Homelessness Addiction and Mental Illness Essay

Excerpt from Essay :



The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to drug addiction.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

8.

The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

9.

There is a clear reciprocal relationship between homelessness, drug addiction and mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

10.

Mental illness plays a significant role in preventing homeless individuals from f inding suitable long-term housing. .

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

Implementation:

Singleton identifies the systematic procedure as a form of data gathering in which a survey or interview will be utilized in order to gather information for further analysis. His text points to the large-scale probability study as a form in which substantial populations can be measured according to representative sample sets. The "scientific sampling procedures" used in such studies can help to place empirical parameters around the distribution of a survey instrument to possible participants from a large spectrum. (Singleton, 239) Its major advantage is its provision of the ability to contend with a wide variant of sample sizes. As a drawback, this streamlined and technologically supported method of contacting respondents and soliciting data will likely be outside the price range of a smaller research organization.

The questionnaire mode of survey research is perhaps most common where data collection is concerned. With possible respondents presented printed surveys and asked to fill out/return said surveys, the questionnaire bears the notable drawback of a relatively low return rate. As opposed to an interview, for example, the survey questionnaire presents courted respondents the easy opportunity to ignore, overlook or disregard the survey. An advantage of the questionnaire, though, is its ergonomic structure, with all individuals presented the same questions. This serves as a method of internal control over experimental variables and thus will guide us in approaching social workers for the study in question.

Ethical and Cultural Considerations:

The Belmont Report (1979) is an explicit, though declaredly non-specific and therefore generally applicable, determination that research must be structured according to a distinct set of ethical guidelines in order to be considered valid. (NIH, 1) This is to say that, prior to this report, there existed no central consensus on how to protect the interests or research subjects and that, therefore, research prior to this could be unduly influenced by the improper treatment or manipulation of subjects. Indeed, it had not been uncommon even well into the 20th century for human subjects in American psychiatric institutions to be considered acceptable fodder for experimentation.

A significant influence which this document has had on the research process has been in its commitment of all researchers to a recognition of human dignity as crucial to maintaining the validity of a research investigation. Indeed, we may extrapolate the notion that this idea of human dignity serves that under terms which are not artificially or prejudicially imposed upon the subject, the subject is more likely to help to produce more valid results. This idea of pursuing research validity, though important, is of course secondary to the impact which the Report has had on the scientific community itself, which must in consideration of its findings, be more collectively oriented toward the respect of human subjects and the conscientious distinction between practice and research. As this applies to our research, this concerns the protection of individual privacy for respondents and denotes that gathered data will not be used in a way that is exploitive or inappropriate.

Increasing Reliability and Validity:

The reliability of the data in this case could be assured by engaging in numerous trials of the same survey distribution process. Therefore, the study in question could be conducted with different sample populations at incremental points. For instance, this study could be repeated every three months over one year, with the findings from four trials being used to approximate the relative consistency of findings.

Validity would be established based on the use of both control and experimental populations. This would require the creation of some viable intervention program to be conducted through the experimental group. For instance, this population might be engaged in a pilot mental health counseling program intended to yield a reduced recurrence of homelessness. By weighing the findings of survey respondents in both control…

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