Who remained reach New Deal assistance Why politics 'shaped limits reform ability constituents demand assistance federal government's response demands

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resident Roosevelt's New Deal Program failed to do enough for those hit hardest by the Depression: Impoverished Afro-American and white citizens working in the rural areas of the U.S., the elderly, and the working class. There are several reasons why these constituents remained outside the reach of the New Deal program. First, there had been in general very little focus on the needs of these constituents. The New Deal created a state brokering the competing claims of numerous groups, hence named a "broker state" (see New Deal, p. 17). Competition in political and economic life increased tremendously. To an amount never seen before, workers, farmers, consumers, and others now able to press their demands on the federal government in the way that in the past had been available to the corporate world only, competed with each other (see New Deal, p. 17).

The New Deal set up numerous agencies to help impoverished white and black farmers, but in the long run they had been forced to move to the cities to become economically better off. Many members of the Roosevelt administration worked hard to ensure that Blacks received at least 10 % of welfare advance assistance payment which would eventually lead to some economic uplift. Nevertheless, the New Deal did not enough to undercut political segregation or change the second class political status of the black population in the South (see New Deal, p. 1, 19). As a result, there had only been very limited political impact on Blacks on the allocation of relief funds. In consequence, rural Afro-Americans received a disproportionate amount of monetary aid from the federal government and in contrast to the industrialist and middle class citizens in the cities had to endure suffered tremendously. From the perspective of rural Afro-Americans, the New Deal was a compilation of biased laws, failed relief programs and racism.

Early supporters but soon to be critics of the New Deal are quoted to see a further reason why the poor, the elderly, and the working class were widely kept out of the reach of the program in the fact that the Roosevelt administration had been "falling captive to American business interests" (see American President: Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Domestic Affairs, p. 1,…[continue]

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"Who Remained Reach New Deal Assistance Why Politics 'shaped Limits Reform Ability Constituents Demand Assistance Federal Government's Response Demands" (2011, August 14) Retrieved July 1, 2015, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/who-remained-reach-new-deal-assistance-why-51810

"Who Remained Reach New Deal Assistance Why Politics 'shaped Limits Reform Ability Constituents Demand Assistance Federal Government's Response Demands" 14 August 2011. Web.1 July. 2015. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/who-remained-reach-new-deal-assistance-why-51810>

"Who Remained Reach New Deal Assistance Why Politics 'shaped Limits Reform Ability Constituents Demand Assistance Federal Government's Response Demands", 14 August 2011, Accessed.1 July. 2015, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/who-remained-reach-new-deal-assistance-why-51810

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