Civil War Even When The Term Paper

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Lee decided to run even before Sherman was able to come, and escaped from Petersburg. Grant was able to catch him at Appomattox, and then was the surrendered. There were 360,000 dead on the Union side and 260,000 dead on the Confederate side, but the union continued. This war made United States as a nation and a state. Earlier secession and state veto power had been disturbing the government from the beginning. (United States (History): The South Secedes) From here started Reconstruction, but that is another story. References

Coming of the Civil War: An Overview. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005

Encyclopedia: Bleeding Kansas. Retrieved at http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Bleeding-KansasAccessed on 26 May, 2005

Encyclopedia: Missouri Compromise. Retrieved at http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Missouri-CompromiseAccessed on 26 May, 2005

The Compromise of 1850....

...

Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): Bleeding Kansas. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html#s85Accessed on 26 May, 2005

United States (History): Changes in Slavery. Retrieved from: (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_14/United_States_(History).html#s74Accessed on 26 May, 2005

United States (History): The Dred Scott Case. Retrieved from: (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_17/United_States_(History).html#s188Accessed on 26 May, 2005

United States (History): The Kansas-Nebraska Act. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html#s85Accessed on 26 May, 2005

United States (History): The South Secedes. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_18/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Coming of the Civil War: An Overview. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005

Encyclopedia: Bleeding Kansas. Retrieved at http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Bleeding-KansasAccessed on 26 May, 2005

Encyclopedia: Missouri Compromise. Retrieved at http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Missouri-CompromiseAccessed on 26 May, 2005

The Compromise of 1850. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): Bleeding Kansas. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html#s85Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): Changes in Slavery. Retrieved from: (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_14/United_States_(History).html#s74Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): The Dred Scott Case. Retrieved from: (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_17/United_States_(History).html#s188Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): The Kansas-Nebraska Act. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_16/United_States_(History).html#s85Accessed on 26 May, 2005
United States (History): The South Secedes. Retrieved at (http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_1741500823_18/United_States_(History).html. Accessed on 26 May, 2005


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