American Imperialism Essays (Examples)

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Imperialism of Europe and America

Words: 2376 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43354772

European and American imperialism from 1900-1918

Empire is the term from which the word imperialism is carved. Government implies the act of mastery of one nation by another one, with the sole intention of expanding region, power and impact. It conveys with it the thought of social prevalence from the radical, judging the lifestyle, cultures and convictions of those colonized as sub-par and in need of changeover (Encyclopedia, encyclopedia.com).

Nonetheless, Imperialism normally posits as a political control and making monetary subservience. In Europe, the time of dominion coincided with patriotism and unification when prior political units were assembled under governance that asserted the privilege to keep rule over them. "I rehash that the elite races [European] have a privilege in light of the fact that they have an obligation. They have the obligation to socialize the downtrodden races [non Europeans] (South Africa History, n.d.)"

Ashley Smith the journalist isolated hypotheses…… [Read More]

References

Encyclopedia. "Imperialism." Encyclopedia.com. HighBeam Research, 1 Jan. 1968. Web. 25 Jan. 2015.  http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/imperialism.aspx 

Grafs History. Word War 1: Consequences of the Great War. (2014). Retrieved from:  https://grafshistory.wordpress.com 

Humbold. Goal. The American Quest for Empire. Retrieved from:

 http://users.humboldt.edu/ogayle/hist111/empire.html
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American Popular Culture Impact Overseas

Words: 4214 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94179363

The cultural practices are evolved and based on the financial, social and moral understanding and capabilities of the local population, and it has been observed that Americans, Asians and Africans share extremely different perspectives and understanding on these issues, therefore the cultural adoption has been intense in countries where the technological revolution has been of the same intensity as in North America (Zelli, 1993). In some of the cases, the Americans companies has attempted to nullify the concerns and shortcomings of the American culture, by incorporating the cultural values of the local region, and has therefore evolve a different taste for the customers to avail, this has further delighted and fascinated the local population of different regions towards the American culture, for example the American culture has major differences with the Islamic culture adopted in Arab countries, therefore to compensate for such difference the American companies introduced the concept of…… [Read More]

References

David W. Noble. Death of a Nation: American Culture and the End of Exceptional-ism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 2002

Tafarodi R., Swann W. Individualism-collectivism and global self-esteem: Evidence for a cultural trade-off. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 1996

Trubisky P, Ting Toomey S, Lin S. The influence of individualism collectivism and self-monitoring on conflict styles. International Journal of Intercultural Relations. 1991

Huesmann, Zelli, Fraczek, Upmeyer. Normative attitudes about aggression in American, German and Polish college students. Presented at Third European Congress of Psychology. Tampere, Finland. 1993
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American Democracy Contact Between Europeans

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77214073



Given the very nature of colonialism and imperialism, it is doubtful that the Europeans would have wanted to give any credit to the Native Americans for their contributions to the development of democracy in the United States. As Johansen points out, the settlers in the Northeast must have gleaned some information about how Enlightenment principles can be put into practice. However, the indigenous peoples of North America were incredibly diverse, as were the settlers and their settlement patterns. Influences of Native Americans on Europeans varied, and in many cases the interactions were totally unlike the ones described by Johansen.

Although Johansen overestimates the influence of the Iroquois Confederacy government and social structure on the development of democracy in the United States, the role of Native Americans in the development of the United States should not be discounted. The very fact that Europeans encountered diverse indigenous peoples became a major factor…… [Read More]

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American History Slave Revolts Although

Words: 6354 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54831518

Alexander Hamilton carried on an affair with the wife of "a notorious political schemer," Maria Reynolds. Andrew Jackson married Rachel Jackson before her divorce from Lewis Robards was finalized and therefore was accused of marrying a married woman. Jackson's opponent in 1828, John Quincy Adams, was in turn accused of "corrupt bargaining" during his term. Jackson also championed Margaret O'Neill Timberlake, who married his secretary of war, John Eaton. "Peggy O'Neill" was considered a woman of "questionable virtue," and as a result Martin Van Buren became Jackson's successor in the presidency. After the death of Jackson and Eaton, Peggy married a 19-year-old dance teacher (which raised eyebrows, as she was 59), who embezzled her money and ran off to Europe with her 17-year-old granddaughter.

Other scandals concerned Richard Mentor Johnson, who ran for vice president in 1836 with Martin Van Buren. He supposedly shot Tecumseh during the ar of 1812,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferling, John. Adams vs. Jefferson: the tumultuous election of 1800. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
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Americans in Muslim Countries American

Words: 951 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59222068



A recent artifact that came as a product of this intercultural relationship is an article concerning an American woman's imprisonment -- which included beatings from the police and forcing her to sign false confessions -- simply for being seen eating in public with her male business partner. Even though the woman (who allowed her name to be printed only as "Yara," fearing retribution for telling her story) was wearing the traditional full-length gown and headscarf required of women when in public or in the company of men in Saudi Arabia,

she was approached by several men "with very long beards and white dresses" and told that what she was doing was "a great sin," a statement that reflects the disparity between the two cultures (Dhimmi Watch 2008). Ironically, the event took place at a Starbuck's, a place that has come to be a symbol of America's capitalism, freedom, and to…… [Read More]

Reference

Dhimmi Watch. (2008). "American woman jailed in Saudi Arabia for sitting with men at Satrbuck's." Reprinted from Fox News. Accessed 10 May 2009. http://www.jihadwatch.org/dhimmiwatch/archives/019844.php
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American History

Words: 1626 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19013391

American History

The underside of affluence

The period is in the early years of the twentieth century. America is now experiencing economic and political expansion as it became the model of an imperial superpower for all nations, both in the Western and Eastern regions. Economic growth spurred as a result of the industrial revolution, while political structures strengthened due to the numerous successful conquests of the Americans to colonize nations in the Asian and southern American regions.

However, despite the affluence that American society had experienced during this period, a considerable half of the American population is suffering from poverty. With the rise of urbanization, many people flocked to the cities in search of a high-paying job and steady source of income as factory workers. However, the rapid incidence of migration to the cities made them crowded with people, hence, living conditions began to deteriorate, which includes the lack of…… [Read More]

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American Media Representation of Islam

Words: 3949 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4285978

" (Iyengar, 2001) Lastly, the manner of presentation of a news story "significantly affects its ability to set the public agenda." (Behr and Iyengark 1985; Dearing and Rogers, 1996) Concluded is that: "In the current regime, American politics is almost exclusively a mediated experience. The role of the citizen ahs evolved from occasional foot soldier and activist to spectators. Those who seek public office invest heavily in efforts to shape news coverage of their candidacy. The returns from this investment provide them with leverage over public opinion, by setting the public agenda or by projecting a general impression of competent leadership..." (Iyengar, 2001)

The report published by the "ediaatters for America' website entitled: "According to aher, CBS's "Free Speech" is a isnomer" states that Bill aher, HBO's Real Time with Bill aher show host states that "CBS rejected his request to comment on religion for his planned "Free Speech" segment…… [Read More]

Miles, M.B., & Huberman, a.M. (1984). Qualitative data analysis, a sourcebook of new methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Miller, W.L., & Crabtree, B.F. (1992). Primary care research: A multimethod typology and qualitative road map. In B.F. Crabtree & W.L. Miller (Eds.), Doing qualitative research. Research methods for primary care (Vol. 3). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

The American Media Representation of Islam & Terrorism Post 9-11
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American Terrorism for Many People

Words: 14357 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86656733



The USA Patriot Act: This was a law that was passed after September 11th. It is giving the police and intelligence officials the power to go after terrorists organizations easier. As it lifted various Constitutional protections when investigating these offenses.

