Student Achievement Essays (Examples)

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Student Collaboration

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24818868

Student achievement at the elementary level has become an issue of great academic and educational importance. This level of education is of utmost importance in order to ensure the effective future learning, growth, and adulthood of the children involved. It is therefore of great importance to ensure the highest possible student achievement at the elementary level. The literature has revealed, however, that there are so many components to the relationships among students and teachers at this level that it is difficult to determine precisely what is at the heart of students achieving better results during their elementary school careers. Some, for example, focus on teacher qualification, while others consider the relationship between the teacher and students in a classroom. One strategy, investigated by Bancroft (2010), is student collaboration. Although this is not a new strategy in terms of pedagogy, significant benefits could be derived in terms of focusing on elementary…… [Read More]

References

Bancroft, B.L. (2010, Apr. 13) Enhancing Student Achievement Through Cooperative Learning at the Elementary level. Retrieved from:  http://www.nmu.edu/sites/DrupalEducation/files/UserFiles/Files/Pre-Drupal/SiteSections/Students/GradPapers/Projects/Bancroft_Briana_MP.pdf
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Achievement Testing

Words: 325 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50136462

Achievement Testing

Howell and ueda in their article Achievement Testing with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students question the veracity of the widely used Standardized Norm-eferenced Achievement Test (SNAT) in measuring systematic differences among group means. As they point out, SNAT characteristics, are: completely nonaligned with instruction; assume a uniform curriculum, schooling, language proficiency and sociocultural experience across student groups; and are designed for an outside purpose of formulating education policy. Given the limitations of SNATs, Howell and ueda explore the alternative Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) and the Performance Assessment (PA) approaches to student achievement. Though more aligned to classroom curriculum and instruction, these alternatives too have their limitations. The CBM focus on task-analytic decomposition of complex domains, for example, is of concern for teachers of language minority students who commonly use more holistic or 'whole-language' approaches. Similarly, the reliance of PA on the use of complex and interactive tasks is more…… [Read More]

References

Howell, K.W. & Rueda, R. Achievement Testing with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

Students. Handbook of Multicultural Assessment. p. 253-284

Weiler, J. (Apr. 1998). Recent Changes in School Desegregation. ERIC/CUE Digest. No. 133
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Student Assessment and Standardized Tests

Words: 1747 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78209840

There are, for example, many ways for a student to present an understanding of the causes of the U.S. Civil War" (1999, p. 35).

Conclusion

The research showed high stakes standardized testing approaches are becoming increasingly commonplace in the nation's schools, and the outcome of these testing regimens has enormous implications for the students involved, as well as for their teachers and schools. The research also showed that by formulating standards to match these standardized tests, teachers run the risk of "teaching to the test" rather than providing their students with the type of education that is needed in the 21st century. While they are more complex and difficult to administer, the research also showed that portfolios and other assessment techniques such as capstone projects provide a more comprehensive and accurate way to determine how well students are learning and where they may need help.

eferences

Blasi, M. (2005). Standardized…… [Read More]

References

Blasi, M. (2005). Standardized tests: A teacher's perspective. Childhood Education, 81(4), 242-

Garcia, N. & Fleming, J. (1999). Are standardized tests fair to African-Americans? Journal of Higher Education, 69(5), 471-472.

Neill, D.M. (1999). Transforming student assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 78(1), 34-35.

Sacks, P. (2000). Standardized minds: The high price of America's testing culture and what we can do to change it. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing.
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Students and Learning

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91054153

Students and Learning

The learner-based outcome that I've chosen for this paper involves all students being able to successfully complete a physical education curriculum designed to enhance overall physical strength, improve dexterity and increase stamina. For this learner-based outcome, it is important to create a rubric so that students understand the criteria involved for measuring success. Toward this endeavor, it is important to include concrete, attainable and measurable goals for all students.

Such a physical education curriculum involving learner based outcomes is justified given the importance of physical activity for children. Childhood obesity is a serious social problem in America. The effects of obesity in childhood are well documented in both the social science literature and medical journals. During the last 30 years, the percentage of obese children between the ages of 6 and 11 has risen 200% while the percentage of obese children between 12 and 19 has tripled…… [Read More]

References:

Golder, G. (2003). Inclusive education: Making the most of what's available. The British Journal of Teaching Physical Education, 34(2), 2327.

McCaughtry, N., & Rovegno, I. (2003). Development of pedagogical content knowledge: Moving from blaming students to predicting skilfulness, recognizing motor development, and understanding emotion. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 22(4), 355-368.

Rink, J.E. (2001). Investigating the assumptions of pedagogy. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 20(2), 112-128.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010). The Role of Schools in Preventing Childhood Obesity. Retrieved from:  http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf
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Student's Performance or Potential Could

Words: 301 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55053532



Q2.Identify specific behaviors that would help an educator understand student achievement, cognition, behavior, and communication.

Coming to class on time and being 'ready to learn,' being able to pay attention to the teacher without being unduly distracted by outside stimuli, being able to be organized, and showing consideration for the welfare of others and the rules of the classroom in an age-appropriate fashion are all important for an educator to note when evaluating a student's ability to achieve. Students that show deficits in these areas as well as fail to meet certain benchmarks of student achievement may need additional assessment and support. A student's social behaviors, such being able to empathize with others and a student's cognitive capacity to demonstrate age-appropriate understanding of concepts such as form and mass are also important to note.… [Read More]

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Student Assessment What Is the Most Appropriate

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26020345

Student Assessment

hat is the most appropriate way to assess student achievement? The commission of the National Middle School Assessment of student achievement suggests "authentic assessment refers to evaluation that makes use of real life tasks instead of contrived test items." (NMSA, 2000) In other words, rather than focus on testing students more, a greater interest and study of effective teaching practices are better employed in further research regarding education. The National Middle School Assessment Authentic assessment also suggests that while standardized testing may occasionally function as a rough means of evaluating all children, such as identifying children with possible special needs, assessment in a truly learner-centered classroom will vary. "Examples of types of assessment are performance tasks, portfolios, student self-assessment surveys and probes, peer assessments, journals, logs, products, and projects. Successful assessment improves learning, instruction and program effectiveness." (NMS 2000, citing Donald, 1997) In my own school district, located…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ellis, Edwin & Lou Anne Worthington, Martha J. Larkin. (2005) "Executive Summary of the Research Synthesis on Effective Teaching Principles and the Design of Quality Tools for Educators." Area of Teacher Education, Programs in Special Education University of Alabama Report. Retrieved 23 Oct 2005

http://idea.uoregon.edu/~ncite/documents/techrep/tech06.html

'Executive Summary." (2001) Child Left Behind Act' of 2001. Summary of research retrieved 23 Oct 2005

http://www.ed.gov/nclb/overview/intro/execsumm.html
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Students Transitioning From One School to Another

Words: 542 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83410175

students transitioning from one school to another, the current research examines the subjective impressions of students as well as their academic performance outcomes. Student achievement is measured not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively, in terms of social performance and psychological well-being. This research takes into account academic performance, but also includes a small sample of students from a New Zealand public school who had recently transitioned.

easons for student transitions may be due to the family being in the military, family job shifts, or immigration. The stressors that moving entails can place psychological strains upon the student, thereby impacting well-being as well as academic performance. In particular, research shows that transitioning can lead to social vulnerability and reduced self-esteem. Because psychological and social well-being have been proven vital to student success, it is important to study the elements that make for a successful student transition. Schools aware of what creates…… [Read More]

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Students' Motivation

Words: 3728 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81753158

student motivation in the learning environment and what motivates students to study. The evaluation begins with a theoretical background on the issue of student motivation based on existing literature and studies on the issue. This is followed by a literature review of 10 studies that have been carried out on the student motivation in various classroom settings and learning environments. Through this review the author has identified various factors that motivate students to study including creation of a supportive learning environment, use of suitable teaching practices, and use of multi-level strategies. The article also includes a discussion regarding the significance of student motivation in the learning process.

