Teacher Intervention In School How Term Paper

Length: 10 pages Sources: 10 Subject: Children Type: Term Paper Paper: #54896337 Related Topics: Spanking, Teaching Strategies, Gymnastics, Teaching Methods
Excerpt from Term Paper :



Now, teachers are complaining that they feel abused and harassed with the young students.

The students tend to become abusive. They do not respect the teachers. They swear and shout at the teachers. They throw things at the teachers and in some instances, the students physically assault the teachers.

This is the reason why most teachers feel threatened and would want to resign from their works.

Thus, without the corporal punishment, the students do not learn the real value of discipline and they do not maintain proper conduct. The students who did not receive any corporal punishment when they were still on their younger years tend to have deviant behaviors as they grow older.

Meanwhile, there are also studies which have proven that corporal punishment offers nothing but negative effects to both the psychological and emotional aspects of a child. Some of the proven negative impacts of corporal punishment are:

The corporal punishment in the form of physical punishment enhances various deviant behavior of the student like lying, stealing, cheating, bullying, assaulting a sibling or peers, and lack of remorse for wrongdoing. This is particularly evident when corporal punishment is done regularly (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

It should be noted that children-students would of course fear being "punished." If the consistently receive corporal punishment, their tendency is to prevent the teacher from having any reason of punishing them. Part of their prevention technique is to hide and/or lie about the misconducts that they have done, or stop anybody who will act as the "witness" of such misconduct, thus the bullying behavior.

Corporal punishment increases the risk of child abuse (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

Teachers who will not be prevented to do any form of corporal punishment will have the feeling the tendency to "enjoy" punishing the students even if it is not necessary. This is the very reason why there are reports of child abuse committed inside the school premises.

Teachers who impose corporal punishment are not serving a good example for the students, instead they are serving as the models for "aggressive behavior and for inappropriate ways of dealing with conflict" (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

The idea of "an eye for an eye" will be instilled in the young minds of the students. There will be heightened tendency for the students to think that asking for forgiveness or sorry will never be enough to amend things.

Corporal punishments are ways of eroding trust between a child and a teacher (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

The students will have the tendency of not entrusting their lives...

...

They will be hiding information that they think will only result from punishing them. At the same time, students who have been given corporal punishments for more than once will be tagged as the 'trouble initiator' and will result from the teacher not trusting the student anymore. The teacher will always think that whenever there will be chaos in the school, that particular student caused it or has great participation for it.

A it is believed that corporal punishment affects the cognitive development of the students (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

Spanking the student's buttocks and/or hands and doing other forms of punishments can of course hurt the student's body. If this is done more that once or twice a week, the student's growth physically, emotionally and intellectually may be slowed down.

It is believed that children who have regularly received corporal punishment will grow as an adult who suffer "from depression and other negative social and mental health outcomes" (Lombardo and Polonko, 2000).

This is the long-term effect of corporal punishment. The impact can be felt even until the adult years of the child. he/she will be continuously suffering from lowered self-esteem, anxiety, depression and other forms of mental problems.

Conclusion

As it is discussed, the teachers are responsible for motivating the students not only from maintaining good educational achievements, but also from maintaining good values and right conduct. It has become one of the strategies of the teacher to use various forms of corporal punishment to ensure that the students will learn how to behave well by not doing and redoing deviant acts.

Corporal punishments may be serving as one of the most effective way of disciplining the students, but there are also negative impacts that such kind of punishment brings to children. Now the question is, is it not advisable to impose corporal punishment to children students? Is corporal punishment the only way to motivate and intervene with the students?

Motivating and intervening with the students can be done in many different ways and means without negatively affecting the psychological and emotional state of the student. It should be noted that the teachers' real responsibility is to provide positive learning to the children. With the proven negative impacts of corporal punishment, it is now clear that this is not the proper and positive way of motivating and intervening with the students.

Reference List

Curry, Lisa M. Effective Teaching through High Expectation and Class Management. 2000. USA Gymnastics. http://www.usa-dymnastics.org/publications/technique/2000/4/effective-teaching.html

Effective Instructional Strategies. http://www.flstw.fsu.edu/integrate/efins.html

Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew. 2004. "The effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior in children." Social Work Research

Lombardo, Lucien X. And Polonko, Karen A. 2000. "Comparative Analysis of the Corporal Punishment of Children: An Exploration of Human Rights and U.S. Law," International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Vol. 29, No.2, Fall 2005 pp. 173

Meltz, Barbara. 29 July 2002. "The consequences of spanking: Study suggests that corporal punishment may have life-altering side effects." Houston Chronicle/Boston Globe.

Motivation. 1997.Excerpted from Chapter 11 of Biehler/Snowman, PSYCHOLOGY APPLIED TO TEACHING, 8/e, Houghton Mifflin. http://college.hmco.com/education/pbl/tc/motivate.html#motivation

Strategies for Classroom Management. http://osi.fsu.edu/waveseries/htmlversions/wave3.htm

The Cognitive Advantages of Balanced Bilingualism. 2004. Brain Connection.com. http://www.brainconnection.com/topics/?main=fa/cognitive-bilingualism4

What Makes an Effective Teacher? 2004. http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/tac/toolbox/tips/effective.html

Sources Used in Documents:

Reference List

Curry, Lisa M. Effective Teaching through High Expectation and Class Management. 2000. USA Gymnastics. http://www.usa-dymnastics.org/publications/technique/2000/4/effective-teaching.html

Effective Instructional Strategies. http://www.flstw.fsu.edu/integrate/efins.html

Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew. 2004. "The effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior in children." Social Work Research

Lombardo, Lucien X. And Polonko, Karen A. 2000. "Comparative Analysis of the Corporal Punishment of Children: An Exploration of Human Rights and U.S. Law," International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Vol. 29, No.2, Fall 2005 pp. 173


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