Scientist Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Stem Cells and Umbilical Cords

Words: 4604 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68647678

Scientists have been aware of the existence of these stem cells for many years but have only recently realized the potential medical applications of the cells. More than a decade ago, scientists discovered that if the normal connections between the early cellular progeny of the fertilized egg were disrupted, the cells would fall apart into a single cell progeny that could be maintained in a culture. These dissociated cells, otherwise known as embryonic stem cell lines, continue to divide in culture, producing large numbers of cells at a fast pace. However, these early embryonic cells would lose the coordinated activity.

Scientists quickly discovered that these cells retain the ability to generate a great number of mature cell types in culture if they are provided with appropriate molecular signals (Reaves, 2001). Scientists have made significant progress in discovering these signals and are still working on it. hile it is a difficult…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Colino, Stacey. (2001). Making Sense of Stem Cells. Lifetime.

Prescott, Bonnie. (2001). Animal Study Find Embryonic Stem Cells Can Repair Heart Muscle. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Reaves, Jessica. (2002). The Great Debate Over Stem Cell Research. Time Magazine.

Recer, Paul. (2002). Study says stem cells have fewer mutations than previously thought. AP Online.
View Full Essay

Emerging Biotechnologies Censoring Science

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26452729

Censoring Science & Ethics

Here are my answers to the questions on the Values Exchange. I assume censoring is bad. I tried to answer the questions in a way like the others did. Then I changed the essay to make it sound why the issue should be considered in a better way. The questions are provided and then the answers are in RED. I guess, if you have to post them, you can use this as a guide. The essay can then be cut and pasted into another file and used that way. Hope this is what you want.

Emerging Biotechnologies: Censoring Science

I disagree with censoring science.

REACTIONS:

Why does this matter?

Because the issue is about whether science works the way it should.

IDEAL: What ideal most important?

Giving scientists and the way science is done the chance to work properly.

How confident? Just a little.

Why ideal…… [Read More]

My belief is that censoring science is never a good thing. In using the Values Exchange, people have the chance to offer their opinions and suggestions. However, in most instances the amount of information that is offered is limited and seems very similar to others. It appears that it would be better if people were free to look more deeply into the topic. I looked through a number of articles and found a lot of additional information that leads me to believe that it is important for science and scientists to be ethical and open about what they are doing.

THE ISSUES ARE BROADER: Some of the issues that I noticed that are not well reflected in the Values Exchange have to do with how broad this topic can be. The ethical issues in the biological and health sciences of the past are not the same as those we face now. The issue of whether there should be a release of detailed technical information in adapting the H5N1 virus into a mutant strain seems troubling but somewhat distant from most people's real-life concerns (Conner, 2012; Walsh, 2011). Only a few hundred people have been hurt (or killed) from the transmission of the H5N1 virus, and most of those have been in rather isolated locations.

But how about how science is being used for other reasons? It might seem extreme but synthetic biology is a realistic consideration of how the fields of engineering, medicine and even computer technology can be brought together to literally create new kinds and types of life (Guttmann,
View Full Essay

Albert Einstein 1879-1955 Was a

Words: 326 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63560243

Both of them are very accurate but they do not work together and he tried to solve that problem for the rest of his life. Einstein knew that this problem would have to be solved if we wanted to understand exactly what happened to create the universe in the very first instant of time.

If Albert Einstein were alive today, he would also be trying to stop war because he was very opposed to warfare between nations. He would also be working to promote nuclear power plants for energy and to reduce or eliminate nuclear weapons as much as possible. During World War II, Einstein knew it was necessary to invent the atomic bomb to end the war but he was very opposed to nuclear weapons otherwise.

eferences

Goldsmith, D. (1997). The Ultimate Einstein. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Hawking, S. (2001). The Universe in a Nutshell. New…… [Read More]

References

Goldsmith, D. (1997). The Ultimate Einstein. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Hawking, S. (2001). The Universe in a Nutshell. New York: Bantam.
View Full Essay

Citizens in the United States

Words: 2671 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64071472

This is achieved through the increase of metabolic rates and lean body mass while eliminating excess fat and burning calories. hile the required amount of physical activity differs based on the caloric intake and body type, sports can assist an individual to maintain a healthy weight. For people who want to maintain a huge amount of weight loss, high-intensity sports can be the best option while reasonably-intensive physical activity helps in realizing weight stability.

ell-being of Muscles and Bones:

As previously mentioned, bone and muscle injuries are some of the most common health-related risks in sports participation. However, as an individual grows older, there is need for maintenance of the well-being of muscles and bones for proper body functioning. hen an individual takes into consideration the necessary precaution measures, sports and physical activity becomes increasingly for muscles, bones, and joints health. Participation in sports provides people with the required elements…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bahr, Roald, and Lars Engebretsen. Sports Injury Prevention. Vol. 17. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, 2011. Print.