Counter Terrorism: These are the activities that: federal, state and local officials are taking to prevent future terrorist attacks.

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD): These are weapons designed to inflict large amounts of casualties. These include: chemical, radiological, biological and nuclear.

These different terms are important, because they will help to avoid confusion and will focus the reader on understanding the overall scope of the problem.

Limitations of the Study

The limitations of the study are that the information we are presenting, could be pointing out a number of different problems. Yet, beneath the surface they are failing to identify possible changes that could have already been implemented by federal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

39% Say Government. (2011). Rasmussen Reports. Retrieved from:  http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/march_2011/39_say_government_not_focusing_enough_on_threat_of_domestic_islamic_terrorism 

Al Shabaab American Recruits. (2010). ADL. Retrieved from: http://www.adl.org/main_Terrorism/al_shabaab_american_recruits.htm

Comparative Analysis. (2011). Business Dictionary. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/comparative-analysis.html 

Jose Padilla. (2009). New York Times. Retrieved from: http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/jose_padilla/index.html
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American Revolution Was Modeled After Revolutions in

Words: 1999 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69367832

American evolution Was Modeled After evolutions in France and England

The American quest for freedom, modeled after reform movements in England and France, has resulted in the most revered democratic society in the world. We are free of the religious and political tyranny that plagued Europe in the 18th Century and early colonialists would approve of our government in 2002.

While the American evolution and the quest for freedom was modeled after revolutions in France and England, the United States has done something that its European relatives admire - it achieved a stable democracy free of aristocratic and religious tyranny - and this was accomplished in a relatively bloodless fashion.

Our success would meet with accolades from European philosophers and historians including Jean-Jacques ousseau, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Thomas Paine and Francois Furet. However, our success has also many developing nations and Middle East nations to regard us as arrogant…… [Read More]

References

1. J. Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1762, Chapter 18

2. F. Furet, paraphrased from Interpreting The French Revolution, 1970

3. F. Bastiat "What is Seen and What is Not Seen," in Selected Essays, pp. 1-50.

4. J. Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1762, Chapter 18
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Imperialism The Highest Stage of

Words: 3656 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88905442

53). He points out that four countries (in 1917) -- England, France, Germany, and the United States -- own 80 per cent of the world's finance capital; thus, in his view, the whole rest of the world is subjugated, that is, indebted to and tributary to those four "international banker countries."

Where once monopolists exported goods to other countries to make a profit, now they export finance capital. This is another symptom of the imperialistic stage of capitalism -- what to do with excess wealth? Lenin states that it would not be capitalism if the excess wealth were used to improve the quality of life for the millions of people who are still underfed and leading lives of misery. Instead, the capital is exported to "backward" countries and used to make more profits. In backward countries (now called developing nations) where there is a shortage of capital, labor is cheap,…… [Read More]

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American Fears and Bigotry Toward

Words: 741 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47362742



This sort of behavior and scapegoating was the intellectual and cultural "easy way out" for many Americans looking for solace from the events taking place thousands of miles away, affecting the entire country. In the fog of war, as writer Barbre (2000) puts it, mistakes are made and generalizations are easily placed into existence. hen Americans were confused and scared, they looked to the easiest form of comfort, the alienation of the outsider or the "other."

Sexual Projection and the Internment of the Japanese-Americans

riter Renteln (1995) explores the role that sexual projection had in the dealing with Japanese-Americans in internment camps during II. This can be directly related to the themes within the book Snow Falling of Cedars due to the fact that Americans used their fear of the outsider (Japanese and Japanese-Americans) to project their own fears and misgivings about their sexuality and feelings of inadequacy. As author…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barbre, C. (2000). "Review: Films: The Straight Story, Snow Falling on Cedars."

Journal of Religion and Health. Vol. 39, No. 4. pp. 383-385.

Renteln, A.D. (1995). "A Psychohistorical Analysis of the Japanese-American

Internment." Human Rights Quarterly. Vol. 17, No. 4 pp. 618-648.
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American Power Over the Past

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44012298

In other words, once our leadership gains office, then whatever was said goes the way of special interest, because the interest of the greater society becomes lost in the quest of self-interest.

e are perhaps for the first time in our nation's history attempting to understand our own path to the power we are perceived by the rest of the world as having. In fact, as Harvey so succinctly demonstrates in his discussion on the political maneuvering, because America could not have by any stretch of the imagination have accomplished its present act upon the world stage without a supporting cast of world players (28). hen they built America up for purposes of pursuing their own self-interest, then their support of America quickly began deteriorating, disintegrating to a lack of control of their own political forces, economies, and even inability to mobilize their human resources as they would have previously…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harvey, David. The New Imperialism, Oxford University Press, 2005.
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Historic Imperialism

Words: 1497 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60236139

imperialism is necessary for cultures to progress. The United States is not often thought of as an imperialistic nation, because we like to think that we would not subjugate or take over other countries. However, that is just what we did when our forefathers came to this country and shoved aside the Native Americans. We subjugated and eradicated a culture and way of life, and that is the textbook definition of imperialism. Imperialism is wrong and shameful, but it seems that as much it may be hard to say, it is necessary for securing our way of life, and it is crucial in developing new trade and commerce.

First, it is necessary to define imperialism. Imperialism is the name for larger, more powerful nations to take over smaller, weaker nations, usually because of the promise of wealth or resources they can exploit. There is a long history of imperialism throughout…… [Read More]

References

Alam, M.S. "U.S. Imperialism and the Third World." Northeastern University. 2006. 14 Dec. 2009.

.

Amin, Samir. "Imperialism and Globalization." Monthly Review June 2001: 6.

Bonner, Robert E. "Slavery, Confederate Diplomacy and the Racialist Mission of Henry Hotze." Civil War History 51.3 (2005): 288+.
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Protestant Ref Imperialism and WWI

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34222582

92). Pope Innocent X lamented the procedure, of course -- for it served to subvert the truths which the oman Church strove to propagate.

Thus, the modern world was built not upon the majesty of kings and religion, but upon treaties and revolutionary ideals. The philosophical fruit of Protestantism would spring up in the age of omantic/Enlightenment doctrine, which would produce the American and French evolutions. "Liberty, equality, fraternity" would be the modern world's ethos -- in theory. However, capitalist ethics would undermine the romantic ideology. Imperialism -- for gold, God, and glory at the end of the medieval world -- would be based, in the modern world, upon sheer greed (as a principle). America defined this principle well with the notion of "manifest destiny," which by the end of the 19th century was expanded beyond the American frontier to encompass the whole globe.

The new Imperialism of America (and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Elliot, J.H. (2009). Spain, Europe and the Wider World: 1500-1800. Yale Universtiy

Press.

Haaren, J. (1904). Famous Men of the Middle Ages. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
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American Isolationism End of U S

Words: 831 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99669801

In 1838 there were 200 locomotives in the United States, by 1880 that number had risen to 1,962 and to 3,153 by 1900. (ogers, 2009, p. 21) The expansion of the railroad system helped to increase American industrialization, and industrial output, which increased American overseas trade. But there could not be overseas trade without American ships to carry American products to foreign nations. While primitive iron ships had come into existence during the American Civil War, it was the period after the war that iron ships became numerous. For example, "The number of iron and steel ships built in a year increased from one in 1867 to 31 in 1880, and to 90 in 1900." (ogers, 2009, p. 21)

The 1800's were a time of development for the United States; as a nation it began as an agricultural country and developed into an industrialized nation. As the population of American…… [Read More]

References

"A History of American Agriculture: 1800." Agriculture in the Classroom.

 http://www.agclassroom.org/gan/timeline/1800.htm 

Barney, William. A Companion to 19th-century America. 2006. Malden, MA: Blackwell

Publishing. Print.
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Imperialism Was Always Seen as Positive for

Words: 1411 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27830599

Imperialism was always seen as positive for Westerners, but as destructive by the peoples of Africa and Asia." To what extent does this statement appear to be true?

