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Cognitive Processes the Development of

Words: 1624 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46665013

As a conclusion, the authors suggest a functional architecture of cognitive emotional control. The review ends with suggestions for future study, including a consideration of cultural differences and their effect on the individual's ability to control emotion in a cognitive way.

Since the study is a review, the research methodology involves an overview of recent studies in the field of cognitive emotional control. The researchers appear to have made thorough work of this purpose, while also offering insight and into potential future applications of such research. Furthermore, their synthesis of research information is logical and relevant to the questions posed at the beginning of the document.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is always fascinating to consider the different ways and preference types in how individuals might view and experience the world around them. Having an understanding of cognitive types is particularly useful in fields like education and leadership. Such an understanding…… [Read More]

References

Felder, R.M. And Brent, R. (2005). Understanding Student Differences. Journal of Engineering Education, Vol. 94, No. 1. Retrieved from: http://eprints.me.psu.ac.th/ILS/info/Understanding_Differences.pdf

Kay, W.K., Francis, L.J., and Robbins, M. (2011). A distinctive leadership for a distinctive network of churches? Psychological type theory and the apostolic networks. University of Warwick. Retrieved from:  http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/41317/1/WRAP_Francis_Psychological_type_and_Apostolic_networks_final_version.pdf 

Nardi, D. (2007). The 8 Jungian Cognitive Processes. Retrieved from:  http://www.keys2cognition.com/cgjung.htm 

Ochsner, K.N. And Gross, J.J. (2005, May). The cognitive control of emotion. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 9, No. 5. Retrieved from:  http://icdl.com/graduate/Portal/IMH212/documents/ochsner-gross.pdf
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Cognitive and Affective Psychology According

Words: 2587 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25257859

The psychotherapist's role is then to enhance the already existing tools to help those who need it develop their intelligence and problem-solving abilities in order to promote the healing process.

Question 2

1:

Both the cognitive and affective domains are important considerations within psychotherapy. Indeed, the two often function within a causal relationship to each other. In the Communicative Theory of emotion, as expounded by Brett et al. (2003), for example, emotions are directly related to conscious or unconscious cognitive evaluations. These cognitive evaluations then cause an emotional response, which might include happiness, sadness, or anger. The subconscious internalization of the original cognitive evaluation and accompanying emotion could then result in behavior-related problems such as prejudice. Sometimes such behavior problems are so deeply seated that they need to be treated by means of psychotherapy.

Cognitive therapy, as explained by Michael Herkov (2010), acknowledges the relationship between thought (the cognitive aspect)…… [Read More]

References

AudioEnglish.net. (2010). Cognitive Neuroscience.  http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/cognitive_neuroscience.htm 

Brett, a., Smith, M., Price, E., & Huitt, W. (2003). Overview of the affective domain. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved [date], from http:/www.edpsycinteractive.org/brilstar/chapters/affectdev.doc

Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.  http://web.uvic.ca/psyc/tuokko/Ethical%20Principles%20of%20Psychologists.pdf 

Eysenck, Michael W. & Keane, Mark T. (2005). Cognitive Psychology: a student's handbook. East Sussex: Psychology Press Ltd.
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Cognitive Processes of Cognitive Processes

Words: 1855 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 78409228

124).

The methodology used was to study a selected group of children. While the results are useful in examining this cognitive process, it could also be argued that the group was too small to make general assessments and that further studies would have to be undertaken to compare the results of this study over a wider range of children. This would also take into account other variables such as ethnic group etc.

3. Conclusion

The study of cognitive process provides us with valuable insight into the way that children and adults perceive the word around them. The way that we perceive, filter and retain our reality plays a vital part in the way that we react and behave and in our personal development. The issues of perception, sensory memory and social cognitive factors all play a cardinal role in human development. The more that we study and understand the various…… [Read More]

References

Cropley, A.J. (1999). Creativity and Cognition: Producing Effective Novelty'. Roeper Review, 21(4), 253. Retrieved June 18, 2009, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001272839 

Garfield, J.L. (1990). Foundations of Cognitive Science: The Essential Readings (1st ed.). New York: Paragon House. Retrieved June 18, 2009, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=76868168 

Glass et al., ( 2008) Auditory sensory memory in 2-year-old children: an event-related potential study. Neuroreport, 19(5), pp 569-73.

Hung, D. (2003). Supporting Current Pedagogical Approaches with Neuroscience Research. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 14(2), 129+.
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Cognitive Development

Words: 1516 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25723502

Cognitive Development

Jean Piage is a luminary as far as cognitive development theory goes. This is because of his contributions in his intellectual development theory. According to Piaget, intellectual development is a continuation of innate biological processes. He emphasizes that children go through four sequential processes of development. These four stages also occur with sub stages within them.

The sensory motor stage: 0 to 2 years; intuitive stage: 2 to 7 years; concrete operations stage: 7 to 11 years; and the formal operations stage: 11 to 15 years (Simatwa, 366).

hat "Active Construction of Knowledge and Understanding" Means

A person's way of understanding occurs in five ways that are related. These are referred to as cognition domains. These ways include understanding as a representation, understanding as connectivity between knowledge types, understanding that forms active knowledge construction and understanding as cognition situation. Understanding as a representation refers to owning internalized ideas,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aleven, Vincent and Koeginger, Kenneth. "An Effective Metacognitive Strategy: Learning by Doing and Explaining with A Computer-Based Cognitive Tutor." Cognitive Science, 26 (2002): 147-179. Print.

Casey, Betty, Jones, Rebecca, and Hare, Todd. "The Adolescent Brain." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1124 (2008): 111-126. Print.

Hill, Patrick and Lapsley, Daniel. "Egocentrism." Education.com,  http://www.education.com/reference/article/egocentrism/ . Accessed 23 August 2016.

Hurst, Melissa. "Differences between Piaget and Vygotsky's Cognitive Development Theories." Study.com,  http://study.com/academy/lesson/differences-between-piaget-vygotskys - cognitive-development-theories.html. Accessed 23 August 2016.
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Cognitive Testing Tool

Words: 2446 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 55190613

Cognitive Ability Testing

Psychological testing or psychological assessment is the strategy that psychologists use to determine the core component of individual personality, cognitive ability and IQ (intelligence quotient). It is the process of identifying individual strengths and weakness. In essence, cognitive ability is one of the important strategies for the psychological assessment. Traditionally, cognitive ability assessment primarily involves the use of pencil and paper to determine a wide range of individual abilities that include problem solving, intellectual functioning, language skills, and memory. With the advanced development of information technology, there is an increase in the use of computer technology to carry out the assessment. The cognitive testing uses both qualitative and quantitative approach to determine individual cognitive ability, and the results are interpreted based on the normative data collected.

Objective of this study is to carry out the assessment of cognitive ability of students and non-students using the Cognitive Abilities…… [Read More]

Reference

Aiken, L.R. & Groth-Marnat, G. (2006). Psychological assessment and Psychological testing, (12th ed.).Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN: 0205457428.

