Political Science the Issue Raised Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :



The prevailing culture has its greatest effect in terms of the form of government accepted by the people. The American system of government was shaped to be different from the parliamentary system prevalent in England and in other countries of Europe. The most dominant form of government in Europe today is some form of parliamentary government with a prime minister generally chosen from the political party with the largest number of seats. Some countries have a president who participates in the selection, while others have the prime minister as the head of the government. Some European countries still have a monarchy, though this is largely relegated today to the position of head of state rather than head of the government, meaning that the monarch is a symbol of the unity of the nation and serves a ceremonial function without participating directly in the promulgation or passage of laws. In country after country similar provisions are found for selecting a prime minister and for structuring government, though these nation-states were formed and adopted their constitutions at different times and under different circumstances.

In terms of shaping the political debate over time, the most powerful force is the practical agenda of the political parties to get and keep power. This desire operates within the cultural system of the U.S., but it is the need to get elected that shapes the discourse to the greatest degree.

Works Cited

Basehart, Harry, and John Comer. "Partisan and Incumbent Effects in State Legislative Redistricting." Legislative Studies Quarterly 16, no. 1 (1991): 65-79.

Berry, William D., Michael B. Berkman, and Stuart Schneiderman. "Legislative Professionalism and Incumbent Reelection: The Development of Institutional Boundaries." American Political Science Review 94, no. 4 (2000): 859-874.

Bowen, John and John Richard. Critical Comparisons in Politics and Culture. New York: Cambridge University Press. 1999.

Chase, Oscar G. "Some Observations on the Cultural Dimension in Civil Procedure Reform." The American Journal of Comparative Law 45, no. 4, Symposium: Civil Procedure Reform in Comparative Context (1997): 861-870.

Duberman, Martin B. Left Out: The Politics of Exclusion: Essays 1964-2002. Cambridge: South End Press. 2002

Fiske, John. Media Matters: Everyday Culture and Political Change. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota. 1996

Lublin, David, and D. Stephen Voss. "Racial Redistricting and Realignment in Southern State Legislatures." American Journal of Political Science 44, no. 4 (2000): 792-810.

Marks, Gary, Carole J. Wilson, and Leonard Ray. "National Political Parties and European Integration." American Journal of Political Science 46, no. 3…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Basehart, Harry, and John Comer. "Partisan and Incumbent Effects in State Legislative Redistricting." Legislative Studies Quarterly 16, no. 1 (1991): 65-79.

Berry, William D., Michael B. Berkman, and Stuart Schneiderman. "Legislative Professionalism and Incumbent Reelection: The Development of Institutional Boundaries." American Political Science Review 94, no. 4 (2000): 859-874.

Bowen, John and John Richard. Critical Comparisons in Politics and Culture. New York: Cambridge University Press. 1999.

Chase, Oscar G. "Some Observations on the Cultural Dimension in Civil Procedure Reform." The American Journal of Comparative Law 45, no. 4, Symposium: Civil Procedure Reform in Comparative Context (1997): 861-870.

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