Rudyard Kipling's "The White man's burden" seems to be an ironic condemnation of imperialism. Whilst most Westerners of the viewed imperialism as a necessary fact and as a boon to the 'savages', Kipling was a pre-contemporary in more ways than one and saw the 'Whites' as simply one more other race populating the world. The White man in his greed and folly was perpetrating needless wars and occupying another's land as well as stealing their wives, children, property, and money for the benefit of themselves. Kipling, however, was unique in that most Westerners disagreed with him. To them, they were not only doing their duty but many defined their acts as charity. They were educating the illiterate; teaching the savage the ways…… [Read More]

Sources

Aristotle, and C.D.C. Reeve, (translator) (1998) Politics. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Pub

Bartolome de Las Casas, 1550. Apologetic History of the Indies. Columbia University.  http://www.columbia.edu/acis/ets/CCREAD/lascasas.htm 

Fromkin. D (1989) The Peace to End All Peace: The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East. New York, NY: Avon,.

Said E. (2003). Orientalism, New York, NY: Vintage Books
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American Foreign Policy Change in

Words: 794 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80618837

She was endorsed by President Teddy Roosevelt. Many women also worked for the U.S. Navy as clerical workers. The Army hired women to work as phone operators and nurses in the European theater, but playing the role as civilians.

But women also worked on a no-pay basis; more than 25,000 U.S. woman served the war cause by helping nurse some of the wounded as volunteers, helped provide food and other things the military needed. The "Hello Girls" were female volunteer phone operators, and helped entertain the troops. The "doughboys" (soldiers) treated American women entertainers with respect, but the doughboys didn't treat French women with the same respect.

Things during the fighting changed for young men of course, as a draft went into effect in 1917, which called for all men between the ages of 21 and 30 to register for military service; later those ages were change to 18 and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carnes, Mark C., & Garraty, John a. The American Nation, 12th Edition. New York: Longman,
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Imperialism in Iraq and Iran

Words: 4064 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87629388

Iran and Iraq

Analysis of the Impact of Imperialism on Iran and Iraq

The modern nation of Iraq was formed in 1932 when the Kingdom of Iraq gained independence from the United Kingdom. It had been placed under the authority of Great Britain as the British Mandate of Mesopotamia by the League of Nations in 1920. Prior to that, it was part of the Ottoman Empire. This delineates the history of imperialism in Iraq as beginning with the arrival of the Ottomans the 15th century, through independence from the Great Britain. These two stage of imperial rule had several different impacts on modern-day Iraq.

The first is the borders of the current state of Iraq were the direct result of British rule. The Ottomans had administered Iraq differently, with three main provinces. Under Ottoman rule, Baghdad, Mosul and Basra were all provinces within the Ottoman Empire. Iraq was not Iraq…… [Read More]

References

Butch, T. (2015). Why China will intervene in Iraq. Asia Times. Retrieved May11, 2016 from http://atimes.com/2015/09/why-china-will-intervene-in-iraq/

CIA World Factbook (2016). People's Republic of China. Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved May 11, 2016 from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ch.html

Dawson, J. (2014). Why Britain created monarchies in the Middle East. New Statesman. Retrieved May 11, 2016 from http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2014/08/why-britain-created-monarchies-middle-east

Dehghan, S. & Taylor, R. (2013). CIA admits role in 1953 Iranian coup. The Guardian. Retrieved May 11, 2016 from http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/19/cia-admits-role-1953-iranian-coup
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Imperialism and the Industrial Revolution

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21931924


1 Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution began in the 18th and 19th centuries and is responsible for the moving of nations away from farming to industry and manufacturing. The Industrial Revolution introduced trains, more advanced shipping, steel production, communications systems, cars, planes, and military equipment, and construction. The skyscraper came into existence, people moved to urban areas away from the countryside. Wars broke out as nations fought over natural resources like oil fields, minerals, and sea lanes to support the new industries.

The nations of the world were able to engage in Industrialization because of another rise—the rise of finance. Banks began to exert more and more influence over the activities of nations. They financed big productions and helped businessmen develop companies that would go on to dominate industries. Banks started working with governments too and together they started redrawing international territories, with wars financed by banks that led to…… [Read More]

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American Political Thought

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14886078

right' in the light of Alexis De Tocqueville's book, Democracy in America. The paper further expands on the idea of right as presented by other thinkers including Hegel, Bancroft and most recently Hardt and Negri.

Every person is born with an inherent sense of right and born which may later be altered, shaped or influenced by the society and person's own experiences. Philosophers have always been concerned with what they term the 'idea of right' and have expounded theories on how it is acquired, why it is needed and what happened when it ceases to exist. Alexis De Tocqueville was one such thinker who in his Magnus opus, Democracy in America, instructed readers to acquire an idea of right for he argued that it was impossible to build a great nation without a sense of right and wrong. Here idea of right must not be confused with 'rights' of people…… [Read More]

References

1) DEREK H. DAVIS, EDITORIAL. God and the Pursuit of America's Self-Understanding: Toward a Synthesis of American Historiography. Journal of Church and State, VOLUME 46 SUMMER 2004 NUMBER 3

2) Alexis De Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Book I: Chapter 14: Retrieved online 6th December 2004: http://www.americanreformation.org/Tocqueville/1_ch14.htm

3) Extracts from Hegel, "Hegel on Right" Retrieved online 6th December 2004: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/www/study/xhegel.htm

4) "The Sovereignty of Ethics" by Ralph Waldo Emerson: from the North American Review, of May, 1878. Vol. X. 12. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Lectures and Biographical Sketches. pp. 175-206
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recent american history and pedagogy

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93203665

American history is an exercise in country branding and national identity construction. Through a careful editorializing and curating of historical documents, events, and places, historians contribute to the shaping of American identity, ideology, and culture. Revisiting the process of history making shows how historians and history educators can encourage critical thought, shifting away from the use of historiography as propaganda toward a discursive process. Historians can define and interpret evidence in different ways based on their own historical and cultural context, and the influences of prevailing social norms.

American history has long been a myth-making process, rather than a discursive exercise. Westad (2007), Dudziak (2004) and Manela all points out how the United States has cultivated and crafted an identity based on the tenets of liberty, justice, and freedom. Yet in practice, the nation has been an exercise in exploitation, imperialism, and racism. "From its inception the United States was…… [Read More]

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Culture Behind Americans at War

Words: 5158 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82646531

American Way of War

The history of the American Way of War is a transitional one, as Weigley shows in his landmark work of the same name. The strategy of war went from, under Washington, a small scale, elude and survive set of tactics practiced by what seem today to be relatively "quaint" militias, to -- in the 20th century -- a full-scale operation known as "total war." True, "total war" was not a concept invented by the Americans in the 20th century. The North eventually practiced "total war" against the Confederates when Sherman's campaign left utter destruction of civilian territory in its wake. The ancient Romans practiced it when, under the direction of Cato, they destroyed Carthage because its mere existence, they felt, posed a threat to their prosperity. In the 20th century, however, "total war" received an enormous boost of technical support when the inventors of the atom…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Butler, Smedley. War is a Racket. LA: Feral House, 2003.