Bermingham D, Hill RD, Woltz D, Gardner MK (2013) Cognitive Strategy Use and Measured Numeric Ability in Immediate- and Long-Term Recall of Everyday Numeric Information. PLoS ONE 8(3).

Lakin, J.M. (2012).Multidimensional ability tests in the linguistically and culturally diverse students: The Evidence of the measurement invariance. Learning and Individual Differences. 22(3):397-403.

Lohman, D.F. (2006). The Woodcock-Johnson III and the Cognitive Abilities Test (Form 6): A Concurrent Valid Study. University of Iowa.
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Cognitive Behavior Abilities in Men and Women

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76443144

Cognitive Behavior Abilities in Men and Women

Three major differences cognitive behavior abilities men women: higher verbal abilities, higher spatial abilities, higher arithmetical abilities

Neuropsychologists and psychologists have widely analyzed the difference in cognitive abilities expressed by members of the male and female genders. The analysis of these professionals has revealed the existence of three major cognitive differences between the genders. The differences include higher verbal abilities in women; higher arithmetic abilities in males and higher spatial abilities in males. However, the possession of superior arithmetic abilities by males has been closely related their possession of top notch spatial abilities. This implies that the differences in cognitive abilities can be condensed or summarized into two.

Close look at the differences in verbal abilities among males and females reveal that women perform best in verbal tests as compared to their male counterparts. Additionally, a woman's language development cycle is faster than…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, P.L. (2006). Cognitive sex differences and mathematics and science achievement. American Psychologist, 61(7), 722-723.

Ballinger, T.P., Hudson, E., Karkoviata, L., & Wilcox, N.T. (2011). Saving behavior and cognitive abilities. Experimental Economics, 14 (3), 349-374.
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Science and Religion One of

Words: 1299 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24659261



This type of evolutionary thinking will challenge the initial creationist act as well. Many creationist currents, including the Christian one, believe that human life was also created through divine intervention, so any kind of such approach where life actually evolved to form the human being along the way takes away the special characteristics of human kind, as perceived by Christianity, for example. So, evolutionism virtually challenges the entire theological belief on the history of Earth and its inhabitants.

4. Logical positivism is based on general skepticism towards mythology, theology or metaphysics and on the idea that all true facts can and have to be verified in order to become veridical. In this sense, besides empiricism and materialism, verificationism is also one of the pillars on which logical positivism is based.

For a fact, proposition or idea to be cognitively meaningful, it has to be able to follow a particular path…… [Read More]

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Cognitive Bias and Social Desirability Bias in

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44284874

Cognitive bias and Social Desirability Bias in esearch Study

Cognitive Bias

Exercise 1: Impact of cognitive biases on the research process.

Cognitive bias is an individual's tendency to base an opinion or decision on inconsistent perception or knowledge of research data. Cognitive bias may cause either a success or failure of a project. The nature of decisions by the researcher may contribute to the success or failure of the research project. A direct effect or impact is that, cognitive bias can cause significant negative impacts on the perception of projects risks. Cognitive bias has direct impacts on the research process, and it is easy to identify the impacts of cognitive bias based on the previous or past information applied in carrying out research. According to Haselton, Nettle and Andrews (2005:724-746), cognitive bias is an error in judgment caused by memory, societal ascription, and arithmetical errors. These errors are common to…… [Read More]

References

Brewer, M.B. 1979. In-group bias in the minimal intergroup situation: A cognitive-motivational analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 86, 307 -- 324

Fisher, R.J. 1993. "Social Desirability Bias and the Validity of Indirect Questioning." The Journal of Consumer Research. 20: 303-315.

Haselton MG, Nettle D, and Andrews PW. The evolution of cognitive bias. The handbook of evolutionary psychology, 2005:724-746.

Leggett, C.G., N. Kleckner, K. Boyle, J. Duffield, and R. Mitchell. 2003. "Social Desirability Bias in Contingent Valuation Surveys Administered Through In-Person Interview." Land Economics 11:561-575.
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Cognitive Changes Developmental Cognitive Occur Starting Age

Words: 2472 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19195806

Cognitive Changes

Developmental cognitive occur starting age 50 moving end life.

Developmental and cognitive changes

The essay aims at exploring the developmental and cognitive changes that occur starting at the age of fifty years moving through end of life. The developmental changes are easily noticeable or observable, hence not much of literature or scholarly articles have been written about it. On the other hand a lot of materials, studies and researches have been conducted on cognitive changes because cognition is a key requirement needed in both the young and old to meet the job demands, challenges of education and day-to-day life of an individual (MacDonald, Hultsch, & Dixon, 2003, p 32-52).

Before the essays embark on the changes that occur at the age of fifty and beyond its important to consider the early changes right from when a baby is born up to middle life for us to understand the…… [Read More]

References

Anstey, K., Hofer, S., & Luszcz, A., (2003). Cross-sectional and longitudinal patterns of differentiation in late-life cognitive and sensory function: The effects of age, ability, attrition, and occasion of measurement. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 132, 470 -- 487.

Ball, K., et al. (2002). Effects of cognitive training, interventions with older adults. Journal of the American Medical Association, 288, 2271 -- 2281.

Dixon, R., De Frias, M., & Maitland, S.B. (2001). Memory in midlife. In M.E. Lachman (Ed.), Handbook of midlife development New York: Wiley (pp. 248 -- 278)...

Finkel, D., Pedersen, N.L., & Harris, J.R. (2000). Genetic mediation of the association among motor and perceptual speed and adult cognitive abilities. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 7, 141 -- 155.
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Cognitive Unconscious by John F Kihlstrom 1987

Words: 1291 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71149554

Cognitive Unconscious, by John F. Kihlstrom (1987) addresses the idea that many processes and mental structures that affect what happens in a person's conscious mind are actually processed in the unconscious mind. That would mean that a lot of the things people do, they are doing based on information they may be processing without realizing it (Kihlstrom, 1987). In other words, people take in information about the world around them all the time, but much of it is unconscious information they do not realize they are collecting. Even though they have not realized the collection of this information, they use the information to help them make decisions and to determine how they feel about things (Kihlstrom, 1987). There has been a great deal of past research that does indicate mental functions can be altered by information that was provided subliminally or even under hypnosis, as opposed to information the person…… [Read More]

References

Fernald, L.D. (2008). Psychology: Six perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Gazzaniga, M. (2010). Psychological science. NY: W.W. Norton & Company.

Kihlstrom, J.F. (1987). The cognitive unconscious. Science, 237(4821): 1445-1452.

Sun, R. (2008). The Cambridge handbook of computational psychology. NY: Cambridge University Press.
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Cognitive-Based Therapy

Words: 1383 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4291134

CBT

The always developing field of psychology and the tools used to develop this science, have provided many patients with much need relief. The constant evolution of the mind requires that clinical practices within mental health treatments also evolve and grow with the human race. The purpose of this essay is to discus Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), as a useful method of treating mental and psychological issues.