Chambers, Abigail E.L., and Grant Cooper. "The Role of Sports and Activity in Osteoarthritis." Arthritis MD - Trusted Arthritis MD - Arthritis Information from Doctors Who Care. Arthritis MD. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. .

Cohen, Bradley. "How Does Playing Sports Affect Your Health?" LIVESTRONG.COM - The Limitless Potential of You. Demand Media, Inc., 30 Mar. 2011. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. .

Gotlin, Robert S. Sports Injuries Guidebook. Illustrated ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2008. Print.
View Full Essay

Royal Patronage of 17th Century

Words: 1558 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91247298

While France relied on direct involvement of the royal power, either through the King or his ministers, ritain had a more formal royal patronage, that encouraged the activity, but did not sponsor or finance it. This also meant that in the former case, the activity was directed towards studies that could directly help the state, while in the latter case, the activity was much less directed by royal interest.

ibliography

1. Saunders, Stewart. Louis XIV: Patron of Science and Technology. From The Sun King: Louis XIV and the New World, edited by Steven G. Reinhardt, pp. 155-67. (New Orleans: Louisiana Museum Foundation, 1984.)

2. History of the Royal Society. On the Internet at http://royalsociety.org/History-of-the-Royal-Society/. Last retrieved on July 22, 2010

3. Findlen, Paula. Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan. Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Saunders, Stewart. Louis XIV: Patron of Science and Technology. From The Sun King: Louis XIV and the New World, edited by Steven G. Reinhardt, pp. 155-67. (New Orleans: Louisiana Museum Foundation, 1984.)

2. History of the Royal Society. On the Internet at http://royalsociety.org/History-of-the-Royal-Society/. Last retrieved on July 22, 2010

3. Findlen, Paula. Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan. Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009)

4. Thomas Dereham to James Jurin. 22 June 1722, in Early Letters, Royal Society in London, D.2.12
View Full Essay

Patterns of Interaction

Words: 451 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19060477

Group Interactions

Social scientists often state that there are four models of group interaction, models of pluralism, assimilation, segregation, and genocide. These models exist on a sliding scale in terms of the degree of positive relations they exhibit between the dominant or hegemonic group and the minority or less powerful group involved in the interaction. In the first interactive model, that of pluralism, there is the smallest gulf of power between the majority and the minority group, or the most powerful and least powerful group in the dynamic. In a pluralistic state of interaction, no single group's set of values or one group truly dominates another group's set of values. This is a kind of mosaic model of group interaction, as is embraced in Canada, where a multitude of linguistic and ethnic groups are all considered equally 'Canadian,' and is also a model of interaction theoretically embraced within many American…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Staffing a New Crime Laboratory

Words: 1688 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86906306

The second is the methods of work that must follow a quality certified system.

Overall System Design

Since the work relates to scientific study, a scientific temperament and better equipped laboratory is a must. For each section of the system dealing with major and minor investigations, appropriate equipments, modern electronic gadgets and data processing systems must be provided and they must also be upgraded frequently. The personnel must be trained in the use and proper management of digital forensic laboratories and high technology crime detection and investigation. These must be installed and maintained on turnkey approach. One suggestion is to contract a company which has experience in setting up the lab and turn over the installation to them. For example, the Pyramid Company provides turnkey contracts for setting up such Laboratories and Centres. (Pyramic Cyber, 2012) Such service providers would provide for the commissioning of equipments and tools as specified…… [Read More]

References

ASCLD/LAB-International (2010) "Program Overview" Retrieved 14 November, 2012 from http://www.ascld-lab.org/documents/AL-PD-3041.pdf

CSTL. (2000) "Quality assurance standards for Forensicnda DNA Testing Laboratories"

Forensic Science Communications, vol. 2, no. 3, Retrieved 14 November, 2012 from  http://www.cstl.nist.gov/strbase/QAS/Final-FBI-Director-Forensic-Standards.pdf .