Chollet, Derek and James Goldgeier. America Between the Wars. NY: Public Affairs,

2009.

Debs, Eugene. "Anti-War Speech," 16 June 1918. Web.
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Conflict and Cooperation Native Americans and European

Words: 1901 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26066813

Conflict and Cooperation: Native Americans and European Settlers in Early America

The early history of the settlement of what would eventually become the United States has many competing narratives. Many people view the relationship between Native Americans and European settlers as fundamentally combative. hile at times the relationship between the colonists and the Native Americans was certainly one of conflict, this period was also full of significant curiosity, education and cooperation that went on between both groups. Many times, each group was inquisitive about the other and knowledge was exchanged. The Native Americans were often portrayed as brutal savages, but current literature shows that this was not often the case. The apparent viciousness of the European settlers towards the native peoples, particularly in terms of cultural destruction and land acquisition, is also more complicated than it initially seems. Though the eventually dominance of the Europeans over the Native Americans lead…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kupperman, Karen Ordahl. Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America. New York:

Cornell University Press, 2000.

-- . "English Perceptions of Treacherym 1583-1640: The Case of the American 'Savage'." The Historical Journal. Vol 20. No. 2. (June 1977) pp. 263-287.

-- . Roanoke: The Abandoned Colony. 2nd Edition. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield
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Free Are American Media Events Occur and

Words: 1125 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25129975

Free Are American Media

Events occur and become news, news circulate all around the globe. In early times it was almost impossible to convey these happening with in short period of time but with the advent of time technology grew exponentially and gave a fast source of communication called "media."

Media has played a very important role throughout. Any event occurring in one side of the globe gets to the other side within a span of minutes. They cover events such as politics, sports, entertainment etc. And telecast it to the other regions. Every event that had occurred in the past has been covered by the regions local and international media. The point lies in the contradicting news telecasted by the media i.e. one event coverage contradicting to the same event covered by another channel.

The process of broadcasting consist of many events such as coverage, filtration, etc. A channel…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Czitrom, Daniel J. Media and the American Mind: From Morse to McLuhan. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1982. Questia. Web. 28 July 2012.

Davis, Richard, and Diana Owen. New Media and American Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Questia. Web. 28 July 2012.

Entman, Robert M., and Kimberly A. Gross. "Race to Judgment: Stereotyping Media and Criminal Defendants." Law and Contemporary Problems 71.4 (2008): 93+. Questia. Web. 28 July 2012.

Fox, Julia R., and Byungho Park. "The "I" of Embedded Reporting: An Analysis of CNN Coverage of the "Shock and Awe" Campaign." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 50.1 (2006): 36+. Questia. Web. 28 July 2012.
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Postcolonial Theory on Imperialism JM Coetzee and Edward Said

Words: 1908 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23155856

Postcolonial Theory on Imperialism

The Strains of Living in a Postcolonial orld

In the wake of Colonialism and Imperialism, much of the world still finds itself in pieces -- unable to remember life before being conquered. hat has resulted is great turmoil in many areas of the world caused by a confusion of cultural identity and a complete lack of national identity. Yet, this move to revive individual cultures has also set off a sharp debate within the field of postcolonial theory; these cultures become protective blankets which then keep nations separated in their own twisted visions. Conquerors such as the United States and Great Britain continue on this bravado of the superior nations who still power over their former colonies. This then results in estern literature romanticizing the East as to reaffirm those chauvinistic beliefs. Thus, the conquered people face a crucial internal dilemma -- adoption into what the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bahri, Deepika. "Introduction to Postcolonial Studies." Department of English. Emory College. 1996. Retrieved 9 Dec 2008 at http://www.english.emory.edu/Bahri/Intro.html.

McLeod, John. "Postcolonial Fictions of Adoption." Critical Survey. 18(2). 2006. 45-63.

McCormack, Brian. "Postcolonialism in an Age of Globalization: Opening International

Relations Theory to Identities in Movement." Alternatives: Global, Local, Political. 27(1). 2002. 99-136.
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Globalization U S Imperialism

Words: 2188 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95726138

globalization and imperialism and argues that globalization is actually nothing more than imperialism under a new guise. The writer uses several sources to illustrate the definition of imperialism and then holds it against globalization to prove they are one and the same under different names. There were nine sources used to complete this paper.

Globalization = U.S. Imperialism

As mankind continues with the process of globalization, many world leaders point to it as an indication of peace on earth. Proudly discussing the coming together of nations, cultures, ideas and technology, the leaders of the world relay to their constituents that globalization is a positive step toward worldwide cohesiveness. Those who live in the nations, taking part in the process, look at technological advances, the ability to widen their market bases and other things and wholeheartedly agree with what they are being told. While there are many aspects of globalization that…… [Read More]

References

Risks of globalization stressed during Second Committee Debate; Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs participates in Question and Answer Session with Delegations.

The Real Reasons for War In Yugoslavia: Backing up Globalization with Military Might.

Imperialism and Globalization.

The possibility of deteriorializing democracy: Agonistic democratic politics and the APEC NGO forums.(Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation)(non-governmental organizations)
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Globalization Western Imperialism

Words: 4372 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49235186

Globalization=Western Imperialism

Modern science and all the various process that are involved with the modernization process evolved because of the progress made by the western countries and the progress made in the field of science, medicine and the notions held in respect of human rights and liberty. There are several sections of individuals who state that dissatisfaction that people seem to have is that they are troubled with their daily life. But when analyzing we can realize that the actual dissatisfaction of individuals arises forms the modern life that they need and in comparison to that the others around the world lead. The term globalization is used to describe the various changes that have taken place in the social, economical and political scenarios that has brought about change in the current situation.

To explain, globalization is the termed used to describe the technique in which the various far away parts…… [Read More]

References

Barlow, Maude and Clake, Tony. Global Showdown. Toronto: Stoddart, 2001.p.66-68

Clarkson, Stephen. Uncle Sam and Us: Globalization, Neoconservatism, and the Canadian State, Univ of Toronto Pr; September 2002, p.21

Ellwood, Wayne. The No-Nonsense Guide to Globalization. New Internationalist Publications Ltd., 2001, p. 14

Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development (Princeton 1995), Chapter 5, pp. 192-211.
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Plato's Viewpoint on Imperialism During

Words: 5749 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16078979

It is very dark in the cave, and everything, including the face of the person next to them, is in deep shadows. It is never mentioned whether the people are happy or sad, or whether they speak to each other. It is assumed that they speak at least enough to put names to the shadows they see on the far wall. According to some, the chains that bind the prisoners represent human senses, and the cave and the way they see it represents human life. Behind them is a fire, and there are people moving around between the fire and the people that are chained, so that the shadows are cast on the back wall of the cave for the chained people to observe. The only bright spot in the cave is the fire, and the only things for the people to watch are the shadows. They cannot turn around…… [Read More]

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Lenin on Imperialism Carrying the

Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40709232



In Lenin's view, 19th century industrialized colonialism was different than previous colonial endeavors in that it was far more economically driven: nations had once used colonies as political and military buffers against their enemies. Now they needed colonies to ensure that the system that enabled the capitalist elites to prosper would survive. Without colonies, the capitalist system would topple. Lenin was prescient in seeing that colonialism made the world inherently unstable -- secret alliances and colonial conflicts were two of the major causes of World War I. Ironically, the Cold War would also be spawned by a kind of colonialist conflict -- not only did the Soviet Union strive to use Eastern Europe as a political buffer, it also economically exploited many of the Eastern European nations in its sphere of influence and forced members of the Warsaw Pact to adopt the Soviet economic system. (Lenin pointed out that colonies…… [Read More]

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Ethnic Strife and Historic Imperialism

Words: 1191 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70126554

The faith allows for stoning of people, torture of women and the suicide bombings that the world has grown accustomed to suffering (Hoagland, 2001).

