Physiological Effects of Chronic Stress Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Continuous production of cortisol may also decrease the availability of tryptophan, the precursor for serotonin, resulting in depression, other mood disorders, and changes in appetite and sleep. Hyperactivity of the stress response has been implicated in the pathophysiology of melancholic depression, anxiety, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, substance abuse, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, hyporeactivity of the stress response has been associated with disorders such as atypical depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, hypothyroidism, and obesity (Selhub, 2002).

It has been shown that there is a definite connection between chronic stress and physical and psychological responses in the body. Stress in small amounts is fine, but chronic stress over a long extended period of time has been shown to manifest itself in a number of different physical and physiological aliments. It is believed by many experts that people should take steps to decrease their stress levels in order to fight off the ailments that are sure to follow.

References

Dennis, Barbara. (2004). Interrupt the stress cycle. Natural Health. 34(9), p. 70-75.

Innes, Kim E., Vincent, Heather K. And Taylor, Ann Gill. (2007). Chronic Stress and Insulin

Resistance -- Related Indices of Cardiovascular Disease Risk, Part 2: A Potential Role for Mind- Body Therapies. Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine, 13(5), p44-51.

Rosch, Paul J. (2007). Stress and the Gut: Mind over Matter? Health & Stress. 11, p. 1-4.

Selhub, Eva M. (2002). Stress and Distress in Clinical Practice: A Mind-Body Approach.

Nutrition in Clinical Care. 5(4), p. 182-190.

Sun, Jing, Wang, Sheng, Zhang, Jun-Quan and Li, Wei. (2007). Assessing the cumulative effects of stress: The association between job stress and allostatic load in a large sample of Chinese employees. Work & Stress. 21(4), p. 333-347.

Watson, Roger, Gardiner, Eric, Hogston, Richard, Gibson, Helen, Stimpson, Anne, Wrate,

Robert and Deary, Ian. (2009). A longitudinal study of stress and psychological distress in nurses and nursing students. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 18(2),…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Dennis, Barbara. (2004). Interrupt the stress cycle. Natural Health. 34(9), p. 70-75.

Innes, Kim E., Vincent, Heather K. And Taylor, Ann Gill. (2007). Chronic Stress and Insulin

Resistance -- Related Indices of Cardiovascular Disease Risk, Part 2: A Potential Role for Mind- Body Therapies. Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine, 13(5), p44-51.

Rosch, Paul J. (2007). Stress and the Gut: Mind over Matter? Health & Stress. 11, p. 1-4.

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