Forensic Access. (2011) "Quality management and quality standards support to the police:
View Full Essay

Nature of Science Even in

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97594194

Smith notes that it may be impossible to unequivocally prove something with one hundred percent accuracy; rather, scientists seek probability.

The term theory is often misconstrued: Smith states that "theories always explain facts." Moreover, there is no clear demarcation between a theory and a hypothesis. Theories are basically broad hypotheses. Laws, on the other hand, are more restrictive and are often derived from theories. The practice of science entails experimentation as well as presentation to the scientific community. When the research is presented to other scientists, it is usually done so through peer-reviewed journals. Often other scientists will critique and critically evaluate the scientific experiment and attempt to replicate it. When the experiment has been replicated the hypothesis may become part of the canon of established science and from there, common knowledge.

Because science can only deal with what is observable and measurable, it can not apply to philosophy, aesthetics,…… [Read More]

Reference

Smith, David. "The Nature of Science."
View Full Essay

Mainstream Media and Science

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27476844

1. When you hear the word “scientist” what do you envision?
When I hear the word “scientist”, what I picture is an individual conducting practical experiments and also proving theories with the endeavor of advancing the field of science and the world at large. However, I also picture both aspects of science encompassing the scientists that wish to make the world a better place, for instance, preserving the earth and also advancing scientific theories as well as the scientists that use knowledge for negative purposes such as creating bombs and viruses.

2. Discuss at least three characteristics of your vision of a scientist
One of the characteristics of my vision of a scientist is having had formulated and developed a scientific theory that had massive impact. A second characteristic of a scientist is someone who is extremely smart and intellectual and lastly I consider scientists to be revolutionary.

3. Which…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Christian Science Many of the Most Famous

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92983829

Christian Science

Many of the most famous scientists in world history also happened to believe in God: including Copernicus, Bacon, Kepler, Gallileo, and Newton ("Famous Scientists Who Believed in God," n.d.). These great scientists had no trouble reconciling their faith with their practice; their Christian beliefs with their research and investigations into the known universe. Yet science has morphed from an integrated realm of study to one that excludes religion from its ranks. It has become anathema to be a practicing Christian and a practicing scientist. It does not have to be; in fact, science and religion comfortably coexist and each can benefit the other.

One of the arguments against Christians being able to be good scientists is that they are too prone to personal bias. Sure, some Christians are prone to bias, but so is any scientist. Scientists are biased by their personal beliefs no matter where those beliefs…… [Read More]

References

Boyce, K.A. (2001). Do science and Christianity coexist? Bede's Library. Retrieved online:  http://bede.org.uk/boyce.htm 

"Famous Scientists Who Believed in God," (n.d.). Retrieved online:  http://www.godandscience.org/apologetics/sciencefaith.html 

Lloyd, R. (2008). God and evolution can co-exist, scientist says. Live Science. Retrieved online:  http://www.livescience.com/5195-god-evolution-exist-scientist.html 

Samuel, S. (2011). Can science, creationism coexist? Christian Post. June 19, 2011. Retrieved online:  http://www.christianpost.com/news/can-science-and-creationism-coexist-one-christian-author-says-yes-51315/
View Full Essay

Knowledge Views on the Nature of Knowledge

Words: 5893 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24595821

Knowledge

Views on the Nature of Knowledge: Social Scientists vs. Natural Scientists

hat is knowledge? A simple question, or so most people would think. Knowledge is the accumulation of information on a given subject or subjects. It is a collection of facts, of things known to be true...or is it? The closer one looks, the more one comes to realize that there are many different approaches to obtaining knowledge, and many different definitions of precisely what constitutes knowledge. One's use of the term varies with one's own background and objectives. To some, knowledge is an absolute, to others; it is that which is gained through long hours of observation and long years of experience. The facts that make up what we call knowledge may be composed of absolutes, or they may be composed of many opinions, opinions that we believe to be most accurate or most correct. But what then…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Caldwell, Chris. The Prime Glossary: Perfect Number. 2002. URL:  http://primes.utm.edu/glossary/page.php?sort=PerfectNumber 

Gal Einai Institute of Israel. "Yud - The Mystical Significance of the Hebrew Letters." The Inner Dimension. No Date. URL:

http://www.inner.org/HEBLETER/yud.htm.

