Fairness in Hiring and Promotion Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

All organizations and business have some form of ethical culture to carry out their goals, which cannot be inconsistent with the aims of utilitarianism. All organizations aim at the pleasure of achieving or creating something. This line of thought can be strictly infused into the awareness of employees during meetings or seminars. The goals of the theory may also be infused into new employees as part of their orientation. Existing employees may be promoted on the basis of their best contribution to organizational goals and the welfare of fellow employees. These are measurable criteria and a source of motivation to other employees.

The utilitarian theory necessarily states that it is an employee's duty to perform and behave in the best possible way to benefit the business, fellow employees, society and himself or herself. Consequently, he or she has the right to expect the same benefits from the organization, fellow employees, and society or community.

The utilitarian theory focuses on the greatest amount of happiness employees contribute to the ends of the enterprise and the welfare of other employees. By its nature, it treats persons as means to an end, which is pleasure. Distributive theory, on the other hand, focuses on the intrinsic worth or value of each employee, independently of what he or she contributes to the business or fellow employees. The utilitarian theory will be frustrated if a few employees cease to be selfless, which is the case in the real world. The distributive theory does more for the employee by insisting that he or she be viewed and treated as unique and separate from his performance and conduct. #

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Gilani, N. (2011). Utilitarianism in the workplace. eHow: Demand Media, Inc. Retrieved

on November 30, 2011 from http://www.ehow.com/info8785999_utilitarianism-workplace.html

Lamont, J. (2007). Distributive justice. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Stanford

University. Retrieved on November 30, 2011 from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/justice-distributive

Murdock, R. (2011). Some modern theories on workplace ethics. eHow: Demand Media,

Inc. Retrieved on November 30, 2011 from http://www.ehow.com/facts_709349_modern-theories-workplace-ethics.html

Shlinds (2011). Distributive justice: Rawls' theory and its implications on management.

Associated Content. Retrieved on November 30, 2011 from http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/376084/distributive_justice-rawls_theory_and_htm

Wilson, F. (2007). John Stuart Mill. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Stanford

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Sources Used in Document:

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Gilani, N. (2011). Utilitarianism in the workplace. eHow: Demand Media, Inc. Retrieved

on November 30, 2011 from http://www.ehow.com/info8785999_utilitarianism-workplace.html

Lamont, J. (2007). Distributive justice. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Stanford

University. Retrieved on November 30, 2011 from http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/justice-distributive

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