Worst Hard Times Those Who Research Proposal

Excerpt from Research Proposal :

The land was already suffering from the eradication of grass because of cattle-farming, the natural balance of the ecosystem had been destroyed as a result of the tyranny and greed of man, and now the land, starving, ate the farmers alive. Dust pneumonia killed men and women living on soil that only a few years ago had yielded wild profits during the wheat boom, when the rest of the world had suffered a wheat shortage.

There is something poignantly human about the attitude towards money and profit in the farmers that everyone can relate to -- how can something that once was so profitable suddenly evaporate, after all? How could the climate change so quickly -- it seemed impossible? Also, vibrant settlements had been built up around the area, after all. These were not small, isolated farming towns in many cases, but true communities that had been enriched by the early boom days. The stubborn personalities of the men and women, fused their fates with the stubborn land, and they refused to leave, against all persuasion and even, one might argue, good sense.

Works Cited

Egan, Timothy. The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great

American Dust Bowl. Houghton…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Egan, Timothy. The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great

American Dust Bowl. Houghton Mifflin, 2005

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