Pederson, K.C. "Scotland Raising Shedding Sheep for Wool Production." Twisted Spinsters: Obsessive Fiber Disorder. November 2000. URL: http://www.twistedspinsters.com/page14.html.
View Full Essay

Psychology First of All a

Words: 2432 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70728439

The fact that getting back into these activities will remove the negative reinforcement of somebody else doing her job around the house might change her behavior and get her to move around much faster.

As previously mentioned, all of these things that were mentioned are decided by an evaluation and a decision of the things that still motivate Dorothy's mother, assuming that she has not reached an age where she is indifferent about things. Dorothy can promise, as positive reinforcements, small gifts as well, such as books or music, which can grow in importance and value once the willingness to become independent again starts manifesting with Dorothy's mother. Some of the negative reinforcements will simply include things like removing some of the bitter medicine from the list of medicines that needs to be taken under all conditions.

Question

There are several situations or conditions when punishment will fail to enforce…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Misperception of Science Is That

Words: 345 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25785716



2. Scientists avoid using the terms "true" and "the truth" because they are too absolute. Science does not aim to give absolute knowledge. Instead, the scientific method relies on the senses and on experiments by creating hypotheses and testing them. Also, science is based on the five senses. The terms "true" and "truth" do not acknowledge the limitations of the five senses. Scientists understand that the body of knowledge created by science has changed over the years because of the development of better instruments to measure and gather data. The human senses might not change much, but the reliability of the senses change as instruments become more sophisticated. Scientists are constantly striving to improve the reliability of their observations and so can never claim to know the "truth." The five senses can point to what seems to be true, but scientists work with objectivity. Truth is a subjective issue, which…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Proton and Carbon NMR in

Words: 2198 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11539669

This information is utilized to create new products and substances that are used on a regular basis. For example, chemists could use the COSY process to understand how to create a new kind of raincoat that will be even more water resistant. To determine this, the protons inside the molecules of the raincoat would have to be examined through the COSY process. This will identify the peaks inside the protons and what specific attributes are similar to other compounds. Once this happens, is when scientists can use this as a way to create specific attributes that they are looking for (i.e. A raincoat that is more waterproof). This is significant, because it is showing how the contribution of the COSY methodology allows chemists to create new compounds with specific attributes. ("Thomaston," 2006)

HETCO is useful in understanding the genetic composition of a substance and the compounds that are used to…… [Read More]

References

Introduction to NRM Spectroscopy. (2003). UWI. Retrieved from:  http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm/spectra/nmrintro.html 

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. (2010). MSU. Retrieved from:  http://www2.chemistry.msu.edu/faculty/reusch/VirtTxtJml/Spectrpy/nmr/nmr1.htm 

Two Dimensional NMR. (2005). BBK. Retrieved from:  http://www.cryst.bbk.ac.uk/PPS2/projects/schirra/html/2dnmr.htm 

Bachovchin, W. (2001). Contributions of NRM Spectroscopy. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, 39, (1), 199 -- 213.
View Full Essay

Women in Science

Words: 1456 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72858863

ole of females in science [...] achel Carson and Barbara McClintock and compare each scientist to general principals characterizing the careers of women in science.

WOMEN IN SCIENCE

One becomes a scientist by viewing the world in a particular manner; scientists select for study those aspects of the world that are amenable to analysis by scientific methodology. A person acting as a scientist constructs a scientific domain out of the world when s/he adopts a scientific attitude (Grinnell 2).

Most scientists face obstacles at some point in their career. Their research does not produce the results they expected. They lose their funding and must move to another research location. Critics do not agree with their findings or methods. When the scientist is a woman, she often faces even greater obstacles than her male counterparts. achel Carson and Barbara McClintock are two such women scientists, who worked relentlessly toward their goals,…… [Read More]

References

Aisenberg, Nadya, and Mona Harrington. Women of Academe: Outsiders in the Sacred Grove. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.

Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.

Editors. "The Barbara McClintock Papers." National Library of Medicine. 20 Sept. 2001. 9 Oct. 2002.  http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/LL/Views/Exhibit/narrative/missouri.html 

Grinnell, Frederick. The Scientific Attitude. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987.
View Full Essay

Born to Be Big Childhood

Words: 2102 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85178688

People can exercise their free choice at the grocery store by choosing organic foods, although because of generally higher costs of organic products, this will not be a solution for everyone. People in lower socioeconomic groups often get food at discount chains or even food pantries where organics are not even a choice at all.

There is no incentive for makers of agricultural chemicals to modify their products in response to charges about obesogens. As the documentary films the Future of Food and King Corn pointed out, the use of pesticides is very big business. Though detrimental effects of pesticides and genetically-modified seeds and food have been shown, further research is needed to prove the link between pesticides and genetic modifications that lead to obesity in infants and children. When and if that link is proven, the public will have to demand that the government take action. Consumer advocate organizations…… [Read More]

References

Adler, N.E., & Stewart, J. (2009). Reducing obesity: motivating action while not blaming the victim. Milbank Quarterly 87 (1), pp. 49-70. Retrieved from Academic Search

Premier database December 29, 2010.

Baillie-Hamilton, P.F. (2002). Chemical toxins: a hypothesis to explain the global obesity epidemic. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine 8 (2), pp. 185-192.

DOI: 10.1089/107555302317371479. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database December 29, 2010.
View Full Essay

Intuition by Allegra Goodman The

Words: 695 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90384619

Thus, to bring Cliff's supposed cure into a world where people are desperate for hope, when it is not adequately backed with science, seems dangerous.

There is also the question of obtaining funding for research, an obsession amongst all of Goodman's scientists. Scientists must prove that their research is bearing fruit, and it is very tempting to exaggerate the positive effects initially, in the hopes of gaining funding that will pay off in the long run. Goodman suggests that science has been corrupted by both a hunger for money and a hunger for publicity that has tainted the real reasons people entered science in the first place. A 'good' or pure scientist does not really exist any more, when politics and the need to make a profit, more than evidence, dictates the truth, instead of hard data and the desire of the scientist to heal. Both Cliff and Robin are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goodman, Allegra. Intuition. New York: Random House, 2007.
View Full Essay

Science and Skepticism Climate Change

Words: 1884 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1092500

He even goes so far as to claim that if global warming does occur, it will be a positive thing. Higher temperatures would be positive for agriculture and forests. He believes that higher temperatures will actually cause sea levels to drop, and wraps up his interview with the cheery optimism that everyone appreciates warmer weather.

igley isn't quite as upbeat. He points out that because uncertainty is a built in component of the climate models, it is just as likely that the scientists have erred on the side of caution as it is that they have erred on the side of excess. This means that the effects of global warming could be much worse than what the models predict. His overall concern:

I]t's not so much just the temperature changes, but it's the changes in all other aspects of the environment: amounts of precipitation, the ability for vegetation to maintain…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bailey, Ronald. "Why Meaning?" Reason (Apr. 2004): 10-12.

First Test of Predictions of Climate Change Impacts on Biodiversity." Space Daily (15 July 2005): NA. General OneFile. Gale. 27 Nov. 2007  http://find.galegroup.com .

New Observations Confirm Recent Warming of the Tropical Atmosphere." Space Daily (15 Aug. 2005): NA. General OneFile. Gale. 27 Nov. 2007.
View Full Essay

Genetically Modified GM Crops Specifically

Words: 2025 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50893239

For example, if birds feed on seeds and a certain variety of insect, without the seeds, the birds may disappear, and the insects would then overpopulate the area.

In addition, the cost of GM crops is initially high to the farmer. These seeds cost much more to develop and test, and so, they are much more costly to the farmer. They might benefit Third World agriculture in many ways, but few Third World farmers could possibly afford the increased cost of these seeds, and so, they would not be available to a majority of the people that need them the most. Cost is an important factor in the continued growth of GM crops, and so, manufacturers must eventually address the cost of these seeds, and reduce the cost so that more people can afford to plant them.

