Community Policing Traditionally, Law Enforcement Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

373.)

Effect of Community Policing On Crime Rates

Recent studies have shown that community policing, as a whole, has not been shown to result in lower crime rates. (Sozer, 2008, p. 184). Instead, studies have found that certain community policing activities, such as the retraining of police officers, are actually correlated with higher crime rates. (Sozer, 2008, p. 184). However, when looking at only large agencies in large cities, the study found that a problem-solving partnership is associated with lower violent crime rates. (Sozer, 2008, p.185). Sozer concludes that in more complex social environments, the importance of collaboration appears to yield a crime reduction effect. (Sozer, 2008, p.185).

Critique of Crime Rate Statistics

Although the results of Sozer's study are somewhat surprising, they are not a conclusive statement on the efficacy of community policing. Crime statistics suffer from a number of reliability and validity issues, which may have skewed the statistics in this study. Crimes which go unreported, known as the "dark figure of crime," are not registered in the Uniform Crime Reports and only partially registered in the National Crime Victims Survey. In this case of community policing, the increased interaction between community residents and police agencies may have caused typically unreported crimes to be reported.

Even if community policing has truly not had a significant effect on crime rates yet, there are other benefits to its implementation. Even its most ardent critics admit that community policing seems to be effective in reducing the fear of crime and in improving public relations. (Sozer, 2008, p. 184). This observation must not be underestimated, as reducing the fear of crime improves the quality of life in the community.

Conclusion

Police departments have come a long way from the traditional, reactive approach to policing. This comes from a recognition that crimes are often mere symptoms of larger environmental factors in a community, particularly socio-economic conditions. This recognition will not be a great shock for most people. However, the fact that the police force recognizes these factors is valuable in itself, and will go a long way to restoring public confidence in law enforcement.

Bibliography

Bureau of Justice Administration. (1994). Understanding community policing: A framework for action. Washington, D.C: The Bureau.

DeWitt, C.B. (1992). Community Policing in Seattle: A Model Partnership Between Citizens and Police. National Institute of Justice.

Bayley, DH (1991). Forces of order: Policing modern Japan. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Morabito, M.S. (September 02, 2010). Understanding community policing as an innovation: Patterns…

Sources Used in Document:

Bibliography

Bureau of Justice Administration. (1994). Understanding community policing: A framework for action. Washington, D.C: The Bureau.

DeWitt, C.B. (1992). Community Policing in Seattle: A Model Partnership Between Citizens and Police. National Institute of Justice.

Bayley, DH (1991). Forces of order: Policing modern Japan. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Morabito, M.S. (September 02, 2010). Understanding community policing as an innovation: Patterns of adoption. Crime and Delinquency, 56, 4, 564-587.

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