Corrections Probation and Parole Probation Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Not merging them can have monetary and societal consequences. One Oregon reporter notes, "Court, corrections and probation agencies have grown up with separate databases, separate offices and separate staffs in ways not conducive to a comprehensive, systematic approach to offender management" (Bishop D1). Because parole and probation agencies are often separate entities, they do not share information, such as databases, and because of this, problem offenders can fall though the cracks of the system and become lost or untraceable. In addition, combining these agencies saves public tax dollars, and makes them more effective in the process. These two departments traditionally do not get the same type and amount of financing as other correctional departments, and so, they often are understaffed and unable to effectively monitor all the people they need to monitor. This can be dangerous to the public safety if an offender is dangerous, is released into probation, and then is not monitored. When the public's safety is involved, it just makes sense to combine these departments to make them easier to run, more cost effective, and more efficient in their jobs.

While the duties of parole agents and probation officers does differ in some respects, they work for common goals, and it simply makes sense that the two functions should merge into one agency. There would be room for more agents, who would have a smaller caseload, and the parole board could oversee both functions. Splitting up the functions just adds a burden to the taxpayer and makes both agencies less effective because they can duplicate effort while they make not share valuable and even vital information. Separating these functions may have made sense in early correctional departments, but today, combining them simply makes more sense.

References

Bishop, Bill. "New Facility to Help Corrections Put Their Game Plan in Motion." The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR) 31 Mar. 2005: D1.

Jones, Justin. "Probation and Parole: The Savior of Corrections." Corrections Today Feb. 2003: 34+.

Posner, Richard A. "Developments in the Law: Alternatives to Incarceration."…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Bishop, Bill. "New Facility to Help Corrections Put Their Game Plan in Motion." The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR) 31 Mar. 2005: D1.

Jones, Justin. "Probation and Parole: The Savior of Corrections." Corrections Today Feb. 2003: 34+.

Posner, Richard A. "Developments in the Law: Alternatives to Incarceration." Harvard Law Review 111.7 (1998): 1863-1990.

Cite This Term Paper:

"Corrections Probation And Parole Probation" (2005, October 14) Retrieved May 31, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/corrections-probation-and-parole-probation-69788

"Corrections Probation And Parole Probation" 14 October 2005. Web.31 May. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/corrections-probation-and-parole-probation-69788>

"Corrections Probation And Parole Probation", 14 October 2005, Accessed.31 May. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/corrections-probation-and-parole-probation-69788

Advertisements