One of the most important goals of an educational environment is to motivate students toward environmentally friendly behavior change. The need for student motivation in the high school setting is attributed to the fact that motivation creates positive experience, which helps in improving…… [Read More]

References

Daniels, E. (2011, November). Creating Motivating Learning Environments: Teachers Matter.

Middle School Journal, 32-37.

Darner, R. (2012, August). An Empirical Test of Self-determination Theory As A Guide to Fostering Environmental Motivation. Environmental Education Research 18(4), 463-472.

Hardre, P.L. (2012). Standing in the Gap: Research that Informs Strategies for Motivating and Retaining Rural High School Students. Rural Educator, 12-18.
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Aanlzying Student Affairs Professionals

Words: 2642 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40189121

Student Affairs Professionals

Values

What, in your view, should the purpose of higher education entail?

Degree-granting institutes are expected to make sure that college-goers develop both generic dispositions (e.g., beliefs, attitudes, curiosity, etc.) and skills (communication, oral, written, compassion, tolerance, etc.), and discipline-specific abilities (e.g., knowledge, skills, attribute, responsibility, etc.) on completing their college degree. Existing research indicates that receiving higher education doesn't only entail acquiring discipline-specific education or applied competences. ather, affective and socio-emotional skills (non-cognitive factors), which make a graduate an effective citizen, also constitute valuable outcomes for career readiness and college success (Chan, Brown, Ludlow, & Noguera, 2015).

I believe that higher education's chief purpose is, and ought to be, the development of prepared young minds. Higher education, specifically, and education, in general, have numerous purposes, of which one among the most crucial is promotion of citizenship. By surveying the present-day political scene, I feel that the…… [Read More]

References

Astin, A. (1968). The college environment. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

Chan, R. Y., Brown, G. T., Ludlow, L. H., & Noguera, J. J. (2015, August 7). The Public and Civic Purpose of Higher Education: Exploring the "Non-Economic" Benefits for Completeing a College Degree. Retrieved from Academia: https://www.academia.edu/2626994/What_is_the_purpose_of_higher_education_Comparing_student_and_institutional_perspectives_for_completing_a_bachelor_s_degree_in_the_21st_century

Delaney, J. T. (2013, October 20). The Ideal Student. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://www.katz.pitt.edu/deanblog/?p=193

Dungy, G. J. (2009). Re-inventing Student Affairs: The Search for Mission in Changing Times. Journal of College and Character, 10(5).
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Achievement of African-American Students in Civilian Public

Words: 1931 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11979243

achievement of African-American students in civilian public schools vs. African-American students in the Depart of Defense (DOD) school system

The methods section of this dissertation provides the rationale for the proposed study based on my hypothesis comparing African-American students in the DOD school system with African-American students in civilian school systems.

It also highlights the key questions that were examined, how the study was conducted and the measuring criteria for analysis. The paper will provide detailed information that should be a sufficient foundation for anyone who wishes to conduct a parallel study.

This portion of the paper will provide an outline of the following:

Purpose - which will define my reason for doing this study

Background Information - will provide information on the level of measurement I have selected, i.e. The SAT scores and information on the Department of Defense (DOD) school system itself

Procedure - outlines the steps that…… [Read More]

Fact Sheet. The National Center for Fair and Open Testing. Cambridge, MA. August 2001.

George A. Clowes. "Defense Dept. Knows How to Operate Good Schools, Too." School Reform News. January 2002.

Defense Department Taps Distance Learning Tools. www.wtonline.com.Volume13, No.22. February
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Students With ADHD

Words: 1533 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91522386

Students with ADHD

Education 518, Section B13

Dr. Carolyn McCreight

Qualitative article review: Students with ADHD

Homeschooling is one of the controversial approaches to educate children with 'special needs'. Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are preferred to be taught at home by their parents. Instructors for homeschooling are also arranged for this purpose. However, there has been widespread criticism on this method of teaching attention-deficit students. The main purpose of this paper is to review a qualitative study conducted on the topic of providing homeschooling to attention-deficit students. Duvall, Delquadri and Ward (2004) conducted a study to investigate the appropriateness of homeschooling environment for instructing basic skills to children with special needs. The main purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain whether or not parents of children having attention-deficit as well as hyperactivity disorder could provide their children with instructional environmental that was conducive for facilitating acquisition of…… [Read More]

References

Duvall, S.F., Delquadri, J.C., & Ward, D.L. (2004). A Preliminary Investigation of the Effectiveness of Home-school Instructional Environments for Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. School Psychology Review, 33(1), 140-158.
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Achievement Outside of the Classroom My Parents

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27445119

Achievement Outside of the Classroom

My parents were against the idea of a dog, but I was determined that we would get a puppy. I did my research, and, information in hand, pitched the idea of raising an assistance dog to my parents. We would raise a puppy for a year, providing it with care and teaching basic commands. If she passed her tests, she would be trained as an assistance dog. If not, we would have the option of keeping her. My parents fell for it, hook, line, and sinker, and two months later we picked up Frito, a yellow-lab puppy. Between chewed-up shoes, obedience school, ruined carpet, romps in the park, and playing ball, the year flew by more quickly than I ever imagined it would, and the day came to have Frito's skills assessed. I watched nervously, half-hoping that he would mess up as the trainer tested…… [Read More]

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Student Survival Guide Conducting Successful

Words: 1598 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19032097



Setting and Achieving Goals

Identify shat your short- and long-term educational and career goals are as soon as you can. If you are focused early, you can start making plans now by applying for grad school programs or internships or researching all the available opportunities for people in your field. Don't take for granted that your transition from university to the professional world or the world of graduate school will be seamless. It can take months to find out what graduate or professional programs are out there and even what career options are available in your favorite fields. Talk to your academic advisors as well as your family and friends about how to plan for the future. Be open-minded and flexible to match the job market. You are bound to encounter obstacles as you plan for your future. Try not be dejected when you are rejected from graduate schools or…… [Read More]

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Achievement Levels Teaching Methods the

Words: 690 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7504409



The issues raised in this article are very important. I agree with the proposition that thinking and writing are linked; so that you can understand elements of thinking through writing. However, I am not certain that it is such a strong correlation that you can determine thinking through writing. Thinking is much more complex than what can be discerned from what a student places on the script as a response. I would also add that to place a response requires thinking processes that are not mapped. By this, I mean that I am not sure what is actually measured when you assess the students writing. What level of thinking are you assessing? Some students may be able to provide the correct response but they cannot successfully articulate the processes that were employed to arrive at that position.

