Criminal Statistics and Behavior Some Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

"Approximately 27.5% of college women reported experiences that met the legal criteria for rape," even though some of them were not necessarily aware that the actions to which they were subjected satisfied such a definition (Rape and sexual violence, 2013, NIJ).

According to the FBI, which defines violent crimes as "murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault," an "estimated 1,246,248 violent crimes occurred nationwide" in 2010 (Rape and sexual violence, 2013, NIJ). There is obviously a great deal of overlap between the characteristics of populations that commit sexual assault and violent criminals, due to this definition. It should also be noted that although persons who commit violent crimes are disproportionately male and young (the example of stereotypes being validated by statistics); whites commit more such crimes -- 54% vs. 45% versus African-Americans. Also, "numbers also vary widely depending on the crime, with blacks responsible for more murders and robberies (55% and 61% of these crimes, respectively) and whites committing more rapes and aggravated assaults (56% and 60%)" (Updegrave 1994). Proportions "also change with location: In the suburbs, whites commit 65% of the crime and blacks only 34%. In the cities, whites hold a thin 50% to 49% edge (Updegrave 1994).

It is also true that the majority of family violent offenders are male, although once again, as with rapes, family-based crimes tend to be underreported. "Among family violence offenders in state prisons in 1997 -- most were male (93%) 6 out of 10 were white, while about a quarter were black [and] about 80% were between ages 25 and 54" (Family violence statistics, 2002, BJS). This is another example of statistical overlap, given that violent criminals and sexual assailants may also be convicted for specifically domestic violations.

References

Bartol, C. & Bartol, a. (2007). Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach. Prentice Hall.

Family violence statistics. (2002). BJS. Retrieved:

http://bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fvs02.pdf

Hodgins, S. & Muller-Isberner, R. (Eds.). (2000). Violence, crime, and mentally disordered offenders: Concepts and methods for effective treatment and prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons

Rape and sexual violence. (2013). National Institute of Justice (NIJ). Retrieved:

http://www.nij.gov/topics/crime/rape-sexual-violence/welcome.htm

Rice, Marnie E.; Harris, Grant T. (1997). The treatment of mentally disordered offenders.

Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 3.1: 126-183.

Section 3: Common Characteristics of Sex Offenders. (n.d.). Center for Sex Offender

Management. Retrieved: http://www.csom.org/train/etiology/3/3_1.htm

Updegrave, Walter. (1994). You are safer than you think. CNN. Retrieved:

http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/moneymag_archive/1994/06/01/88911/

Violent crime. (2011). FBI. Retrieved:

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2010/crime-in-the-u.s.-2010/violent-crime

Sources Used in Document:

References

Bartol, C. & Bartol, a. (2007). Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach. Prentice Hall.

Family violence statistics. (2002). BJS. Retrieved:

http://bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fvs02.pdf

Hodgins, S. & Muller-Isberner, R. (Eds.). (2000). Violence, crime, and mentally disordered offenders: Concepts and methods for effective treatment and prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons

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