Islamic fundamentalist believe that their faith instructs them to seek out and destroy Americans. They also believe that if they are suicide bombers they will be rewarded in heaven ten fold. As America continues to fight against the human rights violations that Persian Gulf nations continue to support, the fundamentalists believe it is their calling and duty to act against American interests. They want American interests out of their area and they will do what it takes to get it done including acts of terrorism.

As the world watched in wonder the Soviet Union collapsed. It dismantled its government, it started over and it began to rebuild as a democracy after many years of being in a cold war with the United States.

For some the…… [Read More]

References

Farrar, L.L., Jr.(2003) Aggression vs. apathy: the limits of nationalism during the Balkan wars, 1912-1913. East European Quarterly

Hoagland, Jim (2001) Mysteries in the Persian Gulf. The Washington Post

Novotny, Patrick (1999) the Post-Cold War Era, the Persian Gulf War, and the Peace and Justice Movement in the 1990s. Social Justice nuclear terrorism (Accessed 5-17-07)

http://www.ucsusa.org/global_security/nuclear_terrorism
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Korean-American Journal Entry Korean-Americans Have

Words: 1232 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12361511

My father's parents first operated a Laundromat, then a small general store. My father is now a civil engineer.

School was always a priority in my household. I did not have to work in a family business like my parents, but it was always expected that I would get high marks and devote my attention to keeping at the top of my class and pursuing extracurricular activities that were valuable and enriching, including soccer and music. However, this did not mean there I had no fun as a child. I have many happy memories of my family watching my sports games and concerts and preparing traditional foods with my grandmothers.

Sometimes the pressure I felt was quite intense. My parents had succeeded against all the odds and were determined that I would succeed as well. However, I felt that I needed to pursue a different path. ather than going to…… [Read More]

References

Korean-American History. (2010). Curriculum guide: Unit 1. Retrieved August 6, 2010 at http://apa.si.edu/Curriculum%20Guide-Final/unit1.htm

Rusling, Matt. (2006, April 21). Comics stoke Japanese-Korean tensions. Asian Times Online.

Retrieved August 6, 2010 at  http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/HD21Dh01.html
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The Ripple Effects of American

Words: 4742 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5699076


In this encouragement, American would help to touch off something
perhaps all the more miraculous given the proximity to its oppression to
the European peasantry at large. First in the doctrines which would be
formulated in the wake of French independence and secondly in the way that
Napoleon Bonaparte would begin the spread of such doctrines to a continent
driven by inequality, America's revolution could be said to have been the
opening round in the deconstruction of colonialism and feudalism throughout
Europe and thus, the world.
Drafted in the image of the American Declaration of Independence,
though perhaps more ambitious and sweeping even in its trajectories, the
Declaration of the Rights of Men would dictate a universal principle
arguing that all men are born equal and that any distinctions made between
men according to the social conditions must be terms agreed upon by all
parties. The constitutional document underscoring the…… [Read More]

Works Cited
Center for History and New Media (CHNM). (2005). Monarchy Embattled.
George Mason University. Online at
.

Chew, Robin. (2004). Napoleon I: Emperor of the French. Lucid Caf?.
Online at http://www.lucidcafe.com/library/95aug/napoleon.html.

Locke, John. (2003). Two Treatise of Government, 14th. ed. Cambridge
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Slavery Colonialism and Imperialism to Inclusion and Exclusion

Words: 2169 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10697586

Inclusion Exclusion

Blassingame, John W. 1979. The slave community: plantation life in the antebellum South. New York: Oxford University Press.

The most overt explanation of the author's research problem is when he states: "To argue, as some scholars have, that the first slaves suffered greatly from the enslavement process because it contradicted their 'heroic' warrior tradition, or that it was easier for them because Africans were docile in nature and submissive, is to substitute mythology for history," (p. 4).

The struggles of African slaves are the topic for Blassingame's entire book, and it is impossible to indicate one page number describing all the travails that are detailed in the tome. However, the first chapter of the book does provide examples of the suffering of slaves in Africa, during the transatlantic voyages, and in the New World. Pages 6 and 7 describe in some detail the brutality of the slave boat…… [Read More]

References

Blassingame, John W. 1979. The slave community: plantation life in the antebellum South. New York: Oxford University Press.

Center of the American West. "About Patty Limerick." Retrieved online:  http://centerwest.org/about/patty 

Duke University Libraries (n.d). Biography of John Hope Franklin. Retrieved online: http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/franklin/bio.html

Franklin, John Hope, and Alfred A. Moss. 2000. From slavery to freedom: a history of African-Americans. New York: A.A Knopf
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African-American in the Media the Comedy Barbershop

Words: 854 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62419138

African-American in the Media

The comedy Barbershop, starring Ice Cube juxtaposes the harshness of city life with the resiliency of the people living in the city. The movie with its black cast has an impressive standing in the movie industry for the year 2002. I'm not sure that I agree that this specific film means a breakthrough for African-Americans in the industry. The Black person has after all been part of the industry for a long time, and there are many African-American stars, not featured in this movie, who have made a great success of their movie careers.

The "integration period" for example is determined to be around the years 1949-1969. During this period there is an integration of Black people into the societies depicted in films. Thus the African-American is portrayed in a more positive way. Also, "black" themes and issues of conflict among races and peers are depicted…… [Read More]

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The Portrayal of Asian American Women

Words: 2428 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77844325

Representation of Asian Women: American Television Sitcoms and Media

Introduction

American Asian women exist within a culture that is at times resistant at providing a realistic portrait of what an Oriental woman is and how she expresses herself. This can be seen in personalities like Margaret Cho, whose sitcom, All-American Girl forced her to see the reality of how America perceived Asian American women and Oriental people in general. These negative images, stereotypes of Asian American women as 'demon women', 'hookers', and submissive, are translated not just in television sitcoms, but in movies like Ghost in the Shell and force cultivation of beliefs that stick to the minds of people long-term. It is through these shows and movies that people understand what is an Asian American and unfortunately, how badly they are depicted. This essay will shed some light on the potential origins of these negative stereotypes and why they…… [Read More]

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Comparing Imperialism

Words: 2821 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67188883

European exploration the world was undertaken in the 1500's in an attempt to reach the markets of Asia. And once they reached the East, the Europeans quickly found that their technological superiority gave them a strategic advantage over the Asian countries they encountered. As a result, the West began a period of Colonial Imperialism whereby European nations, followed later by the Americans, occupied and administered entire regions of Asia as colonies to be economically exploited. The Asian countries of India, China, and Japan reacted differently in response to the predations of the West, with differing results. India was completely conquered, China ended up conquered to a degree, and Japan started conquering. These three different results were in due, partially because of the stability of their nations, and partially due to the ability of each to adapt and modernize.

The origins of British rule in India began with the British East…… [Read More]

References

Beeching, J. (1975). The Chinese Opium Wars. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Busch, N. (1972) The Horizon Concise History of Japan. New York: American Heritage Pub.

Danielou, A. (2003) A Brief History of India. Rochester, VT.: Inner Traditions.