While no study has found GM food to be harmful to humans, opponents…… [Read More]

References

Black, Richard. 2004, 'Study Finds Benefits in GM Crops.' BBC.com. [Online]. Available at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4046427.stm.

Editors. 2005, 'Genetically Modified Foods.' World Health Organization. [Online]. Available at http://www.who.int/foodsafety/biotech/en/.

Goldstein, M.C., & Goldstein, M.A. 2002, Controversies in Food and Nutrition. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Pickrell, John. 2004, 'GM Organisms: Instant Expert.' NewScientist.com. [Online]. Available at http://www.newscientist.com/popuparticle.ns?id=in35.
View Full Essay

Cultural Forms of Expression African-American

Words: 2857 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48259043

(Cha-Jua, 2001, at (http://www.wpunj.edu/newpol/issue31/chajua31.htm)

Another aspect of representation, however, concerns collective memory and the representation of a shared past. Through the context for dialogue they create, social movements facilitate the interweaving of individual stories and biographies into a collective, unified frame, a collective narrative. Part and parcel of the process of collective identity or will formation is the linking of diverse experiences into a unity, past as well as present. Social movements are central to this process, not only at the individual level, but also at the organizational or meso level of social interaction. Institutions like the black church and cultural artifacts like blues music may have embodied and passed on collective memories from generation to generation, but it was through social movements that even these diverse collective memories attained a more unified focus, linking individuals and collectives into a unified subject, with a common future as well as a…… [Read More]

Resources

Cashmore, E. (2003). Encyclopedia of Race and Ethnic Studies. New York: Routledge.

Cha-Jua, S.K. (Summer 2001) "Slavery, Racist Violence, American Apartheid: The Case for Reparations" New Politics, 8:3. At http://www.wpunj.edu/newpol/issue31/chajua31.htm

Dubois, W.E.B., (1987) Writings, New York: Library of America.

Davis, A. (1999) Blues Legacies and Black Feminism, New York: Vintage.
View Full Essay

Rick Houser's Book Counseling and Educational Research

Words: 6074 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60383503

ICK HOUSE'S BOOK COUNSELING AND EDUCATIONAL ESEACH

ick Houser's book "Counseling and Educational esearch"

ick Houser's book "Counseling and Educational esearch"

Why is it important to acquire necessary skills in research for a counselor?

Clinical counselors are doctoral-level providers of health services skilled in counseling clients while evaluating and treating emotional and mental disorders utilizing scientific theories and methods. Adequate interpersonal correspondence skills are imperative. A clinical counselor must have the ability to listen eagerly and understand what customers communicate with them, and have the capacity to talk clearly with customers about sensitive issues. This occupation also requires basic thinking skills, as clinical therapists must have the capacity to utilize logic and reason to solve and interpret complex issues. Houser writes: "… but I believe acquiring the skill to evaluate how knowledge was generated is a key skill in functioning as a professional and dissociates those with advanced graduate degrees…… [Read More]

References

Houser. R. (2009). Counseling and educational research: Evaluation and application. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

McLeod. J. (2003). Doing counseling research (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
View Full Essay

Discovery of the Structure of

Words: 1672 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81223929

However, the use of this technology has also introduced a whole host of ethical and health issues. This is important, because how these issue are wrestled with in the future, will determine the way this technology will be applied to daily life.

A bibliography that includes all references cited in the report and a 1-2 sentence summary of what information was gained from each reference.

20 Questions on Genetically Modified Foods. (2010). HO. Retrieved from: http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/biotech/20questions/en/

This source identified specific ethical and health issues that are affecting the use of genetic engineering. It was useful in recognizing specific factors and issues that could be affecting the way genetic engineering is impacting daily life.

The Search for the Structure of DNA. (2010). Online Ethics. Retrieved from: http://www.onlineethics.org/Education/precollege/scienceclass/sectone/cs4.aspx

This source was useful in providing background as to when DNA was discovered and what compounds were looked at before its discovery.