First CBT will be discussed in general, and useful ideas presented about the approach will be introduced. A practical example of this therapy will also be highlighted to contextualize the information. Next, this essay will address CBT can be used specifically for the treatment for depression and the issues associated with that idea. Finally, this essay will address how computerized CBT software programs are assisting in treating these types of issues.

CBT

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is simply a form of psychotherapy that…… [Read More]

References

Barlow, DH, Gorman, J.M., Shear, M.K., & Woods, S.W. (2000). Cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine, or their combination for panic disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Jama, 283(19), 2529-2536.

Boyes, A. (2012). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques That Work. Psychology Today, 6 Dec 2012. Retrieved from  http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201212/cognitive-behavioral-therapy-techniques-work 

Dobson, K.S. (Ed.). (2009). Handbook of cognitive-behavioral therapies. Guilford Press.

Martin, B. (2007). In-Depth: Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Psych Central. Retrieved from  http://psychcentral.com/lib/in-depth-cognitive-behavioral-therapy/000907
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Cognitive Deficits in Amyotrophic Sclerosis

Words: 2919 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59314852

, 2010).

In addition, small frequent feeds, and a large amount of fluid is provided to maintain the nutritional needs of the patient and prevent dehydration. The r suctioning of secretions proves necessary in preventing aspiration of secretions. The loss of voluntary muscle's activity increases the risks of accumulation of secretions hence, the need for regular suctioning. Bulbar involvement often results in communication complications such as dysarthria and muscle paralysis of the muscles of the face, throat, and tongue. As such, it requires the provision of management strategies such as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques and other forms of speech therapy that improves the communication abilities of patients with ALS. Pseudobulbar effects that often accompany those brought by the frontotemporal lobe degeneration often require the administration of antidepressants. The antidepressants manage mood disorder that presents through disproportionate crying, and inappropriate response to the external stimuli. Maximizing patients' comfort and…… [Read More]

References

Brettschneider, J., Libon, D.J., Toledo, J.B., Xie, S.X., McCluskey, L., Elman, L., & #8230;

Trojanowski, J.Q. (2012). Microglial activation and TDP-43 pathology correlate with executive dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Acta Neuropathologica, 123(3),

395 -- 407. doi:10.1007/s00401-011-0932-x

Crespi, C., Cerami, C., Dodich, a., Canessa, N., Arpone, M., Iannaccone, S., & #8230; Cappa, S.F. (2014). Microstructural white matter correlates of emotion recognition impairment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Cortex, 53, 1 -- 8
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Cognitive Behavioral Theories of Counseling

Words: 805 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96370221

Psychology -- Cognitive theoies

Use of the Session Bidging Woksheet in Cognitive Theapy

The pupose of the Session Bidging Woksheet is to assess the client's insight and compehension of the pio theapy session (Beck, 1995). Being awae of the fact that they will be questioned concening the pevious session encouages the client to pepae fo the pesent session by eflecting on the session thoughout the week. If the client cannot emembe thei esponses o the significant concepts fom the pio theapeutic session, the counselo and client come togethe to figue out a way so that they can moe effectively ecall the elements of the pesent session. The Session Bidging Woksheet offes a way of getting this done. This is impotant because seveal studies have shown that inceased memoy and undestanding of theapeutic sessions has a diect impact on teatment outcome (Shephed, Salkovskis, & Mois, 2009). Also this technique equies that…… [Read More]

references. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 37(2), 141-150.

Whipple, J.L., Lambert, M.J., Vermeersch, D.A., Smart, D.W., Nielsen, S.L., & Hawkins, E.J. (2003). Improving the effects of psychotherapy: The use of early identification of treatment failure and problem solving strategies in routine practice. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58, 59-68.
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Cognitive Psychology Essay

Words: 2882 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Paper #: Array

This essay discusses cognitive psychology and a specific scenario within that scientific term. It starts out with an introduction or definition of cognitive psychology, then discusses a specific scenario, and perspectives of the scenario. The body of this essay covers treatments, therapies, and interventions for the scenario, as well as effectiveness of therapies, before summing up the paper with a conclusion.
Titles:
Cognitive Psychology: Modern Approach to Human Behavior

Cognitive Psychology Advancements
Topics:
Introduction to Applied Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive Psychology of Planning
Outline:
I. Introduction

II. Body
A. Scenario
B. Psychological Perspectives
C. Treatment, Therapies, Interventions
D. Effectiveness of Therapies
III. Conclusion
Title: Cognitive Psychology Scenario Essay

Introduction
Cognitive psychology is a relatively new or modern approach to human behavior whose main focus is how people think. This approach in psychology focuses on how people think because of the belief that thought processes affect peoples behaviors. In essence, an individuals…… [Read More]

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Cognitive Teaching to Nurses

Words: 1361 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57515574

Teaching & Learning the Cognitive, Affective, & Psychomotor Domains

Janice is a 28-year-old financial advisor. She is now 7 months pregnant with her first child. She is complaining of many symptoms including fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, leg cramps and mouth/tongue sores. She is diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Write learning objectives to guide your teaching about how diet modification could improve her health and well-being.

In nursing, patients who are pregnant represent a category that can be especially complex given the fact that there are a range of various implications due to the prenatal needs of the expecting mother. The fetus is especially vulnerable in the early stages of development and symptoms that the mother has could potentially cause a lifetime full of health issues if the symptoms are sufficiently problematic. esearch has even confirmed data that supports the efficacy of certain kinds of prenatal stimulation and the future child…… [Read More]

References

All, A., & Havens, R. (1997). Cognitive/concept mapping: a teaching strategy for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 1210-1219.

Burchum, J. (2002). Cultural Competence: An Evolutionary Perspective. Nursing Forum, 5-15.

Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services: A Model of Care. Journal of Transactional Nursing, 181-184.

Lafuente, M., & Grifol, R. (2001). Effects of the Firstart Method of Prenatal Stimulation on Psychomotor Development: From Six to Twelve Months. Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health, 207-216.
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Cognitive Affective Behavior

Words: 3545 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 46116628

Perception Theory

The issue of perception in various fields, including philosophy and psychology has been debated with vigor over the last fifty years. In fact, a large amount of experimental work has been completed regarding questions such as the object of perception, the relationship between perception and though, and the nature of perception representational.

In general it is believed that perception occurs without apparent effort. What is seen is imposed upon the brain and perception is the natural consequence. Theorists have however argued that this is not the case. There are a number of factors involved in the perception process. These factors influence the way that objects are perceived. It has for example been argued that perception is a process of information transmission and elaboration. The cognitivist paradigm holds that a flow of information in the mind, similar to computer software, influences the way that objects are perceived.

The lines…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davidoff, J.B. (1975). Differences in Visual Perception. London: Crosby Lockwood Staples.