I am in complete agreement with the need to create tools that are…… [Read More]

Reference

Kwan, F. (2010). True/false test: Enhancing its power through writing. Journal of Instructional

Pedagogies, 4, 1-10. Retrieved February 22, 2011, from ABI/INFORM Global.

(Document ID: 2170766341)
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Students' Email Usage and Student

Words: 10852 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84013386

This research will fill in a gap that was discovered in the literature review. There have been many, even in an academic setting, that have made comments regarding the effects of email on the student environment. However, there have been no significant studies to substantiate these claims. This study will fill in the existing gap in research and will examine the actual importance of email to the academic setting.

Chapter 2: Literature eview

The importance of technology in the academic setting was an accepted fact from the inception of the internet. However, there have been few academic studies that have attempted to quantify its impact on student lives and success. In order to understand the importance of email and its impact on students lives, one must examine several areas of academic research on the topic. It has been implied that self-esteem and a feeling of satisfaction play an important role…… [Read More]

References

Beffa-Negrini, P., Miller, B., and Cohen, N. (2002). Factors related to success and satisfaction in online learning. Academic Exchange Quarterly. September 2002.

Borowitz S., & Wyatt J. (1998) the origin, content, and workload of e-mail consultations. JAMA 280: 1321-4.

CNN.com. (2003). Firm can e-mail at work. September 19, 2003. CNN.Com Retrieved October 29, 2007 at  http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/internet/09/19/e-mail.ban/index.html 

Ferguson T. (1996). A guided tour of self-help cyberspace. [monograph on the Internet]. Rockville (MD): Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 1996 Retrieved November 3, 2007 at http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/confrnce/partnr96/summary.htm
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Student Retention Has Long Been

Words: 5392 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13282475

The next three categories deal with the lack of information: 4) lack of information about the career decision-making process, itself; 5) lack of information about one's own capabilities, personal traits or interests; 6) lack of information about occupations and what work is involved and the type of work available; and 7) lack of information about ways of obtaining career information. The final three categories deal with the inconsistent information that students receive that make decision-making difficult: 8) inconsistent information due to unreliable sources;

9) inconsistent information due to internal conflicts, such personal identity and 10) insistent information due to external conflicts with significant others.

Once students have had a an opportunity to learn more about their personal traits in relationship to careers and the type of positions available, they want to actually have an opportunity to learn more right from the source. However, even at community schools, only two percent…… [Read More]

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School Librarians Impact Stduents Achievement

Words: 1488 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 349923

(Lance, 2001)

Lance additionally states that "one of the most consistent strands of research on this topic is evidenced by studied that demonstrate the value of" those as follows:

(1) quality collections of books and other materials selected to support the curriculum;

(2) State-of-the-art technology that is integrated into the learning / teaching processes; and (3) Cooperation between school and other types of libraries, especially public libraries. (Lance, 2001)

Stated as a key role of the library media specialist and one that has only been the focus of research for about the last decade is program administration since in today's schools "library media specialists are not only managers of the library media center but also advocates for information literacy with the principal, at faculty meetings, and in standards and curriculum committee meetings." (Lance, 2001) Library media specialists are further stated to be "trainers who provide in-service programs for teachers on…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Todd, Ross J. (2007) School Administrators' Support for School Libraries: The Impact on Student Academic Achievement. Learning & Media Vol. 35 No. 1 Winter 2007.

Houston, Cynthia R. (2007) Measuring Up: Academic Achievement of 'Beyond Proficiency' Standards in School Library Media Centers Across Kentucky. Kentucky Libraries Vol. 71 No. 3 Summer 2007.

Collier, Jackie (2007) School Librarians Rock: Librarian's Powerful Impact on Literacy Development: Reflections of Teacher Candidates. Ohio Media Spectrum 50 No. 1 Fall 2007.

Lance, Keith Curry (2001) Proof of the Power: Quality Library Media Programs Affect Academic Achievement. MultiMedia Schools September 2001.
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Instructional Leader I Believe Student

Words: 866 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49606680

Once a reasonable decision has been arrived upon, I must take on the role of the leader who ensures that it is implemented.

In order to do this, it will be my role to confer with my colleagues to determine if the change is being implemented, how it is affecting the faculty and students, and what other changes can be made to better accommodate this primary change. Furthermore, it will be my role to defend the change when others may question it, in addition to listening to the concerns that they have, many of which may be valid. Finally, as a leader responsible for change, I have the task of evaluating the changes that have taken place, determining by the facts, with others, if the change was truly beneficial or should be repealed or altered.

Thus, while change is often difficult, and even more often necessary, it is the responsibility…… [Read More]

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Enhancing Teacher-Student Connectedness an Increasing

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72670701



Persistence: Students that received long-term contact with teachers were more likely to foster feelings of belonging. The persistent contact acted as encouragement which promoted student motivation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Teachers that continually worked with students were sending nonverbal messages affirming their belief in the students. Edgar & Johnson (1995) found counselors were more successful when students perceived them as trusting and helpful. Actions that earned counselors the respect of the students were: demonstrating continual interest in the students, doing favors to show care, and by being respectful and courteous in return to the students (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). According to Wheatley (2002), teacher persistence was especially beneficial for students who had low self-expectations and whom others viewed with lower expectations. Teacher persistence has been noted to promote higher expectations among their students (Wheatley, 2002).

Fairness: Edgar & Johnson (1995) cited findings that encouraged schools to review their school rules…… [Read More]

Literature Review- Scholarly examination on the subject of student-teacher relationships shows only marginal and very sporadic accounts within the educational field prior to 1980. Edgar & Johnson (1995) suggested using relationship building strategies that have been approved by three federally financed prevention programs for middle school and high school youth for promoting teacher-student connectedness. Strategies presented were: maintaining persistence, establishing fairness procedures, and increasing student affiliation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995).

Persistence: Students that received long-term contact with teachers were more likely to foster feelings of belonging. The persistent contact acted as encouragement which promoted student motivation (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Teachers that continually worked with students were sending nonverbal messages affirming their belief in the students. Edgar & Johnson (1995) found counselors were more successful when students perceived them as trusting and helpful. Actions that earned counselors the respect of the students were: demonstrating continual interest in the students, doing favors to show care, and by being respectful and courteous in return to the students (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). According to Wheatley (2002), teacher persistence was especially beneficial for students who had low self-expectations and whom others viewed with lower expectations. Teacher persistence has been noted to promote higher expectations among their students (Wheatley, 2002).

Fairness: Edgar & Johnson (1995) cited findings that encouraged schools to review their school rules to ensure that the discipline procedures supported equal treatment for all students. By treating all students the same, in regards to discipline matters, demonstrated a sense of caring across all individual students' backgrounds (Edgar & Johnson, 1995). Regardless of ethnic or socioeconomic background, all students appreciated the core value that fairness be practiced by all school staff. Students quickly observed and perceived adult responses and made judgments as to whether or not they were
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Goal of Indiana Students Reading

Words: 3549 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44891359



Clickers/esponses Phonics Lesson

Phonics Long Vowel - Silent e Lesson Plan for Special Education

Objectives:

Students will recognize and say words that follow the c-v-c-e and v-c-e rule where the first vowel is a long vowel and the final e is silent. By using the Clickers/esponses as a classroom game they will utilize them after hearing the correct sounds.