Ejelonu, A.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

20 Questions on Genetically Modified Foods. (2010). WHO. Retrieved from: http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/biotech/20questions/en/

The Search for the Structure of DNA. (2010). Online Ethics. Retrieved from:  http://www.onlineethics.org/Education/precollege/scienceclass/sectone/cs4.aspx 

What is DNA. (2010). NIH. Retrieved from: http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/basics/dna

Ejelonu, A. (2002). What is the Human Genome Project. Serendip. Retrieved from:  http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f01/web1/ejelonu.html
View Full Essay

Science and Morality After the

Words: 1361 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57790064



That is not to say that theory and application cannot be separated into ethical categories. They can be, but those categorizations are always going to be somewhat skewed by the researcher, because no human being is capable of perfect neutrality. To assume that one can research for the sake of purse science really does involve imaging that scientists are not human beings with their own personal motivations. Moreover, this is not an issue that developed in the post-atomic world. Even before the use of the atomic bomb, scientists were motivated by personal motivations that kept them from being completely neutral. Therefore, it might be better to consider the ethics of scientific discovery from a viewpoint that includes the inherent morality of a discovery. For example, chemotherapy could be used as a weapon with very disastrous results, because its side-effects are devastating and can even be fatal. However, chemotherapies are developed…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Arctic Melt Unnerves the Experts by Andrew

Words: 1336 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91978377

Arctic Melt Unnerves the Experts" by Andrew C. Revkin, printed in the New York Times on October 2, 2007. Its focus lies on the Arctic ice cap -- particularly, on the rapidly decreasing amount of floating ice there. It reports that during the summer of 2007, the amount of floating ice melted to "an extent unparalleled in a century or more," and that upon discovering this information, scientists were "unnerved." The article cites a study that found that during that summer, ice had not only melted but moved -- out of the Arctic basin and past Greenland. It reports that the rate at which the ice melted was far more than any scientist or report had previously speculated, but that there exists between scientists disagreement about the true cause for this event. Still, the article says, many of those scientists believe that the Arctic "is heading toward a new, more…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Corell, Robert W. "Challenges of Climate Change: An Arctic Perspective." Ambio 35.4 (2006):

148-152.

Revkin, Andrew C. "Arctic Melt Unnerves the Experts." New York Times 2 October 2007.
View Full Essay

Astrophysical Object Pluto's Demotion From

Words: 2104 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92220572

"Once every 248 Earth years, Pluto swings inside the orbit of Neptune. It stays there for twenty years. During those twenty years, Pluto is closer to the Sun than Neptune. During this period of time, like the other eight planets, Pluto's atmosphere undergoes a fundamental change in character, briefly developing an atmosphere. As methane and nitrogen frozen at the poles thaw. As it moves toward its farthest point from the Sun, Pluto's atmosphere freezes and falls back to the ground" (Dejoie & Truelove 2008).

These eccentricities further suggested that Pluto was really much more "like a new group of objects found in the outer solar system," called dwarf planets and not worthy of the status of the other eight (Inman, 2008, p.2). Still, many astronomers argued in favor of a more inclusive definition that would still retain Pluto's status as a planet. In fact, one radical proposal: "would have made…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Britt, Robert Roy. "What is a planet>" Space.com. 2 Nov 2000. August 2, 2008. http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/planet_confusion_001101-2.html

Britt, Robert Roy. "Scientists decide Pluto's no longer a planet." MSNBC.com. August 24, 2006.

August 2, 2008. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14489259/

Cain, Fraser. "Why is Pluto not a planet>" Universe Today. April 10, 2008. August 1, 2008. http://www.universetoday.com/2008/04/10/why-pluto-is-no-longer-a-planet/
View Full Essay

People Fear DNA Because Criminals

Words: 2851 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35999004

This can contribute directly to human health and development (Agio). orlaug (1999), who won the Nobel Prize in 1970 for his work in developing high-yield wheat and other grains in third-world countries, stresses that genetic engineering is essential due to the worldwide population growth. Other organizations supporting genetically modified foods are the American Medical Association, the International Association of African Scientists, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.

