Human Nature Voltaire, Rousseau & Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

d.).

Hewett (2006) stated Locke believed that merely facts from abstract ideas are eternal "as the existence of things is to be known only from experience," this moreover emphasize his line of reasoning that related to morality for he added that "the truth and certainty of moral discourses abstracts from the lives of men, and the existence of those values in the world, whereof they treat." Locke believed in inquiring everything and denying the authority either of the past or of the clergy for he desired everyone to depend on their own judgment and reasoning which is exactly the he created an contention to defend believing in God, and made sure to rebut the thought that reason is different to faith, saying that faith can never sway us of anything that opposes our knowledge and disagreeing that, apart from in the instance of divine revelation, people must constantly look first to their own reason; hence anything worldly and must not be closed to their own deduction, observation, experiment or experience should at all times be a matter of reason (Hewett, 2006).

Jean Jacques Rousseau, on the other hand, has been writing before the French Revolution surprised Western Civilization by suggesting that humans had once been solitary animals, and had learned to be political -- the significant point of this was the thought that human nature was not permanent, or at least not wherever close to the degree previously proposed by philosophers. Rousseau said that people, during his time, are political now but initially they were not; and this broke significant, and also politically perilous view, for the political events of the 19th and
...(Jean-Jacques Rousseau- Social Inequalities, emile, Gender Considerations, n. d.).

References

Binga, T. (2000). Voltaire. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from Council for Secular Humanism: http://www.secularhumanism.org/index.php?section=hall_of_fame&page=voltaire

Hewett, C. (2006). The Life of Voltaire. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from the Great Debate:

http://thegreatdebate.org.uk/Voltaire.html

Hewett, C. (2006). John Locke's Theory of Knowledge. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from the Great Debate: http://thegreatdebate.org.uk/LockeEpistem.html

Human Nature (n. d.). Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from Absolute Astronomy: Exploring the Universe of Knowledge: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Human_nature

Voltaire (2008). Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from New World Encyclopedia: http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Voltaire

Jean-Jacques Rousseau- Social Inequalities, emile, Gender Considerations. (n. d.). Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from Education-State University: http://education.stateuniversity.com/pages/2380/Rousseau-Jean-Jacques-1712-1778.html

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Binga, T. (2000). Voltaire. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from Council for Secular Humanism: http://www.secularhumanism.org/index.php?section=hall_of_fame&page=voltaire

Hewett, C. (2006). The Life of Voltaire. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from the Great Debate:

http://thegreatdebate.org.uk/Voltaire.html

Hewett, C. (2006). John Locke's Theory of Knowledge. Retrieved on March 19, 2009, from the Great Debate: http://thegreatdebate.org.uk/LockeEpistem.html

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