Gibson, J.J. (1979). The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Hamlyn, D.W. (1957). The Psychology of Perception. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Kennedy, J.M. & C.D. Green (2003). "Inference and Pattern in Perception Theory." http://citd.scar.utoronto.ca/Psychology/PSYB51/INFERENC.B51.html
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CBT Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Case Study

Words: 5334 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41705783

Cognitive Behavior Therapy- A Case Study

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Case Study

Case report

K is a forty-eight-year female who referred to Midlothian's clinical psychology psychosis service. K has a twenty-year history of mental health conditions. She first decided to contact mental health services because of the episodes of paranoia and severe depression she had experienced. During her initial contact with the mental health services she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 1996. When she was first referred to the mental health services department she was a single. She told of having only two close relationships in her past life. She however also said that she found these relationships challenging when it came to intimate contact. She also generally described that she found it somewhat difficult to form friendships or to trust people in her life. Despite the mental health conditions her general physical well-being was good. K was prescribed…… [Read More]

References

Bladek, M. (2014). Against memory: Acts of remembering in Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. Retrieved from  http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/2007%20Fall%20Documents/Affect%20Abstracts/Abstracts.htm 

DeJong, P. & . Berg I.K (1998): Interviewing for solutions. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Drisko, J. (2014). Research Evidence and Social Work Practice: The Place of Evidence-Based Practice. Clin Soc Work J. 42:123-133 DOI 10.1007/s10615-013-0459-9

Freud, S. (1924) A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Boni & Liveright.
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Economics My Main Cognitive Shortfall

Words: 775 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82411503



When reading memoirs of terrorists for instance, I have often found that many terrorists fervently believe in what they are doing and think it beneficial for their soul. hey have been brought up in a culture -- such as in Korea, or in the former Soviet Russia, and consider themselves the truly knowing person, and the other who has been duped.

his reminds me too of memoirs that I have read of people suffering from bipolar or who have been declared insane. Oftentimes, these patients, particularly the latter consider themselves 'normal' and surrounding people to be abnormal. he question then is one that hinges on the definition of abnormality. A person in one society may be considered 'normal'; in another society this 'well-functioning', 'normal' person may be rated an outcast and considered 'aborning'. he problem it seems to me comes about when the person is following customs and norms that…… [Read More]

This is where I see my-confirmation as being the most major -- since it is the most significant -fallacy.

Source

Flanagan, C. (2012) Girl land. Brown & Co. USA
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Henderson a Cognitive Behavioral Study of Steven

Words: 3439 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12843400

Henderson

A Cognitive Behavioral Study of Steven Henderson: Case Conceptualization and Treatment Plan

Theories of Counseling

Coun510_D04

This is a case conceptualization of a 26-year-old man who experienced sexual abuse as a child and the haunting memories of the abuse have led to difficulties in his personal, social, and educational functioning as an adult. The client is experiencing anxiety, depression, problems with motivation, an inability to confide in those close to him, and difficulties in developing educational and occupational goals for himself. He complained of very low self-esteem and believes that his inability to deal with his past sexual abuse has led to these issues. The case conceptualization explores the proposed treatment of this individual's issues using a cognitive behavioral approach. Empirical evidence for the use of cognitive behavioral treatment for trauma victims is discussed. The specific issues that the individual is experiencing as a result of the abuse are…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.-text revision). Washington, DC: Author.

Beck, A.T., Rush, J.A., Shaw, B.F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression.

New York: The Guilford Press.

Cloitre, M. (2009). Effective psychotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder: A review and critique. CNS Spectrums, 14(1), S1, 32-43.
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Learning Cognitive Theory of Learning

Words: 5035 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10711915

When children are given the option between a reward they would like and the internal desire to learn something, most children would rather have the reward. That is also true of many adults, whether they are in an educational setting or a business setting. Still, that does not mean that intrinsic interest cannot come along with extrinsic reward, or that operant theory is completely wrong. Many educators mix operant theory with cognitive theory in an effort to provide those with different learning styles more of an opportunity to learn and develop. This helps to reach the largest number of students per educator, improving the overall educational goal.

ognitive Theory of Learning

Introduction

The cognitive theory of learning has been part of education since the late 1920's, when a Gestalt psychologist focused on the issue of Gestalt teaching and learning, and what that could offer to students who were not learning…… [Read More]

Carton, J.S. (1996). The differential effects of tangible rewards and praise on intrinsic motivation: A comparison of cognitive evaluation theory and operant theory. The Behavior Analyst, 19, 237-255.

Cavalier, a.R., Ferretti, R.P., & Hodges, a.E. (1997). Self-management within a classroom token economy for students with learning disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 18, 167-178.

Davidson, P., & Bucher, B. (1978). Intrinsic interest and extrinsic reward: The effects of a continuing token program on continuing nonconstrained preference. Behavior Therapy, 9, 222-234.
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Chess and Cognitive Ability Revision Does Chess

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 79917628

Chess and Cognitive Ability Revision

Does Chess Enhance Cognitive Ability?

PSYC 317, Fall 2012

Psychologists and cognitive researchers have long suspected a link between the ability to play chess proficiently and superior intelligence levels. By conducting a thorough review of the prevailing research concerning chess and the enhancement of cognitive abilities, as well as studies which fail to establish conclusive links between the two, it is possible to form a more fully informed conclusion. Research studies focused on deductive reasoning, mathematics, and logical analysis and their use in the game of chess will be compared and examined for error or bias, in an effort to synthesize the findings of several researchers over a period of decades into a coherent conclusion.

Does Chess Enhance Cognitive Ability

Chess is a complex game of strategy, the best practitioners of which excel at deductive reasoning, visualization and memorization of concrete events that transpire on…… [Read More]

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Bipolar Student in Math and Science Class

Words: 2846 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 22507836

ability of a bipolar student to learn concepts in the subjects of Math and Science in the general classroom setting

According to sources retrieved from the American Medical Journal, bipolar disorder refers to the psychiatric diagnosis for a mood disorder. Individuals who suffer from bipolar disorder undergo various symptoms such as experiencing episodes of a frenzied state whose medical term is mania (or hypomania). This medical condition typically alternates with episodes of depression. Doctor Annabel Hathaway, a senior psychologist at the University of Stanford, children suffering from bipolar disorders have high intelligence quotient and commendable talents. However, they may have difficulties in coordinating their reflexes and reaction time. They also experience difficulties making transitions, and they may as well have co-morbid syndromes that that render them anxious, inattentive, distractible, moody, argumentative, and withdrawn. Likewise, bipolar disorders may render such children acute and perfectionist.

