -- 17.

Shapiro, E. (2004). Academic skills problems workbook (1st ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

Business School Undergraduate Business --
Words: 334 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45252836
Read Full Paper  ❯



I believe that most successful people in the field of biotechnology are comfortable with the language of science as well as possess an economic understanding of the implications of science. Taking the actively discussion-based class Business 1 gave me my first taste of marketing and the sense of what it like to become part of a working environment and culture. Working with motivated and creative undergrad business students encouraged me to excel, to stretch myself as a learner, and also to bring my own unique experiences from science to the classroom.

My ultimate career goal is to secure a role in a biotechnical company in a managerial or marketing capacity, whereby I hope to deploy my skills managing and communicating with people to clarify complex scientific issues so that laypeople can understand such issues, and appreciate their significance to individuals and to the…

Wind Education Inclusion Discipline the Purpose of
Words: 3474 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87666315
Read Full Paper  ❯

Wind

Education: Inclusion Discipline

The purpose of this work is to research Inclusion Discipline. Recently there has been a push throughout the nation for the placement of Special Education students in the regular classroom environments. This work will examine that which an administrator must do in making provisions of ensuring the students not only receive quality education but also to reflect that the IEPs methods utilized are promoting quality behavior in the regular classroom.

Inclusive education has faced many challenges in the classroom that is so diverse in terms of student's needs and accommodations. The Individuals with Disabilities Act was passed with the intent of protecting and integrating disabled individuals. To complicate matters the passing of the "No Child Left ehind Act" by the present administration brought with it what has the feel of a "conflict of interest" in view of the pre-existing IDEA legislation. Through the evaluation of IEP's,…

Bibliography:

Watson, Harry (1999) Southern Cultures 'Gone with the Wind' critique 19993.[Online]http://www.highbeam .com/library/doc3.asp?ctrlInfo=Round9B%3AP%4ADO C%3AP.

Susman, Tina (2001) "Brilliant Parody or Blatant Ripoff? Newsday 2001 April 17.

Goss, Fred (2001) "The Wind Done Gone" (2001 Sep 9)

"Gone With the Wind" (1998) Memphis Flyer

Internet Privacy for High School Students
Words: 12595 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31900441
Read Full Paper  ❯

Internet Privacy for High School Students

The unrestrained stream of information is conceived necessary for democracies and market-based economies. The capability of the Internet to make available the vast quantity of information to practically everyone, irrespective of their locations thus entails large benefits. The Internet provides access to the greatest libraries of the world to the students even in the smallest towns and permit the medical specialists to analyze the patients situated about thousands of miles away. The attribute of interactivity of the Internet fosters communication and personal and political expression. The Internet also assists to make the economies progress as it enhances the ease, speed and cost effectiveness with regard to the collection, compilation and delivery around the world to the multiple extent. The electronic commerce will decline the business costs as companies are able to take the benefits of enhanced access to customers, products and suppliers worldwide along…

References

Baskin, Joy Surratt; Surratt, Jim. "Student Privacy Rights and Wrongs on the Web" School Administrator. Vol: 35; No: 2; pp: 102, 114-116

Beth Givens, (February 2000) "Privacy Expectations in a High Tech World" Computer and High Technology Law Journal. Retrieved from  http://www.privacyrights.org/ar/expect.htm  Accessed on 14 April, 2005

'Board Policy with Guidelines Date Subject: Student Technology Acceptable Use Policy" (17 July, 2001) North Sanpete School District Policy. Number V-30. Retrieved from http://www.nsanpete.k12.ut.us/~nshs/nslibrary/accuse.html Accessed on 14 April, 2005

Brooks-Young, Susan. (November-December, 2000) "Internet usage update" Today's Catholic Teacher. Vol: 17: No: 2; pp: 53-56

Connecting Theory and Meaning of Disability Studies in Schools
Words: 3635 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60588925
Read Full Paper  ❯

Connecting Theory and Meaning of Disability Studies in Schools

The connecting theory application in the system of basic education has contributed to the development and establishment of a trans-disciplinary scientific strategized framework. This framework bases on the specified reverence for a considerable orientation in long-term and the engagement of decision makers in the education system on its application. The connecting theory involves work that cuts across education disciplines. This is with the aim of exposing the aspects perceived to be of outdated assumptions in the education system. This happens with their respective enrichment in the technological and social practice. The theory constitutes well-strategized research with knowledge meant for informing a scientific framework designated. This is to enable direct transformation towards the education system future with worldview fit (Fenton-Smith, & Stillwell, 2011).

