Criminal Behavior Theories Theory of Discussion Chapter

Excerpt from Discussion Chapter :

Leaders in society understand the need to resist putting unfair labels on people; this has been a positive trend over the recent past.

Feminist Theory: Feminist theories suggest, "…criminal justice decisions reflect male dominance and functioning to support patriarchy"; in short, the system is bias against women (Akers, 1999). This has changed society because women's liberation, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, have made it illegal to discriminate based on race, gender, religious affiliation or age.

Biosocial Theories: The risk entailed in criminal behavior is caused by a combination of environmental and biological dynamics (Vito, et al., 2006). Another aspect of this approach to criminology is to believe that personality traits, which are the result of biological forces inside the individual, can cause crime. Society puts criminals in prisons, but sociologists and psychologists strive to understand how biological and environmental factors factor in when people commit crimes. The change is a dramatic one from the days when lawbreakers were simply punished and/or removed from society through isolation. Individuals have a better chance for rehabilitation when professionals work with them one-on-one.

Life-Course Theories: this approach to criminality views lawbreaking as a "dynamic process" that is influenced by a myriad of individual characteristics, traits, and social interactions (Siegel, 2009). When a child is abandoned by his parents for example and spends his youth bouncing from foster home to foster home, later engaging in deviant behaviors, the role of that individual is then changed by his environment and the social interactions therein.

Works Cited

Akers, Ronald. (1999). Criminological Theories. Florence, KY: Taylor & Francis.

Burfeind, James, Burfeind, James W., and Bartusch, Dawn Jeglum. (2010). Juvenile

Delinquency: An integrated Approach. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Florida State University. (2007). Durkheim's Anomie. Retrieved August 22, 2011, from http://www.criminology.fsu.edu/crimtheory/week8.htm.

Gibson, Mary, Lombroso, Cesare, and Rafter, Nicole Hahn. (2006). Criminal Man. Durham, NC:

O'Connor, Tom. (2011). Austin Peay State University. Retrieved August 22, 2011, from http://www.drtomoconnor.com/1060/1060lect07.htm.

Payne, Brian K. (2005). Crime and Elder Abuse: An Integrated Perspective. Springfield, IL:

Charles C. Thomas Publisher.

Siegel, Larry J. (2009). Introduction to Criminal Justice. Florence, KY: Cengage Learning.

Vito, Gennaro F., Maahs, Jeffrey R., and Holmes, Ronald M. (2006). Criminology: Theory,

Research,…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Akers, Ronald. (1999). Criminological Theories. Florence, KY: Taylor & Francis.

Burfeind, James, Burfeind, James W., and Bartusch, Dawn Jeglum. (2010). Juvenile

Delinquency: An integrated Approach. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Florida State University. (2007). Durkheim's Anomie. Retrieved August 22, 2011, from http://www.criminology.fsu.edu/crimtheory/week8.htm.

Cite This Discussion Chapter:

"Criminal Behavior Theories Theory Of" (2011, August 24) Retrieved April 9, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/criminal-behavior-theories-theory-of-44153

"Criminal Behavior Theories Theory Of" 24 August 2011. Web.9 April. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/criminal-behavior-theories-theory-of-44153>

"Criminal Behavior Theories Theory Of", 24 August 2011, Accessed.9 April. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/criminal-behavior-theories-theory-of-44153