Dugdale-Pointon, TDP. (2004, September 19), The Boxer Rebellion, 1900,  http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/wars_boxer.html .
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Range of Future Options Available to American and Global Workers

Words: 932 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9689569

Global Workforce

There is a lack of regulation to protect the ability of American workers to secure well-paying, decent jobs, which form the backbone of the middle class. There are a great number of threats to the stability of the American middle class as more and more businesses make decisions that are to the benefit of their profitability than to the welfare of their workers. Opportunity, health and wealth are most certainly spread equitably on a global level, nor can they be while countries that have been the dominant social and economic forces since WWII set the global agenda for to benefit their own middle class workers to the exclusion of the subsistence workers of underdeveloped nations. The policies are set through international policies including trade agreements, United Nations policy briefings, and regional agreements. Countries with little bargaining power are unable to influence the international policies which are set to…… [Read More]

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British Imperialism on Display

Words: 811 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29221048

Shooting an Elephant - Orwell

I clearly got the impression that Orwell was caught between a rock and a hard place, to understate the situation. He raged at the Burma residents who hated the British and took it out on British police -- and on the other hand, he knew imperialism was a bad policy and he did not have positive thoughts at all about his duty in a British uniform. I was very attentive to his narrative, and I was impressed too that the narrator knew he was "ill-educated" (which is quite an admission) and was living day-to-day with rage and hatred.

My predictions for the rest of the essay include the thought that the protagonist will not be able to handle the situation well at all. First of all, I hate it that elephants are chained up and made to do humans' work, and I can't blame that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Orwell, George. "Shooting an Elephant." 1936.
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Postcolonial Geography Post-Colonial Geography Questions

Words: 2507 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16647719



Question 3:

In some regards, the idea of 'culture' is highly mutable and subject to widespread variations in characterization. Quite in fact, the concept of culture is highly implicated in the weaponzation of words that may be used by one nation to subjugate another. Ideas about how cultures interact, about which cultures are superior and indeed about whether or not the practices of some peoples should even be called 'cultures' have been subjected to rationalization as colonialist nations have subjugated various parts of the developing sphere. It is this understanding that inclines Said's (2002) perspective in "The Clash of Definitions."

Here, Said opposes the idea that there are distinct incompatibilities which persist between civilizations. Instead, he argues that this is the impression which has been foisted upon us by the shifting notions of what is meant by culture, particularly as this depends upon the perspective of hegemonic ethnic groups. This…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bederman, G. (1995). Manliness & Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bender, T. (2006). A Nation among Nations: America's Place in World History. New York: Hill & Wang:

Cabral, A. (1973). National Liberation and Culture. In Return to the Source: Selected Speeches of Amilcar Cabral. New York: Monthly Review Press: 39-56.

McClintock, A. (1995). Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. London: Routledge.
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Fresia's Contention That the United States Failed

Words: 2259 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37724969

Fresia's contention that the United States failed to live up to its revolutionary democratic promise and instead was captured by the powerful plutocratic elite has appeal, it oversimplifies the process by which the elite take and retain control over resources and governmental power. In reality, at the time of the American evolution, there was little dispute that the outcome of the evolution would be to give greater power and freedom to those leading the evolution; the founding fathers. While the promise of democracy was offered to common men, it was members of the ruling elite of the colonial Americas that made the decisions to declare America independent from England and drafted both the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution. Therefore, it is unsurprising that the Constitution does not engage in the type of re-distribution of wealth that Fresia appears to believe is necessary in order to establish a…… [Read More]

Referenced

Fresia, Jerry. 1988. Toward an American Revolution: Exposing the Constitution and other

Illusions. Boston: South End Press.
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Theodore Roosevelt and Two Identifications

Words: 1480 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7685900

Theodore Roosevelt

Writing Guidelines for History Identifications and Essays

Your essay should have an introductory paragraph that in some way summarizes, encapsulates, suggests, shapes, and/or sets up the ideas, themes, facts, or whatever you are going to discuss in the main body of your essay. In other words, you should set forth your thesis.

Here, in the main body of your essay, you should develop the principal ideas and themes, and support them with the appropriate facts. The main body will inevitably be several paragraphs long, perhaps a page or two or more, depending on what you want to say and the amount of material you include. Basically, the main body consists of as many paragraphs as you need to discuss the question at hand.

Also let me note that individual paragraphs generally begin with a topic sentence for that paragraph, follow that by a couple of sentences of development,…… [Read More]

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Boot's Book the Savage Wars

Words: 4627 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8985217

In short, the United States became more aggressive in attaining foreign resources and access to trade. This was a result of the expansive nature of empires, and the fact that America, as characterized by Boot, was gradually becoming a "great power."

Largely, the Great Powers of the modern world have come into being as emerging economic and political trends have allowed. The ever shifting tides of the world's social foundations have tended to produce successive powers that rise and fall over the course of history. Generally, what make these powers great are their military capabilities, but of course, these are commanded by the economic base supporting them. A powerful economy can allow for enormous military expenditures, and generate vast influence across the planet.

Naturally, the economic crux of a great power can vary in form. Most obviously, the great power of the ancient world -- Rome -- relied upon the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boot, Max. The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power. New York: Basic Books, 2002.
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End Game of Globalization Nothing Is More

Words: 2052 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5458185

End Game of Globalization

"Nothing is more insidious than the liberal fain of equality between people who are demonstrably and desperately unequal…American liberalism, in other words, remade itself to fulfill the task that social democracy fulfilled elsewhere. It became a progressive force, absorbing yet dampening the leftward impulse of socialism…a liberalism quite at home with racism and class exploitation, yet one which responded when necessary to political pressure (as in the granting of female suffrage). Liberalism expanded into a bipolar role of co-opting any progressive urge among the multiracial working class while also viciously repressing that same force when it organized too much of a challenge to the power of capital or the liberal state."

~Smith, 2005

There are many countries that perceive the United States of America as an example of imperialism. There are many cultures that adamantly resist western culture, western practices, and western ideals. They are enraged…… [Read More]

References:

Smith, Neil. (2005) The End Game of Globalization. Routledge: United Kingdom.
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Hawaiian History in From a Native Daughter

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65602444

Hawaiian History

In From a Native Daughter, Haunani-Kay Trask's purpose could not be clearer in that she has written a highly political and ideological work from a left-wing nationalist perspective that denounces the colonization of Hawai'i by the United States. Even more, every word she wrote is absolutely true, even though many whites either do not know this history or do not want to know it. In fact, they might even wish that Trask had written more about the 'positive' or 'beneficial' side of Hawaiian interaction with the U.S. except of course she finds that there has been none. Her entire history is an expression of moral outrage and indignation and what whites have done to the Native people of these islands, to the air, land and water, and to the history and culture of the Hawaiian people. Most tragically, she describes Hawai'i today as a "dying land," crushed by…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Trask, Haunani-Kay. From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai'i, Revised Edition. University of Hawai'i Press, 1993, 1999.
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Alamo in History in the Making An

Words: 576 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54578405

Alamo," in History in the Making: An Absorbing Look at How American History Has

Changed in the Telling over the Last 200 Years, (New York: The New Press, 2006): 146-151.