The concrete developed strategic objectives aim at addressing the advancements with accuracy in understanding the aspect of science. This…

References

Albrecht, G.L. (2003). Handbook of disability studies. Thousand Oaks, Calif. [u.a.: Sage.

Dan Goodley & Michele Moore. (2010). Doing Disability Research: Activist lives and the academy. Retrieved from:  http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cdso20 

Danforth, S. (2006). Vital questions facing disability studies in education. New York: Lang.

Fenton-Smith, B., & Stillwell, C. (2011). Reading Discussion Groups for Teachers:

Cultural Cues of Eastern and Western Schools in Today's World
Words: 1756 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14860448
Read Full Paper  ❯

Education in the East and West

The difference between education in the East and the West is primarily a difference in culture. Today, cultural differences are less pronounced than they were a century ago. Globalized society has seen cultures meld and melt into one another, so that in many senses the East resembles the West in more ways than one (Igarashi). However, deeply rooted cultural cues still represent a fundamental reason for existing educational differences between the East and the West. This paper will describe these differences and show why they exist.

Medieval Guilds were important to production standards in the time of the Renaissance. For example, "in places where guilds were strong, they exercised strict oversight over training" (Hansen). In fact, the education and apprenticeship of the Renaissance was a highly skilled exercise that began at the youngest age and often required more than a decade of training.

Western…

Li, Jin. Cultural Foundations of Learning: East and West. UK: Cambridge, 2012.

Print.

Li's book is very helpful in understanding the differences between Eastern and Western education: it highlights cultural influences in the West, from the Greeks, and in the East, from Confucius and Buddha, etc. It looks at how religion and science have both played a part in where East and West are educationally speaking.

Race Schools Queens New York Is
Words: 2539 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 68375028
Read Full Paper  ❯

If students are misbehaving, they are not engaged in their lessons. Behavior management is, unfortunately, a priority focus at Springfield Gardens, to the detriment of instruction. This is the point that the three interviewees continued to stress. None of them blamed the teachers for failing to engage students; the fault, as they see it, lies squarely with the students whose families apparently do not place a high value on education. The students, as Gordon, Benton and Johnson see it, are products of the culture in which their parents live.

The three frequently compared and contrasted the students of today with students of generations past. Students in "the good old days" did not misbehave the way students do "these days." That point was made clear, particularly in interviews with Benton and Gordon. Benton recalled a childhood outside the United States where school, he implied, was much more rigorous. It would appear…

References

Bali, V.A., & Alvarez, R.M. (2003). Schools and educational outcomes: What causes the "race gap" in student test scores? Social Science Quarterly 84 (3)

Biddle, R. (March 7, 2011). The condemnation of black children to dropout factories must end. Dropout Nation. Retrieved from  http://dropoutnation.net/2011/03/07/condemnation-black-children/ 

Lewis, a.E. (2001). There is no race in the schoolyard: Color-blind ideology in an (almost)

all-white school. American Educational Research Journal 38 (4), 781-811.

Attendance Policy in an Alternative School
Words: 8552 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1590486
Read Full Paper  ❯

Program Attendance Policy Proposal and Analysis

As we are nearing the end of the third school year of the P.A.S.S. program it is beneficial to evaluate the standards and practices which have been set forth through the past three years and determine the efficacy of them. In accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for Elementary and secondary education school principals (January 2001), data driven assessment of the policies is due. The need for implementation of best practices, be they new or accepted older models is especially great given the proven success of the P.A.S.S. program which has resulted in the proposal for expansion of enrolment and services to meet a greater demand within the local district.