Students with the will be able to spell and write out some basic long vowel words that have c-v-c-e and v-c-e spelling patterns and will use the Clickers/esponses when they hear the right sound.

About the Concept:

There are several regular long vowel spelling patterns in the English language. The c-v-c-e pattern (consonant-vowel-consonant-final e) is a long vowel spelling pattern which occurs quite frequently in early reading and spelling. Essentially, the phonics rule for this design mentions that when a vowel and final e are separated by a single consonant, the…… [Read More]

References:

Indiana Standards. (2010, March 3). Retrieved from Learniing Connection:  https://learningconnection.doe.in.gov/Standards/About.aspx?art=11 

Classroom Resources. (2012, September 5). Retrieved from ReadWritethink:  http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/ 

Elementary K-5 Writing Curriculum. (2012, September 5). Retrieved from Melrose Public Schools: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:aLFi5i1eLl4J:www.melroseschools.com/lincoln/MPS_Writing_Curriculum_K_5.pdf+writing+curriculum+for+elementary&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShGXpwCDU3mdB2rQVO2e3Dav6AgQn-3Ng2vDjsDa_f50Pd5k8wDn4zmQH2cTwV3P7kAA2v9zu

Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests® Online. (2012, September 5). Retrieved from Online reading test: http://www.riversidepublishing.com/products/gmrtOnline/index.html
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Education Student Accountability After Reviewing

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39622395

Demonstrations might comprise doing model problems or offering a model finished at the stage of performance anticipated. The structures supplied may be in the shape of grading criterion, rubrics, or exhibited assignment actions. Cognitive modeling is supportive in supplying learning and problem solving strategies to students. It comprises the teacher going through the processes while carrying out a task. Providing a model showing what to do and how to do it has been successful. This is predominantly useful for assignments that have multiple parts or for coursework that involve new content or a new intensity of complexity. A model may be one done by the teacher or one done by another student. It is important to include both affirmative, what to do and pessimistic, what not to do illustrations, so that both ends of the spectrum can be seen. In this case the teacher walks through many of the segments…… [Read More]

References

Evertson, Carolyn. (n.d.). Fostering Student Accountability for Classroom Work. Retrieved February 24, 2011, from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/case_studies/ICS-004.pdf
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Teaching Styles Achievement Teaching Styles and

Words: 1533 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46855853

Students that have adapted, whethe it is fo cultual easons o because an anothe style was bette suited fo the subject, may continue to show highe achievement even in futue classooms that do not implement the teaching styles that have been found to be ideal fo achievement levels. Futue eseach should also look to see if teaching styles beyond the ecommendations of No Child Left Behind can acquie the impovement in achievement NCLB seeks.

Refeences

Bouque J., Bouchamma, Y., & Laose, F. (2010). Aboiginal Students' Achievement in Science Education: The Effect of Teaching Methods. The Albeta Jounal of Educational Reseach, 56(1), 57-71.

Cabo, M. (2009). Match the Style of Instuction to the Style of Reading. Phi Delta Kappan, 90(5), 373-378.

Mogan, H. (2010). Impoving Schooling fo Cultual Minoities: The Right Teaching Styles Can Make a Big Diffeence. Educational Hoizons, 88(2), 114-120.

Payne-Tsoupos, C. (2010). No Child Left Behind: Disincentives to…… [Read More]

references for teaching styles matter in academic achievement: scientific and practical implications. Educational Psychology, 28(6), 615-625.
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Learning Styles and College Students

Words: 4864 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64521808

Community Colleges in America

In 1983 and 1984, a dozen major reports on the United States' schools were published. All stressed the need for "excellence" in education. These reports are the subject of: Excellence in Education: Perspectives on Policy and Practice. The reports pertaining to higher education were published by The BusinessHigher Education Forum, and saw higher education as "unable to train skilled managers and technicians that they believed industry needed." (Altbach 32) These reports essentially claim that student achievement has declined at technical schools because schools "do not demand enough of their students, do not apply stiff criteria for promotion, do not test students enough, and particularly in high school, provide students with too many choices about what subjects they study." (Altbach 32) These reports are somewhat dated in that they compare American students with Japanese students and focus on technical proficiency vs. The intuitive grasp of problems and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Altbach, Philip G., Gail P. Kelly, and Lois Weis, eds. Excellence in Education: Perspectives on Policy and Practice. Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1985.

Baker, George A., Judy Dudziak, and Peggy Tyler, eds. A Handbook on the Community College in America: Its History, Mission, and Management. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994.

Diaz, David P., and Ryan B. Cartnal. "Students' Learning Styles in Two Classes Online Distance Learning and Equivalent On-Campus." College Teaching 47.4 (1999): 130-135.

Miller, Richard I., Charles Finley, and Candace Shedd Vancko. Evaluating, Improving, and Judging Faculty Performance in Two-Year Colleges. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 2000.
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Parental Involvement and Student Academic Achievement

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39934806

Parent Involvement and Student Achievement

Parental Involvement and Student Academic Achievement

TA administration and staff believe schools are seeing a decrease in parental involvement as students enter high school. Research conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) Dropout Prevention Resource Guide (2008) has demonstrated the positive effects of parental involvement in schools.

Parental involvement in the eighth grade had a strong positive effect on the grade point average of 10th graders (Keith, T.Z., Keith, Quirk, Sperduto, Santillo, & Killings, 1998). In contrast, Balen and Moles (1994) and Hurst (2002) suggest when parents have a positive attitude regarding education and demonstrate trust that their children can do well, children perform better in school. However, parental involvement tends to decrease as students become older (p. 3).

Problem Statement

Historical and current studies have investigated the impact of parental involvement and student achievement. Diverse studies have considered how well students perform academically…… [Read More]

On a much larger sample of children (6,400 Americans, 14-18 years old) (Steinberg, 1992) conducted within the same two years that the previous researchers had started their study (1987-1988), Steinberg et al. (1992) found that parental involvement is more likely to promote adolescent school success as long as this academic involvement occurred in the context of an authoritative home environment.

This study was structured so as to examine long-term parenting style, including parental academic involvement with school performance in a sample of high school youth. Nine high schools from Wisconsin and North California were used in this study (Steinberg, 1992). Diversity was achieved as far as possible between different communities, ethnic population, family structures, and socioeconomic status levels. Self-report surveys were filled out by the students on two days of survey administration during the schools years of 1987-1988 and of 1988-1989 (Hill, 2004). In this case, I agree with the emphasis on self-reporting but the analytical framework, again, needs to be much stronger for truly measuring student perceptions as that is where the core of the mechanisms emerges.

The standard active consent form for ethical procedures was not used here since studies have shown that it would screen out individuals with possibly disengaged parents and it was precisely these individuals whom the researchers wished to include. Their procedure, therefore, was to request active consent from adolescents and passive consent from parents
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School Climate Student Morale Technology

Words: 1632 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23147789

It is our belief that such integration will provide reciprocal benefits. Learners will more fully understand information technologies in the process of applying them across the curriculum and their understanding of other curriculum areas will be similarly enriched as they work to apply it skills in those contexts. Furthermore, there is a need to ensure that people understand the connections between information technologies and the other skills they attain in school, skills they use in work, and in everyday life.

