Theory and Practice Essay

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As the sessions proceeded, the therapist debriefed the client with the aim of de-escalating her psychologically. This enabled the client to explore and express a feeling of guilt and perception that she had failed to give her best to maintain her job. During the debriefing process, it was evident that the client believed that she was responsible for her job loss. She had been experiencing notable difficulties maintaining concentration and sleeping. Ultimately, this led to significant distress in social function.

After a week, the client reported to the therapist that she felt that she was not alone in the first time. As a result, she reported that she no longer needed the sedative medication, but remained compliant to the prescribed medication. After a while, the client related her belief in her ability to apply for new job opportunities. It is evident that the client's experience achieved the diagnostic criteria for Acute Stress Disorder. This is especially the time aspect. Her disturbance and persistence were appropriate (Wainrib & Bloch, 2008).

Although the client was not a stranger to stressful events, she was not prepared for the loss of a job that led to emotional trauma. The client attended some few follow-up sessions: she has not experienced any signs associated with traumatic events. By the close of the sessions, she had terminated the medication. She exhibited a number of resilience factors such as pre-incident preparation and training, initiation of crisis intervention, cognitive abilities, spiritual beliefs, and rapid response to debriefing to apply multicomponent strategies (Hillman, 2012).

Counselors must be cognizant of typical responses of people struggling with trauma or those experiencing a crisis. From a cognitive perspective, the client might blame herself or others for her job loss. As a result, she seems to be hypersensitive, disoriented, and confused. Physical reactions to such trauma include shock and anger. Some emotional reactions include depression, panic, anxiety, denial, and fear. When counselors are assessing behavior, some common responses are withdrawal from social events, lack of interest in social things and conflict with another.

Conclusion

Indefinite loss of employment makes an individual vulnerable to trauma. In such a case, a person's normal ways of handling the world are interrupted. Although the client has limited time to react and respond to the crisis, the condition might persist as post-traumatic stress symptoms. Loss of employment is universal and can affect people from diverse cultures. However, culture plays a significant role in how a person interprets and responds to loss of employment. Communities offer support that seems to be culture bound.

Therefore, crisis intervention mechanisms must be structured to appreciate the culture of the Canadian client and the dynamics of the changing world of employment. Crisis interventions are designed to be brief: counselors can have a single session to help the client. While this time seems to be insufficient, successful counselors convey an expectation that change will occur and that minor changes are enough to solve the prevailing problem. The satisfaction of seeing the client resume control after her life has been shuttered is extremely rewarding.

References

Hillman, J.L. (2012). Crisis intervention and trauma counseling: New approaches to evidence-based practice. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

Wainrib, B.R., & Bloch, E.L. (2008). Crisis intervention and trauma response: Theory and practice. New York: Springer.

Ziegler, S.M. (2010). Theory-directed nursing practice. New…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Hillman, J.L. (2012). Crisis intervention and trauma counseling: New approaches to evidence-based practice. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

Wainrib, B.R., & Bloch, E.L. (2008). Crisis intervention and trauma response: Theory and practice. New York: Springer.

Ziegler, S.M. (2010). Theory-directed nursing practice. New York: Springer Pub. Co.

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