The establishment of best practices for the future is the goal of the current assessment. Since its inception the P.A.S.S. program has used a program completion option strategy with at-risk students attending classes at Howell…

References

ERIC Raising School Attendance. Education Digest, Feb2002, 67.6, pgs.54-57.

ERIC Urban Policies and Programs To Reduce Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 129.

ERIC Jay DeKalb Student Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 125.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management and Linn-Benton Education Service

Leadership in International Schools
Words: 29649 Length: 108 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20990082
Read Full Paper  ❯

Leadeship Skills Impact Intenational Education

CHALLENGES OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

Pactical Cicumstances of Intenational schools

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION

What is Effective Leadeship fo Today's Schools?

Challenges of Intecultual Communication

Challenges of Diffeing Cultual Values

Impotance of the Team

Leadeship Style

LEADERSHIP THEORIES

Cuent Leadeship Reseach

Tansfomational Leadeship

Skills-Authoity

Contingency Theoies

APPLYING LEADERSHIP IN AN INTERNATIONAL SETTING

Wagne's "Buy-in" vs. Owneship

Undestanding the Ugent Need fo Change

Reseach confims what teaches, students, paents and supeintendents have long known: the individual school is the key unit fo educational impovement, and within the school the pincipal has a stong influence upon the natue of the school, the conditions unde which students lean, and upon what and how much they lean. Despite this ageement about the cental ole of the pincipal, thee is little eseach concening the chaacteistics of pincipals associated with effective leadeship and with pupil accomplishment, and even less insight…

reference:

http://mason.gmu.edu/~lshafer/schoolsetting.html].

Allen, K.E., Bordas, J., Robinson Hickman, G., Matusek, L.R., & Whitmire, K.J. (1998). Leadership in the twenty-first century. Rethinking Leadership Working Papers. Academy of Leadership Press. http://www.academy.umd.edu/scholarship/casl/klspdocs/21stcen.html

Bennis, W.G. (1997). "The secrets of great groups." Leader to Leader, No.3. The Peter F. Drucker Foundation for Nonprofit Management. http://www.pfdf.org/leaderbooks/L2L/winter97/bennis.html

Crowther, F., Kaagan, S., et. al. (2002). Developing Teacher Leaders. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.

Why Teacher Discipline is Necessary
Words: 1546 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 15816666
Read Full Paper  ❯

Teacher Employment/Discipline Scenario
Introduction
Paul Swanson has been advised that he needs to take anger management to control his temper. He has declined and now a worst possible scenario has occurred: the teacher has assaulted a student. Though an unfortunate chain reaction of events precipitated the assault, it is possible that the whole thing could have been avoided had Mr. Swanson handled himself with more propriety. The student Alicia Fernandez is not without fault and conducted herself in a manner unsuitable for a student in this school and her provocative behavior should not go unaddressed. However, Mr. Swanson should have the self-possession required of a tenured teacher to deal with provocative behavior from students in a more dignified manner. This paper will discuss the immediate action that should be taken, any reporting requirements that have been triggered, personnel policies that apply, Illinois laws that apply to the situation, and recommendations…

God in School
Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 67522205
Read Full Paper  ❯

eligion Colonial Education

eligion as a Driving Force

The impact of religion on the human psyche is both important and worthy of investigation. The spiritual aspects that drive the human soul to its desires is a powerful, but often ignored power that can be used to help create a learning environment and teach us about the true capacity of the human mind. The importance of religion and the freedom to pursue one's own spiritual path is embedded in the values of this country as noted in the Bill of ights of the United States Constitution. This essay will explore how this religious freedom has impacted higher education in the history of this nation, and how these forces are still impacting the environment today.

The colonial movement away from England was revolutionary in many ways. Freedom loving individuals who had the courage to step away from harmful circumstances and create a…

References

Axtell, J. (1976). The school upon a hill: Education and society in colonial New England. Norton.

Bonomi, P.U. (2003). Under the cope of heaven: Religion, society, and politics in Colonial America. Oxford University Press.

Stout, H.S. (1977). Religion, communications, and the ideological origins of the American revolution. The William and Mary Quarterly: A Magazine of Early American History, 519-541.