The siege of the Alamo is an example of a historical event that has taken on a symbolic significance far in excess of its actual importance. The facts of the Battle of the Alamo are as follows: the outnumbered supporters of Texas independence, garrisoned in the Alamo, were eventually overcome by the Mexican forces. For many years, Texans perceived the Alamo as an example of Texan spirit and determination to secure independence; for the Mexican nation, the loss of Texas became a symbol of American imperialism.

xamples from History in the Making: An Absorbing Look at How American History Has Changed in the Telling over the Last 200 Years show how the American understanding of the Alamo has shifted over…… [Read More]

Examples from History in the Making: An Absorbing Look at How American History Has Changed in the Telling over the Last 200 Years show how the American understanding of the Alamo has shifted over the years. In 1867, the Texas patriot Davy Crockett was portrayed in an ostensibly objective history book as being surrounded by bloodthirsty Mexicans. But, the book said, spirit of Crockett could not die with his body and lived on to inspire others to fight for freedom (146-147). In some history textbooks in the 1880s the Battle of the Alamo was not acknowledged at all, given that the battle ended in defeat. Another textbook noted that although Mexicans triumphed in the battle, American fortitude was simply too strong to withstand the determination of the Texans to secure independence in the long run (148). One textbook from 1915, with clear racial overtones, openly stated that the 'Anglo-Saxon blood' of the Americans and the independent spirit of the frontiersmen inevitably came in conflict with the weak, dictatorial government of Mexico. Well into the 1950s and 1960s, textbooks stressed how the superior numbers of Mexicans (2,400 strong) were held off by the handful of Texans led by William B. Travis, David Crockett, and David Bowie (151)

This one-sided perspective was challenged in the 1990s. "Myths about that battle have magnified the rebel's valor at the Mexican's expense," noted one contemporary textbook (150). A 1995 rendition tried not to take a particular side but presented the facts as dispassionately as possible: 187 rebels did indeed hold off a Mexican assault for days. But the most famous heroes of the conflict -- Davy Crockett included -- did not fight to the death but were rather executed by the Mexican Army after the fact. The book notes that at the time, an equally inspiring event to spur more men to join the Texan independence movement was when a 350 men-strong Texan detachment were killed by the Mexican forces (151). However, it is the memory of the Alamo that has been memorialized in the historical imagination.

However, even this 1995 account is not entirely satisfactory. To understand the determination of Mexico to continue to keep the Texas territory within its national borders, the Mexican-American conflict must be presented as a whole, without undue weight given to the events at the Alamo. The Alamo has become part of the iconography of the taming of the West, and the dominion over the frontier has become synonymous with defeating nonwhite people who symbolize more primitive, less democratic cultures. The fact that the Alamo stood for a long time in a surprising fashion seems to confirm an ideal of American superiority, and by giving it undue weight -- even without racial overtones or inflated language -- tends to confirm this myth in the eyes of students, unless the story is properly contextualized.
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Cuban Missile Crisis

Words: 2970 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46885298

Cuban Missile Crisis: Why we need more balance of power in the world.

Cuban Missile crisis in 1960s may raise a serious political question in retrospect i.e. should America be allowed to exist as the sole superpower and what could be the repercussions of such an existence? Now fifty years or so later, we are in a much better position to answer this question. United States or any other nation for that matter must not work as the sole superpower because it can cause many political upheaval as we recently witnessed. We will discuss the Cuban Missile crisis in detail but first we must establish that American history is fraught with events and wars that were fought on the false belief of America's superiority which made it an imperial power. Examples of these events include the Mexican-American War, the Spanish-American War and not to mention the current conflict with Iraq.…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Rothernberg. R.S. "Crisis Time." USA Today 130.2676 (2001)

Meagher. MR."In an Atmosphere of National Peril': The Development of John F. Kennedy's World View." Presidential Studies Quarterly 27.3 (1997):

Krenn ML. "Robert Weisbrot. Maximum Danger: Kennedy, the Missiles, and the Crisis of American Confidence." International Social Science Review (2002):

Nigro Jr. LJ. "High Noon in the Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis." Parameters 35.3 (2005)
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Ad to Present the Civil

Words: 3003 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24463986

S. responded to the Great Depression by electing FDR, who brought out his Alphabet Programs which were supposed to put the nation back to work with public works projects. When that failed to restore the economy, the world elected to start with a new war: WWII. Germany had been buried by the Western powers following WWI -- and now the country threatened to assert itself once more. Russia was in the middle of its own revolution: Stalin was liquidating the kulaks and rounding others up and shipping them off to the Gulag. That did not help Russia's economy any more than FDR's Alphabet program -- but it did not matter: war was on the horizon. Japan was being strangled by Western powers: the American military-industrial-congressional complex essentially forced Japan to attack -- and then sat back and let it happen when Japan finally decided to bomb Pearl Harbor. Thus, America…… [Read More]

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Bilateral Relations For the Better

Words: 3687 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84770068

All of these together constitute the full relationship, and it is confusing and contradictory" (1998, 3). The cast of public characters included U.S. diplomats, Navy and Marine officers, and congressmen. Private citizens, including bankers, journalists, lobbyists, and businessmen, rounded out the ensemble. All these groups interacted to influence U.S. relations with Trujillo, although rarely in a consolidated fashion. hile the Dominican Republic became a difficult place to do business, a querulous participant in negotiations, and a major cause of Caribbean disquiet, including genocide, war scares, and assassinations" Trujillo still continued to obtain U.S. support (1998, 3). Even after the Trujillo government was overthrown, the U.S. government insisted on maintaining its power over the region by insisting on "approving the new head of the army and keeping the military intact." In short, ashington moved to create a "guardian system" it could control or manipulate (McSherry 2003, 2). The United States support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atkins, Pope and Larm Wilson. 1998. "The Dominican Republic and the United States from Imperialism to Transnationalism." The U.S. And the Americas. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Chester, Eric Thomas. 2001. "Rag-Tags, Scum, Riff-Raff, and Commies: The Intervention in the Dominican Republic 1965-1966. NY Monthly Review Press.

Desmarais P., Norman and James McGovern. "Essential Documents in American History, President Ulysses S. Grant's appeal for the Annexation of Santo Domingo, 1492-Present." Providential College.

Farmer, Richard S. 1985. "Economic Policy Toward the Caribbean Basin: The Balance Sheet." The Journal of Inter-American Studies and World Affairs, Vol. 27, No.1.
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Twain's To the Person Sitting

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26837199

They are so shrouded in mental and spiritual darkness, say the oppressors that they require outside assistance in the form of religious missionaries and military personnel. Christianity and the armies that propagate it are here to help the "Persons Sitting in Darkness," to save them from themselves. Thus, Twain uses the printed word to demonstrate how American foreign policy is founded on principles of social Darwinism and thinly concealed racism.

Throughout "To the Person Sitting in Darkness," Twain concentrates on lambasting the notion that America stands for freedom, liberty, and Civilization. According to Twain, these concepts are "only for Export." Moreover, they are costly. Twain makes sure to bring up the financial motives for American political maneuvers: "The Actual Thing that the Customer Sitting in Darkness buys with his blood and tears and land and liberty." The word "Customer" drives home the point that money, not concern for the well…… [Read More]

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Uprooted The Epic Story of

Words: 2651 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61624327

In each one, he uses descriptive language and situations to represent the millions of uprooted Europeans coming to America for a better life and opportunities unavailable to them at home. He writes, "Now they would learn to have dealings with people essentially different from themselves. Now they would collide with unaccustomed problems, learn to understand alien ways and alien languages, manage to survive in a grossly foreign environment" (Handlin 1973, 35). Throughout the book, he uses this almost sentimental style to illustrate the difficulties these people faced, and how they managed to survive and thrive in spite of them.