Findings of the Initial Literature eview Phase of the esearch

There exists a lack of technological integration which is noted at all levels of the educational forum as being one that is detrimental to the future of the student if not adequately addressed. The smaller schools appear to be providing better instruction and 'care' of their students as well as better technological instruction and overall better outcomes in terms of…… [Read More]

References

Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy: A Report of the International ICT Literacy Panel educational testing service. Online available at http://www.ets.org/research/ictliteracy/ictreport.pdf

Berkowitz, Bob (2001) Research Study: The Big6 ™ and Student Achievement - Report of an Action Research Study. Online available at http://www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id=11&page=2.

The Importance of Contemporary Literacy in the Digital Age: A Response to Digital Transformation: A Framework for Information Communication Technologies (ICT) Literacy http://www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id=157

Cotton, Kathleen (1996) School Size, School Climate and Student Performance
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Education for Hispanic Students in

Words: 1774 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66130596

colostate.edu/guides/research/casestudy/pop2a.cfm.

3. Hispanic, White Communities Forge Ties in Alabama (2003) a UA Center for Public Television and Radi9o Production. Online available at:

4. McDade, Sharon a. (2002) Definition of a Case Study. Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning - North Carolina State. Online available at http://www.ncsu.Edu/fctl/Programs/Instructional- Development/Teaching _Materials / CaseStudies/Materials / Case studyDefintion.pdf# search =%22 CASE%20STUDY % 3A%20DEFINIT ION%20OF %22.

5. UAB Wins $389,000 in Grants to Help Teachers Educate Non-English Speaking Children (200) UAB Media Relations. 27 Nov 200. Online available at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=46333.

6. English Language Development and Multicultural Education (2005) University of Alabama. Berkeley University Online available at http://crede.berkeley.edu/tools/directory2-/PDF/esl.pdf#search=%22Alabama%3A%20Elementary%20ESL%20SERVICES%22.

7. English as a Second Language (ESL) (2004) Baldwin County Public Schools; Bay Minette, Alabama. Online available at http://www.bcbe.org/Default.asp?DivisionID='824'&DepartmentID='958'.

8. UAB Wins $389,000 in Grants to Help Teachers Educate Non-English Speaking Children (200) UAB Media Relations. 27 Nov 200. Online available at http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=46333.

9. Alabama (2006) KYTESOL Newsletter Vol.…… [Read More]

11. Alabama: Featured Facts (2005) From the SREB Factbook on Higher Education. Online available at http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Mb3MWbM-0b4J:www.sreb.org/main/EdData/FactBook/2005StateReports/Alabama05.pdf+Alabama+Hispanic+education&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=6

12. Alabama Education Policy Primer: Chapter 2 Achievement (2005) Education Foundation - Online available at; http://www.aplusala.org/primer/ch2.asp

Education for Hispanic Students in the Elementary Schools of Alabama
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Parental Involvement and School Achievement

Words: 1393 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70499390

(Bennet 1996)

Negative Factors

The Journal of School Health reported in February 2001 that according to the National Education Goals, every child will start school ready to learn. However, this is unfortunately not always the case because families are not ready to deliver that child prepared for school. Specifically, those without proper socioeconomic support will have conditions outside of the classroom that will lead to an increased chance for academic failure. In communities where social services are provided that might make parental involvement more positive for elementary school students, parents are often unaware of the availability of these services. Additionally, parents may be less likely to participate in their child's schooling because of their own negative school experiences and lack of trust for the school staff. "During parenting programs, parents often described a perceived lack of communication and respect from the teachers, and the teachers often expressed similar frustrations. Staff…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beale, a.V., & Ericksen-Radtke, M.M. (2001, September)

Preparing students with learning disabilities for college: pointers for parents. (Elementary to Middle School: Part 1). The Exceptional Parent, v31 i9 p64(4).

Bennet, D. (1996, April) Should parents be involved in all school decisions? Yes. NEA Today, v14 n8 p31(1).

Browning, S., McMahon, B, & Rose-Colley, M. (2001, February)
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Factors Affecting Student's Adaptation to Learning Environments

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51636161

Transitioning and Student Wellbeing

Integration, Wellbeing, and Success of Transitioning of Students Background

Migration is a common phenomenon for many families around the globe. When a family moves, children often face the challenges of adapting to the behavior, culture, and requirements of the new school (Heinlein & Shinn, 2000). Significant evidence shows that the effects of moving affect students and teachers moving to a new school more than it does for the receiving students and teachers. However, those affected by changes in the learning environment are more resilient and can adapt easily to the new environment than their parents and teachers. The influence of mobility on the performance of the students has been an area of focus with a history that dates back to the beginning of World War II.

Significant evidence shows conflicting results on the effect mobility have on the performance of students, with some postulating it reduces…… [Read More]

References

Franke, T.M., & Hartman, C. (2003). Student mobility: how some children get left behind. The Journal of Negro Education, 72(1), 1-5.

Gruman, DH, Harachi, T.W., Abbott, R.D., Catalano, R.F., & Fleming, C.B. (2008). Longitudinal effects of student mobility on three dimensions of elementary school engagement. Child Development, 79(6), 1833-1852

Hattie, J. (2009) Making learning visible: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-analyses Relating to Achievement. London: Routledge

Heinlein, L.M., & Shinn, M. (2000). School mobility and student achievement in an urban setting. Psychology in the Schools, 37(4), 349-357.
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Special Needs Students High Stakes

Words: 1060 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19935449



hile some suggest that high-stakes testing is an inadequate way of measuring the academic achievement and learning of most students, many also agree that high-stakes testing has severe disadvantages for special education students. Kymes points out that high-stakes testing may be a discriminatory assessment method for special needs students, placing an "unfair burden" on these students. The scholar argues that testing plans cannot be created for each and every student, and even when they can, these testing plans are not always put into practice (Kymes). In addition, Ralabate notes the importance of finding alternate testing methods that allow students with disabilities to perform to their highest ability.

Determining that high-stakes testing is not a correct method of assessment for special needs students, however, is just half of the task at hand. In fact, significant information exists to argue that students with disabilities, in addition to schools, can be seriously harmed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fact Sheet: No Child Left Behind. 8 January 2002. The White House. 19 November 2008. http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/01/20020108.html

Kymes, Nancy. "The No Child Left Behind Act: A Look at Provisions, Philosophies, and Compromises." Journal of Industrial Teacher Education. 41.2 (2004) 19 November 2008. http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JITE/v41n2/kymes.html

Marlow, Ediger. Assessment and High Stakes Testing. Speech, 2001. Educational

Resource Information Center. ED449234.
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Best Practices for Students Diagnosed

Words: 4937 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57499707

(Thompson, Morse, Sharpe and Hall, 2005, p.40)

The work of Vaughn, Levy, Coleman and os (2002) entitled: "Reading Instruction for Students with LD and ED" published in the Journal of Special Education repots a synthesis of "previous observation studies conducted during reading with students with learning disabilities (LD) and emotional/behavioral disorders (ED)." (p.1) a systematic process of review of research conducted between 1975 and 2000 is stated to have "yielded a total of 16 studies 11 independent samples) that met all preestablished criteria." (Vaughn, Levy, Coleman and os, 2002, p. 1) Finding from the study include: (1) There was substantial time allocated for reading instruction, though the time varied based on whether students were in special education or general education or both; (2) students were provided more individual and group instruction in special education; (3) the quality of reading instruction was low, overall, with excessive time allocated to waiting and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fletcher, Jack M. (2002) Researchers support early intervention for all children