Of course, there are always two sides to every coin, and individuals such as Ronnie Cummins, national director of the ioDemocracy Campaign, a grassroots organization that promotes organic food and opposes genetic engineering in agriculture, states that genetically modified foods can result in production of items that are toxic, carcinogenic, and allergenic. She warns that widespread planting of GM crops could cause unexpected harm to the environment; as crops are engineered to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

AgBio World, Scientists in support of agricultural biotechnology. February 27, 2008  http://www.agbioworld.org/declaration/index.html 

BioDemocracy. Hazards of genetically engineered food and crops. Ronnie Cummins. http://www.organicconsumers.org/ge-free.cfm

N. Borlaug, (1999) Biotech can feed eight billion in the next century. New perspectives quarterly 25(1): 129-132

D.A. Christopher. (2000). The Gene genie's progeny. In the World & I. Washington, DC: Washington Times Corporation.
View Full Essay

Requiring Air Bags in Cars

Words: 2889 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6056535

Air Bags in Cars

The Politics of Air Bags

Air bags weren't always in cars. They have come about as a fairly recent development, and the rise of the air bag was due to politics. hile this may sound strange, many things that individuals take for granted today have come about because special interest groups were concerned about a specific aspect of public policy or public safety. These individuals or groups then worked to change laws or to have laws enacted that made the world, in their opinion, a better place.

The purpose of this paper is to examine air bags from a political standpoint. In other words, the goal of this paper is not to make a judgment as to whether air bags in cars are good or bad, but rather to look at the political changes that caused them to come about in the first place.

In order…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carter, Craig C. "Politics & Policy: Air Bags Puff On. Carmakers are installing them as federal rules requiring passive restraints look certain." Fortune 9 December 1985: 135.

Healey, James R & Jayne O'Donnell. "Air bag fatalities shock backers into soul-searching." USA Today 8 July 1996: 02B.

Lambrecht, Bill. "Who is He? Ashcroft gets hard questions, some jokes about obscurity on New Hampshire swing." St. Louis Post-Dispatch 12 August 1997: 01A.

Leavitt, Paul. "Air bags save lives." USA Today 5 November 1996: 14A.
View Full Essay

Growth Hormones in Our Food

Words: 2875 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95346274



More objectivity is however expected from scientists, but their opinions also vary. Specifically, the opinions of those who support growth hormones and those who reject them are all derived from scientific evidence. This in turn means that the results of scientific research could be manipulated and influenced so that the findings are indicative of the desires of those who initiated the study. In this particular sense, the most pertinent situation is revealed by the beef and dairy producers, who hire their own scientists to lead the research process in the direction desired by them.

Aside from these situations however, the scientists who have conducted studies tend to link various health problems with the growth hormones. Some of the side effects to consuming products with residual matters from growth hormones include the onset of early puberty in girls, an increase in the risk of breast cancer, an increase in the risk…… [Read More]

References:

Leonard, a., the story of stuff, the Story of Stuff Project, http://www.storyofstuff.org / last accessed on February 21, 2012

McLaughlin, a. 2011, the effects of growth hormones in food, Live Strong, http://www.livestrong.com/article/98816-effects-growth-hormones / last accessed on February 21, 2012

Artificial hormones, Sustainable Table, http://www.sustainabletable.org/issues/hormones / last accessed on February 21, 2012

EU scientists confirm health risks of growth hormones in meat, Organic Consumer Association, http://www.organicconsumers.org/toxic/hormone042302.cfm last accessed on February 21, 2012
View Full Essay

Scientific Knowledge

Words: 2208 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11338397

Scientific Knowledge

There lies question on whether scientific knowledge is able to answer all the questions that relate to physical reality. For many years, people have wondered what the earth is composed of, leaving them wondering if the nature's secrets will one day be revealed (Grant 64). However, it is notable that since Galileo discovered the moon in 1608, there has been a remarkable move by his fellow scientists.

A lot of studies in science including the origin of the solar system, sonata of the stars, how matter changes to energy, and detailed works of an atom, among others has not fully exposed the science knowledge. However, the human culture seems to change with science. orldview patterns prove that complex systems studies by working from their smallest constituents meaning from bottom up. These paradigms also confirm that the laws of nature pounce from deep symmetry writs in to the basics…… [Read More]

Works cited

Berlin, I. Concepts and Categories New York: Viking Press, 2006

Davis, P. Cosmin Jackpot: Why Our Universe is Just Right for Life California: Houghton Mifflin 2007

Grant, EA History of Natural Philosophy: From the Ancient World to the Nineteenth Century. London: Cambridge University Press, 2007 pp. 62 -- 67

Gleiser, M. The dancing Universe: Creation Myths to the Big Bang New York: Continuum 2001