Wisniewski, M. (2011). Religion, and controversy, always part of U.S. education. Reuters, 9 Jun 2011. Retrieved from  http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/06/09/us-usa-religion-schools-idUSTRE75829R20110609

Vocational Courses in High School
Words: 7142 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 6405426
Read Full Paper  ❯

(Stasz, and Bodilly, 2004)

In the press release by Mike Bowler and David Thomas (2005), High School Students Using Dual Enrollment Programs to Earn College Credits, New eports Say. According to this report, the federal budget proposes to increase access to "dual enrollment" programs for at-risk students. Out of the approximately 2,050 institutions with dual enrollment programs, almost 110 institutions, or 5% (about 2% of all institutions) offered dual enrollment programs specifically aimed toward high school students "at risk" for failing academically. Two new reports by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics also confirm that high school students currently take advantage of programs to earn college credits. The High School Initiative, designed to help prepare high school students to graduate with skills needed to succeed, permits states and districts to utilize funding for:

individual performance plans, dropout prevention efforts, demanding vocational and technical courses, college awareness…

References www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Ahola+Sakari%22Ahola, Sakari & www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Kivela+Suvi%22Kivela, Suvi. (2007). "Education Is Important, but..." Young People outside o Schooling and the Finnish Policy of "Education Guarantee." Routledge. Retrieved March 5, 2008, at  http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&eric_viewStyle=listERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=basic  & RICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&pageSize=10&eric_displayNtriever=false&eric_dis ayStartCount=11&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b801cf28f&accno=EJ 73348&_nfls=false

Bowler, Mike & Thomas. David. (2005). "High School Students Using Dual Enrollment Programs to Earn College Credits, New Reports Say." Retrieved March 5, 2008, at  http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2005/04/04062005a.html  www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Cavanagh+Sean%22Cavanagh, Sean. (2006). Perkins Bill is Approved by Congress; Editorial Projects in Education. RetrievedMarch 5, 2008, from:  http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&eric_viewStylelist&EICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=bas  & ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&pageSize=10&eric_displayNtriever=false&eric_ isplayStartCount=11&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b8015ea43&accn =EJ748517&_nfls=false www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020969480

Chang, E.S., Chen, C., Greenberger, E., Dooley, D., & Heckhausen, J. (2006). What Do They Want in Life?: The Life Goals of a Multi-Ethnic, Multi-Generational Sample of High School Seniors. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 35(3), 321+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020969480  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5024401870

Christle, C.A., Jolivette, K., & Michael, N.C. (2007). School Characteristics Related to High School Dropout Rates. Remedial and Special Education, 28(6), 325+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5024401870  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023042611

Dymond, S.K., Renzaglia, a., & Chun, E. (2007). Elements of Effective High School Service Learning Programs That Include Students with and without Disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 28(4), 227+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023042611  www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Gentry+Marcia%22Gentry, Marcia; www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Peters+Scott+J.%22Peters, Scott J.; www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Mann+Rebecca+L.%22Mann, Rebecca L. (2007). Differences between General and Talented Students' Perceptions of Their Career and Technical Education Experiences Compared to Their Traditional High School Experiences. Prufrock Press Inc. Retrieved March 5, 2008, at  http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=keyword&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b801cbe46&accno=EJ773183&_nfls=false  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002014218

Ethnomethodology Is a Discipline That Studies the
Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1545787
Read Full Paper  ❯

Ethnomethodology is a discipline that studies the conduct of individuals within a particular society and the methods that these individuals use to actualize and accomplish their conduct / patterns of daily life in order to draw conclusions about that particular society or about a specific population within that society. In this case, inquiry would be focused on social contractions that adolescents experience and the consequences of such contradictions in their development.

The methods of study that I would utilize would be the following: I would limit my inquiry to a specific age (for instance, adolescents between 14 and 18); to a specific population (for instance, adolescents of second-generation Chinese who are living in America); to a certain area of America; and to a distinct socio-economic segment (for instance well -- educated, suburbia). Since ethnomethodological inquiry can be potentially huge, I would also employ other exclusionary factors such as ascertaining that…

Reference

Garfinkel, H. (2002) Ethnomethodology's program. NY: Rowman & Littlefield