Imagery Literature Review Guided Imagery Literature Review

Length: 3 pages Sources: 3 Subject: Medicine Type: Literature Review Paper: #38369494 Related Topics: Contemporary Literature, Holistic Medicine, Pico, Literature
Excerpt from Literature Review :

Participants filled out a Short-Form McGill Questionnaire, an Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire in order to measure their levels of pain over the past few weeks. What the researchers found through statistical analysis was self-management strategies that reduced pain over time were most effective in the group that was exposed to guided imagery techniques. The level of guided imagery therapy was not itself significant, but more of the fact of whether or not it was present in the patient's therapy or not. This helps illustrate the effectiveness of guided imagery in managing long-term chronic pain when there are no fundamental cures present within traditional therapeutic practices. Pain management symptoms improved, but the symptoms overall remained. This shows that guided imagery is not a cure in and of itself, but rather an effective way to reduce and manage the pain that is present in chronic conditions like fibromyalgia.

Weydert, J.A., Shapiro, D.E., Acra, S.A., Monheim, C.J., Chambers, a.S., & Ball, T.M. (2006). Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial. BMC pediatrics, 6(1), 29.

This research explored the notion of whether or not guided imagery could help children manage their own pain levels. It also rests on the theoretical concept that guided imagery is a noninvasive and alternative method for successfully managing pain in various types of patient populations. Weydert et al. (2006) used a more specific population, working directly with children and minors under the age of 18 years old who suffer from reoccurring abdominal pain issues. The self-regulation technique of guided imagery was used as a potential pain intervention method that would help empower the participants by providing them with effective

...

In this randomized clinical study, 22 children were recruited through their primary physicians. Here, once again the independent variable was the presence of guided imagery techniques and the dependent variable was the pain level reported by the children throughout the process. Children in the experimental group were exposed to four weekly sessions with a therapist to help guide them with activities to induce muscle relaxation and other methods of guided imagery meant to manage pain. Others received breathing exercises alone. Children recorded their experiences in a diary that was later used to statistically analyze the levels of pain they were experiencing throughout the clinical trial. Children who only underwent breathing exercises saw much less success in pain management than those who underwent muscle relaxation therapy alongside breathing exercises. Thus, the results show that guided imagery does help with pain management, but only with more extreme therapeutic sessions in younger children who may have a harder time understanding the nature of the therapy and how it can be used to manage their pain. Guided imagery using muscle relaxation techniques can be a successful method for teaching pain management in children. Due to its simple and noninvasive nature, this makes it a plus for strategies of care regarding children.

References

Ferrell, Betty R., et al. "Pain management for elderly patients with cancer at home." CANCER-PHILADELPHIA- 74 (1994): 2139-2139.

Menzies, V., Taylor, a.G., & Bourguignon, C. (2006). Effects of guided imagery on outcomes of pain, functional status, and self-efficacy in persons diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 12(1), 23-30.

Weydert, J.A., Shapiro, D.E., Acra, S.A., Monheim, C.J., Chambers, a.S., & Ball, T.M. (2006). Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Ferrell, Betty R., et al. "Pain management for elderly patients with cancer at home." CANCER-PHILADELPHIA- 74 (1994): 2139-2139.

Menzies, V., Taylor, a.G., & Bourguignon, C. (2006). Effects of guided imagery on outcomes of pain, functional status, and self-efficacy in persons diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 12(1), 23-30.

Weydert, J.A., Shapiro, D.E., Acra, S.A., Monheim, C.J., Chambers, a.S., & Ball, T.M. (2006). Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial. BMC pediatrics, 6(1), 29.


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