Psychologists explain that children with bipolar disorders…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglada, Tracy The Student with Bipolar Disorder: An Educator's Guide BP Children Organization < http://www.bpchildren.org/files/Download/Educator.pdf>

Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation Educating the Child with Bipolar Disorder State: Arizona Department of Education

Grier, Elizabeth Chesno, Wilkins, Megan L. And Carolyn Ann Stirling Pender Bipolar Disorder: Educational Implications for Secondary Students Michigan: University of Michigan Press

The Balanced Mind Foundation An Educator's Guide to Pediatric Bipolar Disorder <  http://www.thebalancedmind.org/learn/library/an-educators-guide-to-pediatric-bipolar-disorder >
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Management and Decision Sciences From

Words: 25680 Length: 90 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 55501983

76). As automation increasingly assumes the more mundane and routine aspects of work of all types, Drucker was visionary in his assessment of how decisions would be made in the years to come. "In the future," said Drucker, "it was possible that all employment would be managerial in nature, and we would then have progressed from a society of labor to a society of management" (Witzel, p. 76). The first tasks of the manager, then, are to coordinate an organization's resources and provide a viable framework in which they can be used to produce goods and services effectively and efficiently. The second set of tasks concern guidance and control. In Drucker's view, this role is almost entirely proactive: "Economic forces set limits to what a manager can do. They create opportunities for management's action. But they do not by themselves dictate what a business is or what it does" (Drucker,…… [Read More]

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Humor Stress Cognitive Appraisals There

Words: 1416 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 842045

The higher the humor score, the more the individual was able to place positive distance between their actions and tangible outcomes; they did not interpret their performance on the exams to be as indicative of their own personal worth as much.

Theoretical Support - The key to the brain mind connection can be found in a complex set of molecules called neuropeptides. Petptides are made up of amino acids, the very basic building blocks of protein strucutres. There are, in fact, 23 different amino acids, and peptides are amino acids strung together very much like a string of beads on a necklace. Peptides are found in most areas of the body, but especially the brain and immunie system. Neurally, there are a number of different peptides, including endorphins. Neuropeptides are the way that cellular communication occurs, including brain-to-brain messages, brain-to-body messages, body-to-body messages, and body-to-brain messages. Individual cells have receptro…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Kupier, N., Martin, R. (1993). Coping Humour, Stress and Cognitive Appraisals. Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science. 251 (1): 81-96.
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Language Cognitive Psychology Language Is

Words: 1095 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27483814

It includes morphology and syntax, often complemented by phonetics, phonology, semantics, and pragmatics (Grammar, n.d.).

Pragmatics is the study of the ability of natural language speakers to communicate more than that which is explicitly stated; it is the ability to understand another speaker's intended meaning is called pragmatic competence; and an utterance describing pragmatic function is described as metapragmatic (Pragmatics, n.d.).

The ole of Language Processing in Cognitive Psychology

Jean Piaget, the founder of cognitive development, was involved in a debate about the relationships between innate and acquired features of language, at the Centre oyaumont pour une Science de l'Homme, where he had a discussion about his opinion with the linguist Noam Chomsky as well as Hilary Putnam and Stephen Toulmin (McKinney, & Parker, 1999). Piaget discussed that his cognitive constructivism has two main parts: an "ages and stages" component which foretells what children can and cannot understand at different…… [Read More]

References

Language. (n.d). Retrieved March 13, 2009, from Wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language .

Lexicon (2001). Retrieved March 13, 2009, from Online Etymology Dictionary:

 http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=lexicon 

Lexicon. (n.d). Retrieved March 13, 2009, from Wikipedia:
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Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Words: 2290 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71659198

Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

Psychodynamic and Cognitive Behavioral Theories

In this paper, there is going to an examination of Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic theories. This is accomplished by focusing on: the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these ideas. These elements will show how each one can address issues impacting the patient and the long-term effects upon them.

In the world of psychology, there are different theories which are used to explain how someone reacts to various stimuli. The result is that there has been contrasting ideas about the best way to understand human behavior. Two schools of thought which are very popular are the psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches. (Okun, 2008)

To fully understand them requires examining each one. This will be accomplished by focusing on the two theories, their theoretical concepts, micro skills / techniques and a summary of these…… [Read More]

References

Larson, P. (2012). How Important is an Understanding of the Clients Early Attachments. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (1), 10 -- 18.

Lucia, M. (2012). Therapeutic Activities and Psychological Interventions. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 12 (2), 118 -- 127.

Okun, B. (2008). Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques. New York, NY: Brooks and Cole.

Parpottis, P. (2012). Working with the Therapeutic Relationship. Counseling Psychology Review, 27 (3), 91-97
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Why Humanism and Social Cognitive Perspectives Are Key Psychological Theories

Words: 1008 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52044826

Humanistic vs. Social-Cognitive Perspectives

This paper compares and contrasts the main themes of the social-cognitive perspective with the themes of the humanistic perspective. Both perspectives are reviewed and presented and the differences are made clear as well. The limitations of each perspective will also be presented.

The Humanistic Perspective

The authors of Humanistic Perspectives on Contemporary Counseling Issues (a book with no page numbers) explain that humanistic approaches to mental health used to dominate the profession of counseling -- and that humanism should not be "placed on a shelf in the intellectual museum of the profession" nor should it be seen as a "bygone trend" (Scholl, et al., 2013). And rather than putting humanism on the list of perspectives that have been "eclipsed" by newer trends in the field of psychology, the authors believe that humanism is "not just a theory or treatment orientation, but also a 'moral imperative'" (Scholl).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Heiphetz, L., and Young, L. (2014). A social cognitive developmental perspective on moral judgment. Behavior, Vol. 151, 315-335.

Luszczynska, A., and Schwarzer, R. (2005). "Social Cognitive Theory" in Predicting Health

Behavior: Research and Practice with Social Cognition Models. Editors Conner, M., and Norman, P. New York: McGraw-Hill.

National Institutes of Health. 2010). Consumer Health Informatics Research Resource -- Self
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Memory and Learning and Cognitive Psychology

Words: 2891 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 79054100

Learning and Cognitive Psychology Related to Memory

Memory has control over everything that an individual does and is a part of cognitive psychology that deals with all the human behavior and mental processes. It is divided into different categories with each of them performing their particular functions. The paper investigates the different types of memories and their purpose as each one plays its part in keeping the memory part of the brain functioning. The nature, maintenance, retrieval and capacity of memory are also discussed along with the different factors that influence it. The paper also discusses the application of TRS model on the working memory, which leads to the prediction that maintenance activities should postpone concurrent processing.

Introduction

Memory is what drives our everyday life, makes us relate to or recollect things from the past and in many ways defines our behavior. We take it for granted as the effort…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baddeley, A.D., Thomson, N., & Buchanan, M. (1975).World length and the structure of short-term memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 14, 575-589.

Blankenship, A.B. (1938). Memory span: A review of the literature. Psychological Bulletin, 35, 1-25.

