Protecting Maritime Ports in U.S. Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Subsequent to Bryant's editorial, of course, new policies and processes have been put in place, and the communication has seen vast improvement.

Many procedures for port safety are authored on Coast Guard Island, part of the city of alameda, where Coast Guard professionals keep their eyes on about 10,000 vessels "…on any given day," Carl Nolte writes in the San Francisco Chronicle. The procedure that is most important for the Coast Guard -- the "weapons system" -- is not gathering information but the careful analysis of information. "We track and predict events," said Coast Guard Commander Rocky Cole; the Coast Guard knows who is driving every ship, what the cargo is supposed to be, when it is expected into which port; and the Coast Guard receives this information from the CIA (that tracks vessels from satellites), from the Navy, and from news reports. Any suspected smugglers or terrorists are identified long before they come into port, so the local port authorities have been fully briefed on potential threats well ahead of the arrival of the vessel.

In conclusion, the security of ports is in the hands of the U.S. Coast Guard. They have the best technologies available to help them respond to terrorist threats and they are on constant watch for suspicious activities. The new port to be built in New Orleans needs to be totally in sync with and up to speed with the Homeland Security guidelines, and the procedures and processes for vetting all employees (civilian or military) must follow federal guidelines. Instant communication with all stakeholders, and with the Coast Guard central headquarters on Coast Guard Island. Moreover, the new port in New Orleans must meet structural standards because it will be built right in the line of fire of hurricanes, which strike the Louisiana coastline with frightening regularity.

Works Cited

Bryant, Dennis L. (2001). Protecting U.S. Ports. Traffic World, 265(40), p. 19.

Caldwell, Stephen L. (2006). Maritime Security: Information-Sharing Efforts are Improving.

Testimony before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Finance, and Accountability, Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives. U.S.

Government Accountability Office (GAO). Retrieved June 24, 2012, from http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt-GAO-06-933T.

Nolte, Carl. (2005). Pacific Coast / U.S. security now a Coast Guard job / "Vessels of interest" being tracked by bay's military post. San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved June 24, 2012,

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Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Bryant, Dennis L. (2001). Protecting U.S. Ports. Traffic World, 265(40), p. 19.

Caldwell, Stephen L. (2006). Maritime Security: Information-Sharing Efforts are Improving.

Testimony before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Finance, and Accountability, Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives. U.S.

Government Accountability Office (GAO). Retrieved June 24, 2012, from http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt-GAO-06-933T.

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