Canada Cultural Sovereignty Term Paper

Download this Term Paper in word format (.doc)

Note: Sample below may appear distorted but all corresponding word document files contain proper formatting

Excerpt from Term Paper:

Canada Cultural Sovereignty

The weight of globalization on the national media techniques has activated a considerable range of research and different analysis. Canada being one of the nations has its policy makers and scholars concerned on the media's impact on not only its politics, but culture and religion too. The major reason is the proximity of Canada to the United States. It is also the world's greatest exporter of cultural produce with two distinct media audiences that are English and French. However, there is need to protect any nation's cultural values.

Globalization being the emergence of multinational communication systems with a worldwide free market in cultural products raises many political concerns. Today in Canada, the potential erosion of long life policies that protected cultural domestic production is the topic that is most talked of. English and French languages are vital to the future of Canada hence rarely studied. These two languages weakly linked to each other only complicate the attempts to respond to the crisis of worldwide communication systems and an international culture. In Quebec, the French media prevails, making the place modern, and ignoring all the cultural, political, and social developments experienced in the other parts of the country. An identity crisis preoccupies their minds, and their traditional religious identity eroded. The external forces and local divisions raise the questions of how Canada can build a preservation of a common cultural space where public issues discusses, and all communities represented. Globalization and the two language groups necessitate Canadian Communication Policy for future reasons.

The concerns caused by the hypothetical assumptions of the relationship between the nation and state raises concerns. Although ethnicity and language are the major causes of Canada's sense of identity, the focus of policy analysis is the notion of a political or civic nationality. The fact that a nation is a 'multi-purpose communication network' by Balthazar (2006, p.102), is normally accepted in Quebec and Pan-Canadian nationalists. The foundation of this communication network remains open. It may include mutual values and civilization, or language and ethnicity, like in the more traditional ideas of nationality. It may also include inertia or common economic interests. In this replica, the key pointer of a community is the fact that insiders converse more often, and on more issues within themselves than with the outsider (Deutsch, 1966). Karl Deutsche formulates those nationalities marks off from one another through communications. Canada has the problem against the flow of north to south transactions in order to maintain itself as a political and economic unit. Due to the historical accident that builds a French-speaking zone, a gap is build that compensated in 1960s through an effective system of elite adaptation. Through the representatives from the two groups, disputes were resolved, and common goals reached through negotiations.

The elite accommodation communication system weakens through a variety of factors. Firstly, there is the spread of modern mass communication and the education. The issue of interaction between the two language speaking communities enhanced the connection to the United States and the wide world as a whole. The changes made the Canadian communities open wider to the influences that came with globalization. However, this seemed to undermine the cultural elite accommodation. The American influence plays a big role in the decline of esteem to elites and has increased prospect of the popular sovereignty. 'The Charter of Rights and Freedom' is an institutionalized phrase of this ethnic change and public dialogue enfolding the court cases, and helps change the expectations. The many immigrants to Canada and the duality of both English and French make elite accommodation considerably difficult. The developments undermined the privileged accommodation without giving them an alternative populist. Canada lacks a strong unifying myth leaving it vulnerable to outside cultural influences, whether from United States or other countries.

Communication in the political arena has brought concerns among the Canadians because of the creation and preservation of the public spaces within which national issues are debated and later resolved. Easton relates the key assumption of a stable democracy requires citizens to share basic beliefs and values to ensure dispute resolution methods in the political arena is legitimate, and general vocabularies in public speech applies. The wider the apathy in regards to belonging in a country, the lesser the citizens will to participate during the democratic procedures, and the more risks in country disintegration (Neilson 83). However, this has not reflected during voter turnouts. Perhaps it manifests in constitutional exhaustion, and hopelessness in the prospects of any durable solutions.

The concept of effective democratic community makes Canadians inhibit separate distinct media worlds and consumers of imported cultural products. The Canadian producers manage only 20% of Canada's cultural produces markets unlike other industrialized countries, which control 80% (Audrey 1994). However, the English broadcasting is known since domestic entertainment is not popular like imported programs (Tracey & Redal 1995). The English speakers spent only 28% of time in watching domestic programs, while the French speakers spent 67% of their time. Any country that does not engage the basic tools in conducting routine debates on their airwaves, is in a dilemma since it diminishes the ability of each group to adjudicate their affair or help in national development (Starowicz 95). The tools are available but the government has turned a deaf year to its citizens.

It is notable how the two language speakers in Canada live in two different media worlds. This shows from a large text that includes books, popular music, and this brings the conclusion that its cultural products divides into two. Quebec Networking was for all purpose and that is why the majority watch local production. The English speakers preferred watching the American productions.

Dual shooting whereby programs present in both languages may assist in protecting cultural sovereignty. CBC is one channel that tries to use both languages although it hasn't been very successful. Applying joint productions as well as bilingual foreign correspondences may make the viewers more interested in the local production. However, the French-speaking viewers have stuck to the domestic programs, where they feel more represented than the English viewers. This means the government's efforts in promoting the country's identity are more successful in Quebec. Most people have viewed the government as playing part in the separation of the two language speakers.