Brener, R. (1940). An experimental investigation of memory span. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 26, 467-482

Bousfield, W.A. (1953). The occurrence of clustering in the recall of randomly arranged associates. Journal of General Psychology, 49, 229 -- 240. doi:10.1080/00221309.1953.9710088
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Male Child Cognitive Development the

Words: 1785 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 2547449

" (Anderson, et al., 2003) The study reported by Roberts, Christenson and Gentile (2003) provided a summary of a study that is unpublished but that states findings of a "positive correlation between amount of MTV watching and physical fights among third- through fifth-grade children. In addition, children who watched a lot of MTV were rated by peers as more verbally aggressive, more relationally aggressive, and more physically aggressive than other children. Teachers rated them as more relationally aggressive, more physically aggressive, and less helpful." (Anderson, et al., 2003) Anderson et al. also reports the study of Rubin, West, and Mitchell (2001) who state findings that young people listening to heavy metal music "held more negative attitudes toward women." (Anderson et al., 2003)

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

The male child is more likely to view violence against females as well as sexual aggression against females to be acceptable if the male child…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gentile, D.A. And Sesma, A. (2003) Developmental Approaches to Understanding Media Effects on Individuals. Online available at  http://www.psychology.iastate.edu/~dgentile/106027_02.pdf 

Nevins, Tara (2004) The Effects of Media Violence on Adolescent Health. Physicians for Global Survival, Canada, Summer 2004. Online available at http://pgs.wemanageyour.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/effectsofmediaviolence_final.pdf

Anderson, C. et al. (2003) The Influence of Media Violence on Youth. Psychological Science in the Public Interest. VOL. 4, NO. 3, December 2003. Online available at  http://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/pspi/pspi43.pdf
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Decision Sciences

Words: 1403 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15077045

Decision Sciences

Decision-making is an important activity for top management in any enterprise. Strategic thinking is required for making useful decisions. For example, business executives plan strategies to access market share, to deal with employees, to react to competition and to decide on career growth. Decision Sciences is a discipline on its own that provides techniques and methods to take decisions in any practical situations. In this paper, a list of journals and websites that provides information on Decision Sciences is provided. This list is expected to be useful to top management. (America's Investment in the Future: Decision Sciences-How the Game Is being played)

Decision Sciences" is a quarterly, professional journal published by Decision Sciences Institute. This journal utilizes the current methods of mathematics and statistics along with computer technology and behavior science. This journal is read by business professionals and teaching professionals. From 2003, Blackwell Publishing is publishing this…… [Read More]

References

America's Investment in the Future: Decision Sciences-How the Game Is being played" Retrieved at  http://www.nsf.gov/about/history/nsf0050/decision/decisionsx2.htm . Accessed on 21 February 2005

Asia Pacific Decision Sciences Institute: Theme - Collaborative Decision Making in the Internet Era" retrieved at  http://www.calpoly.edu/~eli/apdsi/apdsi2005/ . Accessed on 22 February 2005

Decision Analysis Society" Retrieved at  http://faculty.fuqua.duke.edu/daweb/ . Accessed on 22 February 2005

Decision Line" (October 2004) Volume 35(5) retrieved at  http://www.decisionsciences.org/DecisionLine/Vol35/35_5/index.htm . Accessed on 21 February 2005
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Art and Science One in

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51928153

The process whereby the truth of a certain matter or problem is investigated is in and of itself an art form. Though the manner in which certain problems are investigated are very similar, they are also very different depending on the person conducting the experiment. Each scientists works in a unique manner as does each artists working to uncover beauty. Thus one may suggest that the quest for uncovering truth is much like the quest for discovering beauty. In fact, one may simply define beauty as the pursuit or discovery of the certain truth about something or someone.

As alike as these two concepts may be they are also irreconcilably different. In the process of finding the truth one must seek out concrete realities. Typically these realities have to be something that can be proved or disproved, based on reasoning and logic rather than subjective experience. Science often involves experimentation…… [Read More]

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Relationship Between Hours of Sleep and Both of Satisfaction With Life and Cognitive Functioning

Words: 1129 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 61908318

Hours of Sleep, Life Satisfaction & Cognitive Functioning

Cognitive Functioning

ELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOUS OF SLEEP, SATISFACTION WITH LIFE AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING

elationship between Hours of Sleep and Both of Satisfaction with Life and Cognitive Functioning

Proper sleeping hours are very important for our body's functioning. When a person is sleeping, his body is in the process of repair; thus allowing his brain to have some rest and the needed down time. There are many negative effects of less sleeping hours on the cognitive function as well as life satisfaction of a person.

Just like a proper diet, sleep plays a very essential role in the maintenance of overall health of an individual. Unfortunately, Americans are facing some serious cognitive and life satisfaction problems due to lack of sleeping hours. According to an estimate from U.S. Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), approximately 25% of U.S. citizens have less sleeping…… [Read More]

References

National Sleep Foundation, 2005. Summary of Findings, retrieved on June 17, 2011 from www.sleepfoundation.org

Siri Carpenter, 2001. Sleep Deprivation May Be Undermining Teen Health. Monitor Staff, Vol 32, No. 9, pp.42.

Julia A. Shekleton, Naomi L. Rogers and Shantha M.W. Rajaratnam, 2009. Searching For The Daytime Impairments Of Primary Insomnia. Clinical Review, Brain & Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales

William E. Kelly, 2010. Sleep-Length And Life Satisfaction In A College Student Sample. Retrieved on June 17, 2011 from  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCR/is_3_38/ai_n6249228/
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Music and Cognitive Theory

Words: 1223 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55816649

Music and Cognitive Theory

Music tends to have a phenomenal power over the human mind and emotions. A movie without a soundtrack would seem so dull and boring. If you try closing your eyes and picture a scene with music, it gives a completely different mood and emotion to it. Even before the music culture that exists today, human beings were still making some kind of music. They made flutes with the bones and jaw harps. Music has always had an innate appreciation for humans. Pleasant sounds lure a person to identify its source, whereas a shrill, unpleasant sound makes a person uncomfortable.

Studies show that while an orchestral concert, the pleasure centers of a human brain are activated. These are also active while a person has chocolate, engages in sexual acts or during the intake of stimulants like hash and cocaine. hen a baby is being formed inside a…… [Read More]

Work cited:

Mursell, J. (1970). The Psychology of Music. New York: Prentice Hall.

Schlaug, G.L. Jancke, Y. Huang, and H. Steinmetz. 1995. In vivo evidence of structural brain asymmetry in musicians. Science 267: 699-701.

Ratey, J. (2002). A Users Guide to the Brain. New York: Vintage.

Strickland, S. (2001). Music and the Brain in Childhood Development. Childhood Education, 78(2), 98-109.
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Falsifiability in Psychological Science for

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48012793



However, psychology, even scientific psychology, presents falsifiability challenges not evident in the natural scientists. Some scientists might argue that Freud has been shown to be a poor theorist, given what has been revealed about the brain since Popper's day. If a depressive shows no improvement after years of Freudian therapy, but does show improvement after taking Prozac, that could be said to prove Freud wrong. Unfortunately, so many other external factors can affect a person's mood it is hard to attribute a single cause to a person's remission. It could be the drug or other conditions in the individual's environment. While large drug trials try to use large sample sizes as a way of reducing the influence of extraneous variables as well as use control groups who receive a placebo, the less observable and testable the phenomenon, the more difficult it is to measure. Even attempts to demonstrate improvement of…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, Patricia. (2007). Freud is widely taught at universities, except in the psychology department. The New York Times. Retrieved April 3, 2010 at  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/25/weekinreview/25cohen.htm 

Good and bad theories. (2007, April 27). On Philosophy. Retrieved April 2, 2010 at  http://onphilosophy.wordpress.com/2007/04/27/good-and-bad-theories/ 