Drummond, Kathryn (2005) About Reading Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, and Reading Difficulties. Reading Rockets. 2005. Online available at http://www.readingrockets.org/article/639

Mastropieri, Margo and Graetz, Janet (2003) Implementing Research-Based Reading Interventions to Improve Access to the General Education Curriculum

Lazarus, Belinda Davis and Callahan, Thomas (2000) Attitudes Toward Reading Expressed by Elementary School Students Diagnosed with Learning Disabilities. Reading Psychology 21: 281-282. Copyright 2002 Taylor & Francis. Online available at http://www.usm.maine.edu/~amoroso/edu621/4050957.pdf
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Overrepresentation of Minority Students With

Words: 1676 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80450440

This study has noted that educators are noting better methods to assist these students rather than placing them in special education classes which fail to assist these students in school or across the span of their lifetime endeavors.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Recommendations arising from this review of literature in this study include the recommendation that different methods be utilized in assisting culturally and linguistically diverse students in the school setting. Among these methods are those noted by Knotek (2003) and Craig, Hull, Haggart and Perez-Selle (2000) which involves educators and school counselors assisting in addressing the difficulties faced by these students in the school environment and which may include but are not limited to addressing the needs of students as well as their strengths through strategies of individualized behavior contracts, specialized counseling techniques and culturally appropriate reinforcements that serve to encourage positive behavior on the part of the culturally and linguistically diverse…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Coutinho, M.J. & Oswald, D.P. (1999). Ethnicity and special education research: Identifying questions and methods. Behavioral Disorders, 24, 66-73.

Oswald, D.P., Coutinho, M.J., Best, A.M & Singh, N. (1999). Ethnic representation in special education: The influence of economic demographic variables. Journal of Special Education, 32, 194-196.

Murtagh, Damien (2003) Investigating the Overrepresentation of Ethnic Minorities in Special Education. Graduate Studies. Online available at: www.lynchburg.edu/documents/GraduateStudies/Journal/MurtaghD.doc

U.S. Department of Education. (2000). Twenty-second annual report to Congress on the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Washington, DC: Author.
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National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and

Words: 1346 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36743909

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and the American College Personnel Association reports that in terms of today's school curriculum "knowledge is no longer a scarce or stable commodity. Especially in science, engineering, and technical fields, knowledge is changing so rapidly that the specific information may become obsolete before a student graduates and has the opportunity to apply it." (2004) There are more in the way of those providing knowledge as well as the many educational offerings for all ages of learning, and is reported to have "diversified the structures, purposes, and outcomes of education." (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and the American College Personnel Association, 2004) Not only is knowledge plentiful it is simultaneously inexpensive due to the Internet and has "created a broad space for competitive claims about the legitimacy and veracity of information." (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and the American College Personnel Association, 2004)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ganzel, Bill (2007) Education in Rural America. Wessel's Living History Farm. Retrieved from:  http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/life_12.html 

Hancock, L. (2011, September 9). Why Are Finland's Schools Successful. Retrieved from Smithsonian: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/Why-Are-Finlands-Schools-Successful.html?c=y&page=2

Learning Reconsidered: A Campus-Wide Focus on the Student Experience (2004) The National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and The American College Personnel Association. Jan. 2004. Retrieved from: http://www.myacpa.org/pub/documents/learningreconsidered.pdf

Mourshed, M. And Chijioke, C., and Barber, M. (2010) How the World's Most Improved School Systems Keep Getting Better. Education. Nov. 2010. McKinsey & Company. Retrieved from:  http://mckinseyonsociety.com/downloads/reports/Education/How-the-Worlds-Most-Improved-School-Systems-Keep-Getting-Better_Download-version_Final.pdf
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Joe ' a Young Student Whom I Observed

Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90579381

Joe,' a young student whom I observed while he was engaged in a music lesson. An exciting aspect of music education is that students often have an innate interest in the subject. It is a rare student who does not like some type of music. The challenge of musical education is to use students' love of popular music to motivate the children to practice what can seem like technical, boring exercises like scales. This is the only way students can learn to play more complex and higher-level music. However, this type of challenge is common to every teacher's experience. Teachers must use a student's innate interests to encourage the student to work hard in more formal, technical aspects of learning. For example, students might not enjoy grammar drills right away, but most students love storytelling.

By assigning simplified versions of popular songs to play, music teachers can use the child's…… [Read More]

References

Atherton, J.S. 2010. Learning and teaching; Constructivism in learning [Online] UK.

Accessed: http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/constructivism.htm

December 16, 2010.
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Public School Students Be Required

Words: 974 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2181121

This debate does not include the fact that peer pressure in many public schools causes families to spend much more on "street clothes" so that their kids are not embarrassed or bullied because they do not have the latest fashions. (a single pair of the least expensive GAP girl's jeans can run $30 -- two to three times the cost of uniform pants or skirt). It seems clear that the argument that public school uniforms are more expensive may be difficult to prove.

The second, and most often used, argument against school uniforms is that they stifle self-expression and inhibit individuality. These are normally arguments from parents of children who have not yet participated in a school uniform policy. Most parents, in my research, who have a child who goes to a public school with a uniform policy say that their child expresses their individuality and self-expression in many other…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Educationbug.org. "Public SChool Uniform Statistics." 2010. educationbug.org. 17 March 2010 .

LBUSD. "School Uniform Fact Sheet." 2010. Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD). 17 March 2010 .
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Application of a Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Words: 60754 Length: 230 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60817292

Pedagogic Model for Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Almost thirty years ago, the American federal government passed an act mandating the availability of a free and appropriate public education for all handicapped children. In 1990, this act was updated and reformed as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which itself was reformed in 1997. At each step, the goal was to make education more equitable and more accessible to those with special educational needs. During the last presidential term, the "No Child Left Behind" Act attempted to assure that individuals with disabilities were increasingly mainstreamed and assured of high educational results. All of these legislative mandates were aimed at insuring that children with disabilities were not defrauded of the public education which has become the birthright of all American children. The latest reforms to IDEA, for example, provided sweeping reforms which not only expanded the classification of special…… [Read More]

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Staff Faculty Development for Raising Achievement

Words: 1608 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66056476

Peers and staff at major universities will review information collected in order to test for reliability and validity. Follow up studies will be necessary in order to determine the future efficacy of the theory proposed.

esults

The researcher suggests that the results of the study will reveal the critical factors that are likely to impact student's success in the classroom with regard to multicultural education. From the results of the fieldwork the researcher proposes that several factors will need to be adopted by faculty and staff in order to improve student outcome in the classroom.

eferences

Banks, J.A. (2001). Cultural diversity and education: Foundations, curriculum and teaching. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Banks, JA, & Banks, C.A.M. (1995). Handbook of research on multicultural education.

New York: Macmillan.

Benz, C.. & Newman, I. (1998). Qualitative-quantitative research methodology:

Exploring the interactive continuum. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, p. 9.

