Violent TV Effect on Kids Effects of Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

Violent TV Effect on Kids

Effects of Violent TV Programming and How to Impose Limitations to Exposure

"Violence on Television -- What Do Children Learn? What Can Parents Do?" By the American Psychological Association (APA) provides an introspective view into how violence on television affects children and presents an argument that exposure to violence should be monitored. Alternately, Tim Goodman provides an argument based upon personal opinions and observations in which he defends television programming and shifts the blame of exposure onto the individual. Both articles provide an insight into violence on television and what can be done to limit exposure to said violence.

In "Violence on Television -- What Do Children Learn? What Can Parents Do?," the American Psychological Association provides evidence that supports their claim that exposure to violence on television has a negative impact on children, provided these children are exposed to violent television programming. According to the studies conducted by the American Psychological Association and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), it has been determined that children that are exposed to significant amounts of violent television programming are prone to be less affected by violence and are also "less likely to call for help or intervene when they witness violent acts among their peers" (American Psychological Association). Furthermore, the APA and NIMH argue that exposure to violent television programming can have negative psychological effects on a child including becoming "less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others," being more fearful of their environment, and being more prone to displaying aggression or exhibiting harmful behavior towards others (American Psychological Association). These arguments are corroborated by extensive studies conducted at the University of Pennsylvania which found that children exposed to television programs that contain approximately 20 violent acts and children that watch excessive amounts of television are "more likely to think that the world is a mean and dangerous place" (American Psychological Association). Moreover, studies conducted at the University of Illinois also found that these children, in addition to exhibiting higher levels of aggression, were also "more likely to be arrested and prosecuted for criminal acts as adults" (American Psychological Association).

While there is no doubt that excessive exposure to violent television programming can have negative effects on a child's psychological development and possibly have an impact on their future, the American Psychological Association provides suggestions on how parents can help their children cope with violent television programming. For example, the APA contends that limiting the amount of hours that a child watches television can reduce their aggressive tendencies. Additionally, parents should participate in television viewing and watch at least one hour of television programming that his or her child watches on a regular basis in order to know what their child is exposed to on a regular basis. Parents should also discuss any violent incidents that they witness on television and extend the discussion to include an introspective view into what motivated the violence. Furthermore, parents should be proactive and ban any programming that they find to be too violent, impose limits on how much television a child can watch a day, and/or…

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