Lutus, Paul. (2009, May 12). Is psychology a science? Retrieved April 2, 2010 at  http://www.arachnoid.com/psychology/ 

Marian, Lucian. (2008). Falsifiability. Debunking primal therapy. Retrieved April 2, 2010 at http://debunkingprimaltherapy.com/3_falsifiability-testable/
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Statistics for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

Words: 3816 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97885517

eduction of Prejudice

The Contact Hypothesis of Gordon Allport and the eduction of Prejudice

The literature covering the nature of prejudice, its scope, the effects of prejudice, and methods to reduce on prejudice is among the most extraordinary body of literature in all of social science. The total volume of research on the topic of prejudice is quite extraordinary and this body of work reflects several decades of scholarly investigation of the meaning of prejudice, its assessment, its etiology, its consequences, and methods to reduce prejudice. There are very few areas of study that have attracted a greater range of theoretical perspectives than the area of prejudice. Theorizing about the nature and manifestation of prejudice has also been accompanied by many spirited debates about the appropriate way to conceptualize methods to reduce prejudice in people. The result has been a rich body of measurement instruments and reduction strategies. The most…… [Read More]

References

Allport, G. (1954). The Nature of Prejudice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Aron, A., Aron, E. & Coups, E. (2011). Statistics for the behavioral and social sciences: A brief course. (5th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice-Hall.

Bar-Haim, Y., Ziv, T., Lamy, D., & Hodes, R.M. (2006). Nature and nurture in own-race face processing. Psychological Science, 17 (2), 159-163.

Binder, J., Zagefka, H., Brown, R., Funke, F., Kessler, T., Mummendey, A., Maquil, A., Demoulin, S. & Leyens, J. (2009). Does contact reduce prejudice or does prejudice reduce contact? A longitudinal test of the contact hypothesis among majority and minority groups in three European countries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96(4), 843-856.
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Allbusiness com Science-technology Behavior-cognition-psychology 13413337-1 html This Website Offers a

Words: 862 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Web Content Paper #: 6901904

The next step is to derive the process or processes that can be used to connect attributes of the current culture to attributes of the ideal/desired culture.

Another important point made on this site is that organizational change is behavioral change. While it is important to shift values and goals, these shifts are not meaningful in the absence of behavioral shifts.

However, knowing what the desired organizational culture looks like is not enough. Organizations must create plans to ensure that the desired organizational culture becomes a reality.

4. http://www.accilifeskills.com/cognitiverestructuring.php

This website provides a general definition of "cognitive restructuring." This definition underscores both the advantages and weaknesses of this model. A primary strength is that it is a simple, straightforward model. Parsimony is indeed a virtue: Simple models (all else being equal) tend to be stronger and more viable.

Simple models also have significant problems much of the time, and this…… [Read More]

5.  http://www.entarga.com/orgchange/lewinschein.pdf 

This website examines some of the key aspects of the concept of what researchers have called "survival anxiety." We are generally taught that anxiety is a bad thing. There is a great deal of energy devoted on both individual and cultural level on how to reduce anxiety. This makes sense to some extent: Too much anxiety can be psychologically paralyzing as well as physically harmful.

However, it is also true that all change of any significance will produce anxiety. And it is also true that change is needed. Therefore, part of what is required on both the individual and organizational levels is a way to assess what change is needed and beneficial -- and then to institute ways in which to work through the necessarily accompanying anxiety. The author presents a model in which an individual (although this could also work on the organizational level) first "unfreezes" old patterns (thus reducing anxiety), then institutes change. Finally, the individual "refreezes" the newly instituted changes in place.
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Psychology-Cognitive Attention in Order for

Words: 357 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95598863

So there has to be some sort of regulatory mechanism whereby we allow information to enter the information-processing system. The fact that we allow information to pass through implies that we have some choice about it, and indeed we do. In other words, attention is strategic (obinson-iegler and obinson-iegler, 2008).

Organized memory structures are called schemas. These are organized bodies of knowledge or set of movements that guide motor activities. Each schema is assumed to cover only a limited range of knowledge. Therefore, a given action sequence must be made up of a number of hierarchically organized schemas. The highest-level schema is called the parent schema and consists of a series of child schemas that are initiated by the parent schema at the appropriate time. Schemas play a huge role in helping us to organize information so that it can be remembered later on (obinson-iegler and obinson-iegler, 2008).

eferences

obinson-iegler,…… [Read More]

References

Robinson-Riegler, Gregory and Robinson-Riegler, Bridget. (2008). Cognitive Psychology:

Applying the Science of the Mind (2nd ed.). New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.
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Mega Technology Advanced Science and

Words: 594 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66684868

If any question receives a yes response then a PowerPoint presentation is on the "con" group:

Do the slides have more than 15 words per slide and are all slides in bullet point form?

Are the slides emotionally empty and without a presenter personality?

Do the slides encourage a deeper understanding of the topic?

Are the slides not memorable?

Do the slides distort the data and material being presented?

Do the slides encourage cognitive weakness (Tufte, 2003)?

An answer of yes to any of the above stated questions then a PowerPoint presentation is not an instructional tool that has much merit. In the end most PowerPoint presentations lack flexibility, oftentimes put an audience to sleep, are presented too fast and contain no persistence of information - not to mention possible power failures that completely destroy a presentation, lecture, or seminar.

Not all PowerPoint presentations are as obtuse and debilitating as…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, Cliff (2003). Beyond bullet points: Using Microsoft PowerPoint to create presentations that inform, motivate, and inspire. Columbus, Ohio: Microsoft Press McGraw-Hill Books.

Tufte, Edward R. (2003). The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint. Graphics Press: Cheshire, CT.
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Stress on Human Memory and Cognitive Capabilities

Words: 880 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 52861867

Stress on Human Memory and Cognitive Capabilities

Types of Stresses on Short-Term Memory

Symptoms of Short-Term Memory

Stress weakens a human's ability to be able to pass proper chemicals through the blood-brain barrier. The blood-brain barrier is an assemblage of blood vessels that defends the brain from toxins that circulate through one's body (Franklin Institute, 2004).

Evidence of stress on the short-term memory includes difficulty to learn new things, dizziness, headaches, and nausea (Franklin Institute, 2004).

Effects of Stress on Short-Term Memory

When stress takes place in the human body, hormones are released that divert blood glucose from the brain's hippocampus (Franklin Institute, 2004).

The lack of energy that is provided by the lost glucose creates the hippocampus to become concerned about the lack of energy. This fright causes an inability to create accurate new memories (Franklin Institute, 2004).