Capella-Santana, N. (2003). "Voices…… [Read More]

References

Banks, J.A. (2001). Cultural diversity and education: Foundations, curriculum and teaching. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Banks, JA, & Banks, C.A.M. (1995). Handbook of research on multicultural education.

New York: Macmillan.

Benz, C.R. & Newman, I. (1998). Qualitative-quantitative research methodology:
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Alberta's Provincial Achievement Testing - Analysis and Critique

Words: 1596 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52608720

Alberta's Provincial Achievement Testing - Analysis and Critique

Achievement tests can generally be considered to be a way for the education system to gain a better understanding of how students accumulate information and of how effective teaching methods are. Also, these respective tests aim to encourage students to get actively involved in the learning process and to demonstrate their abilities. Alberta's educational system acknowledges limitations associated with achievement tests and thus collaborates with provincial programs of study. Through taking on such attitudes, educational institutes are able to have a more complex comprehension of how students reach to achievement tests and of how they can improve these respective tests. Even with the fact that the achievement tests proved to be successful in many ways, it is still difficult to determine whether or not they have an overall positive effect on Alberta's education system. Most controversies are owed to many teachers being…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Vlaardingerbroek, B, & Taylor, N. "Secondary School External Examination Systems: Reliability, Robustness and Resilience." (Cambria Press, 2009)

Thomas, K. "An Analysis of Alberta's First Nations, Metis, and Inuit School-Community Learning Environment Project." (ProQuest, 2008)

"Achievement testing fails independent review," Retrieved May 20, 2015, from http://www.teachers.ab.ca/Publications/ATA%20News/Volume%2032/Number%203/In%20the%20News/Pages/Achievement%20testing%20fails%20independent%20review.aspx

"Alberta Provincial Achievement Testing," Retrieved May 20, 2015, from http://www.education.alberta.ca/media/6413019/grade%206%20parent%20guide%202012-13.pdf
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Minimizing Bias and Student Diversity in Assessment

Words: 1458 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19434182

Abstract

No teacher can entirely avoid the realities of student standardized assessment. But teachers must make informed choices in the classroom in regards to how students are instructed, based upon individual student needs and awareness of student diversity. There are significant questions regarding the potential biases of many standardized tests, particularly in regards to historically discriminated-against racial, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Teachers must be aware of these questions and biases and act as advocates for their students on a schoolwide and statewide level to ensure fairness.

Ethical Standards in Assessment:
Minimizing Bias and Student Diversity in Assessment

Education is supposed to be a great social leveler. Unfortunately, many concerns have been raised regarding the ability of commonly-used educational assessment tools to provide unbiased information about all students, regardless of students’ demographic characteristics. Teachers must balance the need to prepare students for these highly pressured exam environments with the need for…… [Read More]

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Value of Feedback to Teachers and Students

Words: 1324 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12072431

Teacher Feedback in the Learning Process

Teacher feedback has traditionally been a normal part of the teacher-students relationship in the learning process. This is primarily because feedback is widely acknowledged as a significant part of the learning cycle. Despite the significance of teacher feedback in the learning process, few studies have focused on examining whether university teachers and students value feedback differently. Actually, teachers and students have often expressed their frustrations and dissatisfaction on how the feedback process is carried out. The frustrations and disappointment has in turn acted as a sign of the differences in how university teachers and students value feedback in different ways. In light of this fact as well as findings on student-centered research, it is quite evident that university teachers and students value feedback in different ways.

Importance of Teacher Feedback

As previously mentioned, teacher feedback has long been an important and usual component of…… [Read More]

References

Christenson, S.L., Reschly, A.L. & Wylie, C. (2012). Handbook of research on student engagement. New York, NY: Springer.

Rowe, A. (2010, July). The Personal Dimension in Teaching: Why Students Value Feedback. International Journal of Educational Management, 25(4), 343-360.

Spiller, D. (2009, February). Assessment: Feedback to Promote Student Learning. Retrieved from The University of Waikato website: http://www.waikato.ac.nz/tdu/pdf/booklets/6_AssessmentFeedback.pdf

Stenger, M. (2014, August 6). 5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback. Retrieved July 31, 2015, from  http://www.edutopia.org /blog/tips-providing-students-meaningful-feedback-marianne-stenger
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The Relationship Between Parental Involvement and Student Success

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52778704

Parental Involvement and Student Success: Article Review

Although parental involvement is usually encouraged by schools, its precise effects upon student achievement remains controversial. In the article, “A New Framework for Understanding Parental Involvement: Setting the Stage for Academic Success,” published in the RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, Harris and Robinson (2016) offer a new framework for understanding parental involvement to permit greater systematization in comparisons of studies; their framework is called stage setting, based upon the premise that, “Stage-setters create a life space—the parameters within which the actor’s performance occurs—that corresponds with the intended action” (Harris and Robinson, 2016, p.189). This article reflects the focus of the journal, which is to solicit peer-reviewed articles from academics from fields across multiple disciplines in the social sciences. According to the journal’s published guidelines, all academics within all fields can submit research, and multidisciplinary studies which incorporate multiple…… [Read More]

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Exams Are Not the Best Way to Measure Students Abilities

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88154825

Education

ecently, Harvard professors ceased giving final exams as part of their overall assessment of student performance (Strauss, 2010). In a radical transformation of official college policy, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences voted to eliminate exams and require professors who wish to administer them to file an application form. The reverse used to be true: exams were the norm and professors wishing to opt-out would have to ask for permission.

What has caused this startling turn of events? Evidence, for one. In Test Problems: Seven easons Why Standardized Tests Are Not Working, Sadker & Zittleman (n.d.) outline empirical evidence supporting a shift away from examinations as the primary measure of student success. Examinations do measure a certain type of achievement, but they should not be used as the only method of gauging student progress and performance. One of the core reasons cited by Sadker & Zittleman (n.d.) include student…… [Read More]

References

"How Should We Measure Student Learning? The Many Forms of Assessment," (n.d.). Edutopia. Retrieved online:  http://www.edutopia.org /comprehensive-assessment-introduction

Sadker, D. & Zittleman, K. (n.d.). Test Problems: Seven Reasons Why Standardized Tests Are Not Working " Excerpt from: Teachers, Schools, and Society: A Brief Introduction to Education p. 370-376."

Strauss, V. (2010). Harvard profs dropping final exams. The Washington Post. July 17, 2010. Retrieved online:  http://voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/learning/harvard-profs-giving-up-final.html
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leadership practice and'student'success

Words: 1215 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35847770

Introduction

This paper is mainly a narrative report of the model whereby we evaluate and contrast the evaluation instruction and also review the principals’ function in endorsing efficient schooling by concentrating on two elements: leadership practice and student success.

Both of these elements hold a number of essential components that frequently appear as independent factors in other evaluation models. For instance, whilst some techniques leave out stakeholder suggestions, one can perceive it as being proof of leadership practice. Similarly, the learner outcomes component includes numerous measures as well (New Leaders, 2012).

Whilst there's substantial debate concerning the “right” weights for the two elements (and modest research-centered proof to aid a specific group of weights), one can assume that outcomes and practice are equally essential and that success ought to be according to advancement and efficiency in the two fields. So, one can suggest a well-balanced strategy (New Leaders, 2012).

