Amazing Contributions of Blind Musicians Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

326). Likewise, Dagbovie (2005) points out that Ray Charles drew on black history for his inspiration during a period in American history when the "tradition of protest" had not yet been firmly established. Another biographer suggests that the musical genius of Ray Charles helped him reach a prominent place in American society where he could make a difference in the Civil Rights Movement: "James Brown fathered funk; Sly Stone raised it. Ray Charles' mastery of it all made America see beyond its blinding bigotry" (Dyson, 2005, p. 174).

Conclusion

The research showed that blind musicians can be either musical savants or musical prodigies, with the vast majority of professional performers representing the latter. If 100 people were asked to name a flower, most likely 99 would say "rose." Likewise, if asked to name some famous blind musicians, 99 out of 100 people will probably respond "Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles." The research also showed that these two individuals have contributed far more than just their musical talents to the American consciousness. In fact, just a few decades ago, segregation was in full force throughout many parts of the United States and "colored only" drinking fountains and restrooms were commonplace. The accomplishments of the Civil Rights Movement and the enacting legislation that changed things in America were facilitated in some part by the contributions of two blind musicians in particular, Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles, who performed during this critical formative years and were civil rights activists before it was considered cool or profitable.

References

Cooper, B.L. (1991). Popular music perspectives: Ideas, themes, and patterns in contemporary lyrics. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Dagbovie, P.G. (2005). Of all our studies, history is best qualified to reward our research. Black history's relevance to the hip hop generation. The Journal of African-American History, 90(3), 299.

Goldstein, D. (1998). Music institute for blind college-bound musicians. RE:view, 29(4), 163.

Haroutounian, J. (2000). The delights and dilemmas of the musically talented teenager. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 12(1), 3.

Monge, L. (2000). The language of Blind Lemon Jefferson: The covert theme of blindness. Black Music…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Cooper, B.L. (1991). Popular music perspectives: Ideas, themes, and patterns in contemporary lyrics. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press.

Dagbovie, P.G. (2005). Of all our studies, history is best qualified to reward our research. Black history's relevance to the hip hop generation. The Journal of African-American History, 90(3), 299.

Goldstein, D. (1998). Music institute for blind college-bound musicians. RE:view, 29(4), 163.

Haroutounian, J. (2000). The delights and dilemmas of the musically talented teenager. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 12(1), 3.

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