The focus has been on the structural media issues and the viewer's ratings. The government should issue a detailed political analysis of the content in the two media worlds. More schoolwork should identify the works in literally fiction. More research on symbols and myths that re shown in the different media worlds should differentiate the two. In case the use of popular media has a significant attitude/political consequences, it is vital to learn more of the messages sent across and the reception. Fillion feels that Quebec's success on media is the relationship between the viewers and the milieu. This means that language plays a big role in maintain culture, and one wonders how further globalization will erode it.

The government can use censorship as a means of minimizing external influence. It should concentrate on advertizing its products to its viewers preaching the advantage of using local products. The effects on foreign production should program in order for the viewers to identify what is good.

Intergenerational communication accommodation has created a gap between the old and the young. This means that the younger generation hardly learns from the old. The ripple effect is that the cultural morals hit a dead end because the information is lacks continuity. The government should set legal public policies that will protect the young people from the misuse and abuse of modern technology from any media including televisions, computers, or newspapers. The young generation is responsible for the future of the cultural values, hence they should embrace it positively other than negatively.

The cultural environment should be re-packaged. This may involve digitalizing the material or information for media projection. A lot of the culture is held physically and can not be transmitted through media. Most of it holds in the museums, and there is need for collective, programmed data to enable media to transit it. The government may be required to offer more and detailed Intelligent Technologies to the scholars to enable this. These lessons include documentation. All necessary data collected will then documented. Presentation is an area of consideration because the collected document digitalizes and later represented. Seminars regarding the same cultural values held easily projects on any media. The government should also offer legal protection for elusive cultural heritage. 'Every population holds its memories whether through songs, or culture. Canadians feel they were primarily French who were later invaded its like a shadow behind them that other people won't understand since they did not live in it' (Fitzgerald 1997 p.8).

Public and news affairs are popular for influencing the political discourse. This means news is a form of a cultural expression (Schudson 1995). It is hence important to closely watch and monitor the texts on news, and its meaning to…[continue]

Cite This Term Paper:

"Canada Cultural Sovereignty" (2013, April 02) Retrieved October 26, 2016, from

"Canada Cultural Sovereignty" 02 April 2013. Web.26 October. 2016. <>

"Canada Cultural Sovereignty", 02 April 2013, Accessed.26 October. 2016,

Other Documents Pertaining To This Topic

  • French English Relations in Canada in the 20th

    French-English Relations in Canada In the 20th century, Canada has two significant relationships in foreign policy -- one with the UK and one with the U.S.A. The UK essentially set Canada's foreign policy "during the decades following Confederation" -- a fact which tested Canadian loyalty and Canadian unity (since it was, number one, a policy that meant to look out for the best interests of the UK). In the latter half

  • Canadian Politics Canada Is a

    A head of state could be chosen by indirect election by parliament, as one example. This is similar to the current process, however, in the new process, the Governor-General would be made by provincial or federal legislatures as opposed to being selected by the Prime Minister and then formally appointed by the Queen. Another way to go would be to have the head of state chosen by indirect election by

  • Fgm Female Genital Mutilation Violence

    According to Amnesty International, the practice of FGM is performed on more than 2,000,000 women out of whom 600,000 are in Africa. (Kalev, 2004, p. 339) Rarely does FGM simply involve a symbolic small cut on the hood of the clitoris, as it misnomer Female Circuscision would imply. More often it involves clitoridectomy. This is anatomically equivalent to amputation of the penis. Clitoridectomy is often followed by a more

  • National Security the Canadian Government s

    The systems that were earlier adopted to enhance security deterrence were ignored in the post war era, leading to a paved way for international relations that included policy development and other positive security measures (Huebert 3). Measures taken by Canada after the war The military power existence was now fully diminished. The ancient paradigms, which based on military influence, were long gone, and many alternatives were realized, which better procedures and

  • Americans National Identity Rests Largely Upon Ethnic

    Americans' national identity rests largely upon ethnic kinshi common language. shared political ideals. religion. federal law. The American ideal of equality promotes the idea that all citizens should be equal in their standard of living. is fully consistent with individualism. does not include the idea that everyone is entitled to fair treatment under the law. has helped minority groups to achieve their goals. has always been fully implemented in U.S. history. The American political culture includes all of the following ideals except liberty. equality. self-government. individualism. economic

  • Diversity and or How Child Abuse in Handled in New York Compared...

    Diversity and Child Abuse Prevention Diversity and How Child Abuse in Handled in New York Compared to Other Countries There is developing debate regarding the suitable combination of programs and polices needed to react to concerns of child abuse and neglect. Child neglect and abuse hold significant effects for prospective health and mental health of a child. As a result, it is imperative to comprehend connections among different forms of maltreatment, family

  • Media in Other Countries Many

    In the Arab world, it can get that woman killed…literally. That is not to say that is the norm, but it's a commonly discussed and accepted precept with much (but notably not all) of the Arab sphere. Similarly, honor killings are considered acceptable, even with some people that have immigrated to countries that consider it cold-blooded murder. As for whether anything has changed in the recent past that might change

Read Full Term Paper
Copyright 2016 . All Rights Reserved