Leadership…… [Read More]

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Increasing Number of Students in Special Education

Words: 10876 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30150873

Special Education

Since the introduction of PL-142 the Special education system has received both praise and criticism. Special Education Programs are an essential component to our educational system. The current special education system has aided many people but improvements are desperately needed as rates of enrollment increase and the number of special education teachers' decrease. The growth in the number of special education students is the topic of conversation among educators all across the country.

The purpose of this investigation is to discuss the increase in the American special education population. We will discuss the factors that have contributed to the increase including; the effect of PL-142 on the growth of the special education population early identification of special needs, the additional conditions that qualify students for special education, the placement of low achieving students in special education programs, accountability reforms, pressure from parents, the disproportionate amount of minorities that…… [Read More]

References

Digest of Education Statistics. (2001) U.S. Department of Education.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5001314786

Educators Should Require Evidence. (1999). Phi Delta Kappan, 81(2), 132. Retrieved May 30, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Presidents Commision on Revitalizing Special Education. 2002. United States Department of Education. Retrieved May 28, 2003, from.  http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/assessment/Pres_Rep.pdf
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Grade Level 3rd the Student

Words: 2545 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51521972

Although these students are very active learners, they also enjoy reading silently and time for their own thinking. The students enjoy participating in sports, dancing, and singing.

Luis

Luis (not his real name) is a bright, outgoing 3rd grade boy. After speaking with Mrs. Jones, I learned he has been in the United States since the end of 1st grade. During the (approximately) two years Luis has lived in the United States, he has gone back to Mexico for extended periods. Luis is verbal and is not shy. He can speak fairly well, but struggles with some English. The push in services Luis receives is from a paraprofessional who has had some ESL training. The Para comes in twice a day to work with Luis. In addition, Mrs. Jones has taken the proactive approach of labeling "everything" in the room as well as partnering Luis with strong students.

Lesson Plan…… [Read More]

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Co-Teaching Collaborative Teaching Model Benefits Students Socially

Words: 852 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54145620

Co-Teaching (Collaborative Teaching Model) Benefits Students Socially, Academically or Behaviorally.

Co-teaching or collaborative teaching is a method of delivery that involves delivering instruction to students in a diverse environment. Typically two or more teachers are employed in a co-teaching classroom. At this point in time the literature available on co-teaching suggests that co-teaching may have positive effects on students, particularly from a social and academic viewpoint. However all of the authors surveyed suggested that further systematic and empirical studies must be explored to fully examine the benefits or negative effects co-teaching has on the classroom.

Murawski & Swanson (2001) conduct a meta analysis to synthesis data-based articles related to co-teaching. Specifically the researchers intent is to examine the effects co-teaching has on the general and special education personnel and students. In particular the professionals show interest in finding new methods for increasing teacher efficiency for meeting the needs of students…… [Read More]

References:

Austin, V.L. (2001). "Teachers' beliefs about co-teaching." Remedial and Special

Education, 22(4): 245

Gerber, P.J. & Popp, P.A. (2000). "Making collaborative teaching effective for academically able students: Recommendations for implementation and training." Learning Disability Quarterly, 23(3): 2000

Murawski, W.W., & Swanson, H.L. (2001). "A meta-analysis of Co-teaching research."
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Divide Breaching the Student Affairs-Faculty

Words: 300 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35991890

45), it is probable that teaching faculty are more focused on their specialization than seeking to develop students as a whole or focusing on non-academic growth. This is not to say that teaching faculty are unconcerned about student achievement, but rather it is probable that they see this as the job of student affairs personnel, while their job is to focus on the development of the students as scholars. When teaching faculty engage with student affairs personnel on such relevant issues as academic integrity. Such models can occur when both faculty and student affairs personnel are aware of the active learning component and the personal group of a student as an integral part of the university's…… [Read More]

Breaching the Student Affairs-Faculty Divide

According to Magdola (1999), active learning is one of the more important institutions in a college education. Active learning means that students are able to bring together the aspects of their personal and academic lives. Magdola (1999) writes, "To make effective arguments, decisions, and judgments, a student must reflect on her own and others' views and integrate them into informed perspectives and understandings" (pg. 23). Thus, it is the job of the student affairs personnel to engage in a discourse with teaching faculty regarding active learning. However, Magdola (1999) also writes that entering such a discussion can be challenging. Indeed, the divide between teaching faculty and student affairs personnel is something of popular lore. While this divide exists, addressing why it is there and what can be done about it is up to speculation.

Although Dalton (1999) writes that "recent national reports on education and society have been highly critical of the neglect of values in undergraduate education and have called for renewed attention to the central role of character and civic education in colleges and universities" (pg. 45), it is probable that teaching faculty are more focused on their specialization than seeking to develop students as a whole or focusing on non-academic growth. This is not to say that teaching faculty are unconcerned about student achievement, but rather it is probable that they see this as the job of student affairs personnel, while their job is to focus on the development of the students as scholars. When teaching faculty engage with student affairs personnel on such relevant issues as academic integrity. Such models can occur when both faculty and student affairs personnel are aware of the active learning component and the personal group of a student as an integral part of the university's goals and models of student achievement.
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Planning Assessments for Students

Words: 7600 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 907095

classroom assessment, a teacher determines his or her current point within the instructional sequence of a unit of study and identifies the student academic learning goals to measure.

"Select one class, a content area, and a unit of study to work with as you complete this performance task. Respond to the prompts below about the unit of study and its assessment."

Grade Level

Content Area: Math:

Grade level: 5 Content area: Mathematics Subject matter: _Graphs, Functions and Equations

"List the state-adopted academic content standards or state-adopted framework you will cover in this unit."

Graphs, Function Probability and statistics, and Equation: Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability:

1.1: Arranges the raw data to plot graph and interprets the meaning of the data to produce information from the graph.

1.2: Understands the strategy to produce pair correctly .

Functions and Equations:

1.1: Uses the information collected from the equation or graph to answer…… [Read More]

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Factors Affecting the Retention of Students in Community Colleges

Words: 3592 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2622452

Education - Theory

Addressing etention Issues in Community CollegesUsing Transition and Ecological/Environment Theory

Many community colleges face serious retention issues that affect student performance, persistence, and learning. The rationale employed in identifying alternative assessments involves overriding standardized test validities and predictive reliability issues. However, there are concerns regarding the derived holistic understanding among student outcomes. The goal of providing college educators through alternative supplemental approaches facilitate standardized testing of various evaluative measures as introduced. The issues of student self-assessment and social and value-added assessments, evaluations, and personal growth portfolios within community colleges had increased. The design suggests an institution of the writing and implementation of parallel outcomes in the studies are linked to different fundamental questions serving as subjects of confirm relevance to campus dynamics and student success.

The levels involved in making the students leave or stay are informative points on student engagement. This includes social and academic connection…… [Read More]

References

Braxton, J.M., & Doyle, W.R. (2013). Rethinking College Student Retention. New York: John Wiley & Sons,

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1994). Ecological Models of Human Development. International Encyclopedia of Education, vol. 3, 2nd ed., 131-214.

Evans, N.J., Forney, D.S., & Guido-DiBrito, F. (2010). Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

Forney, E., & DiBrito, G. (1998).Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice. pp. 111-114.