He describes the cramped living conditions in urban ghettos where most of the immigrants first ended up, the difficulties in finding employment, and how they always remained separate and separated from the Americans all around them. He writes, "This street was apart as if a ghetto wall defined it. On other…… [Read More]

Bodnar, John. The Transplanted: A History of Immigrants in Urban America. Bloomington, in: University of Indiana Press, 1985.

Handlin, Oscar. The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People. Boston, MA: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1973.

Jacobson, Matthew Frye. Barbarian Virtues: The United States Encounters Foreign Peoples at Home and Abroad, 1876-1917. New York: Hill and Wang, 2000.
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America and the Bay of

Words: 1614 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77940580



One of the best points is brought forth by Higgins, who writes that an estimated force of 1500 men were sent to take on no less than 25,000 Cubans (Higgins 1987). "In the end, of approximately 1300 men who actually landed on the beaches from the Brigade, almost 1200 were captured and about 100 killed in combat (Higgins 149). The Brigade, if they failed, were expected to escape into the protected areas that connected to the Bay of Pigs; when in fact those areas, the conditions of the terrain, the poor training and preparation of the Brigade, made such escape impossible (Higgins 149).

Years later, declassified papers and tapes from the hite House would lend insight into the fiasco, but not clarity. One thing that was evidenced from the hite House tapes is that the Bay of Pigs continued to be a source of humiliation and annoyance to President Kennedy…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105514152

Blight, James G. And Peter Kornbluh, eds. 1999. Politics of Illusion: The Bay of Pigs Invasion Reexamined. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105514456.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24098536

Chomsky, Noam. 1993. Rethinking Camelot: JFK, the Vietnam War, and U.S. Political Culture. Boston: South End Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24098683.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105410509
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America at War 1865-Present a Survey of

Words: 2692 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12649879

America at War 1865-Present

A Survey of America at War from 1865 to Present

Since the Civil War, America has seldom seen a generation of peace. In fact, a nonstop succession of wars has kept what Eisenhower termed "the military industrial complex" in lucrative business. From the Indian Wars to the World Wars to the Cold War to the war on Terror, Americana has expanded its foothold as an imperial power every step of the way -- even when isolationism appeared to be momentarily in vogue following World War I. This paper will look at the history of the progression of war in America from 1865 to present, showing how that history -- through social, economic, literary, political, and religious changes -- has both shaped and been shaped by American foreign and domestic policy.

Unit Once: 1865-1876

The Civil War had just ended on the home front, but that did…… [Read More]

Reference List

Boyd, J.P. (2000). Indian Wars. Scituate, MA: Digital Scanning, Inc.

Jarecki, E. (2008). The American Way of War. NY: Free Press.

Jones, E.M. (2000). Libido Dominandi. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Morehouse, M. (2007). Fighting in the Jim Crow Army: Black Men and Women
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History International Relations

Words: 2464 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50664711

United tates and Fidel Castro's Cuba, now more than forty years old, is still a source of great political and moral contention. The collapse of the oviet Union and, with it, the end of the Cold War, signaled a change in the implications of the type of socialism governing Cuba. The alleged threats that had hovered so close to the continental U.. throughout these paranoid and dangerous days of ideological impasse were now neutralized by the dismantling of the infrastructure that had brandished them. Cuba, once a unique and remote ally to the U...R., served as an outpost for anti-American hostilities and a potential vessel through which to deliver the devastating blows that may have turned the Cold War hot, now is an isolated bastion for ideals abandoned by most of the world. In the Western Hemisphere, they are alone, paying for what most American citizens will tell you is…… [Read More]

Sources can be found and printed at the following sites:

Source 1. http://www.state.gov/www/regions/wha/cuba/policy.html

Source 2. http://travel.state.gov/cuba.html

Source 3.  http://qbanrum.tripod.com/cuba-1.html 

Source 4.  http://isla.igc.org/Features/Cuba/cuba2.html
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Mahan and Turner and U S

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71591113

hat he postulated was that their greatness came from the control of the sea, especially the vital sea lanes and points, such as coaling stations for the steamship navies of the world. He felt that this had never been fully appreciated before and that it was his job to expound upon it.

His work began in lecture format and later found its way into published book form. This led to his publication of The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783 which became a classic text and basis for American imperialism. This and other succeeding works pounded home the need for a strong battleship navy to control the critical lines of communication for a maritime empire. Unlike many proponents of U.S. overseas involvement, Mahan did not coat his ideas in philosophically pleasing clothing. Very much the Social Darwinist, he had no problems arguing that in a world of struggle for…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Burner, David; Bernhard, Virginia and Stanley I. Kutler. A History of the United States.

6th Combined Edition. St. James: Brandywine Press, 2000. 661.

Nash, Gary B.; Jeffrey, Julie Roy; Howe, John R. et al. The American People: Creating

a Nation and a Society. 5th Edition. New York: Longman, 2001. 639.
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Popular Space

Words: 1168 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67346758

spanned Old Highway 31, Broadway, State Route 119, High Street, and even the Champs-Elysees. They have elicited feelings of mouth-watering salvation from children in the backseat of cars for generations and tugged on the deeply imprinted visions of the American Dream from the adults in the front; having visited them already, adolescents on the streets of American cities clutch the greasy paper bags on the way home from school, gabbing with their friends and sharing their French fries; in downtown New York, they grace Wall Street with a top-hatted, white-gloved greeter at the front door. The Golden Arches permeate American culture, all walks of life, classes, ethnicities, social stratii, and geographies in a way that no other commercial space has. McDonald's, a leader in the worldwide fast food industry, has capitalized on its commercial ingenuity, successful marketing, globalization, and place in the American imagination by careful recognition of the cultural…… [Read More]

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U S Foreign Policy in the

Words: 3807 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40345638

eapons of mass destruction are just an excuse. But is known that
"President George Bush and Vice-President Dick Cheney were both oil
company executives before entering politics, as was half the present US
administration," which means that not only do you have friends in the oil
business but that they dictate your policy (Vesely 2002). Having such
deceptive and underhanded policies and engaging an entire nation in a war
that not only kills Amerians, but also people of other countries and
encourages anti-American sentiment among even our allies is a horrible
foreign policy when all we receive in return is natural resources and
riches for a few Americans. Alternatives must be sought. No longer can
weapons of mass destruction be an excuse to involve the United States in
such costly polices.
And yet even more so now weapons of mass destruction are being hinted
at as an excuse to go…… [Read More]

Works Cited
Buckley Jr., William. "Looking Ahead-Oil." National Review (2005). 17 Apr.
2007
333457>.

"Imperialism Definition." Dictionary.Com. 17 Apr. 2007
.
Lewis, Bernard. "Did You Say 'American Imperialism'? : Power, Weakness, and
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Globalization is not Americanization

Words: 2534 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20372620

Globalization arguably began even before Marco Polo’s expeditions, possibly being traceable to Alexander the Great’s establishment of overland routes between Eastern Europe and India. The assumption that globalization equals Americanization is profoundly arrogant, and is also ignorant of the history, meaning, and implications of globalization. Globalization implies integration and interdependence of the world. Predating the United States of America, globalization nevertheless reached a peak in the 20th century, when a globalized economic, political, and cultural landscape became inevitable and entrenched. While it seemed that McDonald’s, Coca Cola, Shell, and other proudly American companies have dominated the corporate landscape of a globalized international economy, a wealth of non-American companies have likewise participated in the dissemination and distribution of ideas and neoliberal policies that characterize postmodern globalization.

In some ways, globalization is the antithesis of Americanization. As Collins (2015) points out, globalization “has led to the continuing deindustrialization of America,” as labor…… [Read More]