This can be a result o a onetime traumatic event in…… [Read More]

References

Bower, B. (2005). Early stress in rats bites memory later on. Science News, 186(17), Retrieved

from  http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=11&did=918673191&SrchMode=1&sid=4&Fmt  =3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1294957038&clientI d=77774

Franklin Institute. (2004). The human brain-stress. Retrieved January 13,2011 from  http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/stress.html 

HelpGuide.org. (2010). Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Symptoms, treatment, and self- help. Retrieved January 13, 2011 from  http://helpguide.org/mental/post_traumatic_stress_disorder_symptoms_treatment.htm
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Psychology Imagery Mental Imagery Is a Cognitive

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70139907

Psychology

Imagery

Mental Imagery is a cognitive process that very much resembles the human experience of perceiving an object, scene, or event when that object, scene or event is not present. Some educators think that the use of mental imagery can both enhance memorization and learning. If the learning process can emphasize visual, auditory and kinesthetic experiences, then teaching in multiple sensory processes benefits the potential for memory. Being able to mentally "see" the event, page, process, formula, musical notes, etc. often creates a more robust memory experience for the learner (Kosslyn, et.al, 2003).

The loci technique, or the memory palace, is a mnemonic device that allows for images or facts to be associated with physical locations. Cognitively, it relies on an individual's ability to memorize spatial relationships that give order, and then that order helps with recollection. The idea is that we can increase our chances of memorizing something…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Peg Method for Remembering Lists. (2011). Retrieved from:  http://www.memory-improvement-tips.com/remembering-lists.html 

Strategies of Divergent Thinking. (2008). University of Washington. Retrieved from:  http://faculty.washington.edu/ezent/imdt.htm 

Carlson, N. (2010) Psychology: The Science of Behavior. Toronto: Pearson Canada.

Fliskowski, P. (2011). Understanding Sentences: Does the Garden Path Theory Sufficiently Explain How Humans Comprehend? Seminar Paper. Retrieved from: http://books. google.com/books?id=FKXdYsU49tQC&printsec=frontcover&dq=garden+path+sentences&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZHWkUNm6JIb8igKnq4DoBw&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAg
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Seeking the Ramifications in Cognitive Theory

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93811635

Criminology

Application of Schools of Criminal Thought

Within the classical school of thought (rational choice framework from economics), the charges against the perpetrator would be considered both logical and effective. Under classical thought, criminology holds that punishment is an effective deterrent to crime, and that punishment should be rationally aligned with the severity of the crime. The positivist school of thought (functionalist or biological, psychological, and sociological framework) would consider the crime and the punishment against a background of social and genetic influence. Within positivist criminology, the offender is viewed as having a flawed personality and character, brought about by significant deprivations during impressionable years, and that may at least be ameliorated through integrated therapies and treatment. The neo-classical school of thought (empiricism framework) considers crime -- and makes and implements policy -- through a rationalist, scientific, and evidence-based lens.

Theoretical Criminology Frameworks

Social bonding theory. Social bonding theory stems…… [Read More]

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Social Science Research Silver Roxane

Words: 429 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 74008829

For this kind of research to be effective, researchers must gain the trust and confidence of these individuals. Careful planning, focus group research, and investigation may help to build this kind of trust, but all of those steps add time (and expenses) to the research process.

c) Use of untested assumptions. Researchers may have their own assumptions about how people react to trauma, and these assumptions may negatively affect their own neutrality. Those assumptions may also impact the design of the study, through the types of questions being asked in the research to the way the researcher interacts with the subjects. Misconceptions about trauma are rampant, and in fact people react very differently to stresses in their lives.

5.

Major Findings: Researchers discovered a great deal of variability in post-traumatic response among individuals in the immediate community where the trauma took place. Many of those closest to the trauma had…… [Read More]

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Magic Johnson and HIV Science Knows That

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88093176

Magic Johnson and HIV

Science knows that although HIV can transition into AIDS, it does not automatically become AIDS. Magic Johnson, new president of the Los Angeles Dodgers and a member of the NBA Hall of Fame, was diagnosed with HIV several years ago. One of the immediate responses from Magic Johnson's body (with HIV) was the weakening of his immune system, which made him -- and makes all HIV-positive patients -- susceptible to the following infections and cancers:

Tuberculosis: an infectious disease "caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis" (Medical News Today).

Salmonellosis Enterocolitis: a very common kind of food poisoning that causes severe dehydration (NCBI)

Cytomegalovirus (CMV): this is a virus infection from a "member of the herpesvirus family" (Medline Plus).

Candidiasis: an infection of the mouth and tongue (Mayo Clinic).

Cryptococcal meningitis: this is an inflammation of those membranes and the fluid that is found around the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aidsinfonet.org. Fact Sheet 801: "Vitamins and Minerals." Retrieved June 23, 2012, from http://www.aidsinfonet.org/fact_sheets/view.801. 2012.

Cancer.org. "Kaposi Sarcoma: What is Kaposi Sarcoma?" Retrieved June 23, 2012, from  http://www.cancer.org . 2009.

Mayo Clinic. "HIV / AIDS" Retrieved June 23, 2012, from  http://www.mayoclinic.com . 2011.

Medical News Today. "What is Tuberculosis? What Causes Tuberculosis?" Retrieved June 24,
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Social Psychology The Social Sciences

Words: 1691 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 27191752

Thus, this aspect can multiply into many sub-genres that focus on one or more aspects of the social world as they contribute to influencing behaviors and innate thought processes. Focusing on the social means looking for more abstract concepts that relate to existence within a social world. Actually trying to predict later success in publication, "Predicting the future success of junior scholars is of great concern to academic hiring committees," (Haslam & Lamb 2009:144). Yet it is based within two correlating variables that can then be compared, "It is therefore reasonable to predict that publication success during graduate school may be associated with publication success later in people's academic careers," (Haslam & Lamb 2009:144). Although the subject is socially constructed, the method of analysis is still quantitatively measured. Even this study shows quantitative measurement use- using mathematical prediction models in analysis of data (Haslam & Lamb 2009). egression analysis, common…… [Read More]

References

Haslam, Nick & Laham, Simon M. (2009). Ten years on: does graduate student promise predict later scientific achievement? Current Research in Social Psychology. 14(10):143-147.

Kearl, Michael C. (2009). Social psychology. Trinity University. Retrieved 28, October 2009 at  http://trinity.edu/~mkearl/socpsy.html 

New York University (2009). Infants able to identify humans as source of speech. Science Daily. Retrieved October 28, 2009 at  http://www.sciencedaily.com /releases/2009/10/091019162919.htm" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Math Science and Social Study Lesson Plans

Words: 1938 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89739773

Integrated Curriculum Analysis

A teacher's main objective usually centers in arousing the curiosity of the student enough to engage them in the process of learning. Engagement can often lead to enthusiasm, and enthusiasm leads to learning. One of the most effective methods of engagement is through the use of real-world tasks. Francom & Gardner (2014) determined that many of the recent models of learning provided instruction center learning that incorporated real-world tasks and problems that support the transfer and application of knowledge. The writer Howard Hendricks said "What is important is not what you do as a teacher, but what your students learn as a result of what you do." Students in today's educational environment follow the teacher's lead but collaborate much more with other students than in previous generations. A teacher must understand that collaboration and use it as well as the available technology to ensure that the students…… [Read More]

References

Francom, G. & Gardner, J.; (2014) What is task-centered learning? TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice Learning, 58(5) p. 27-35

Howard Hendricks Quotes." Quotes.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 26 Oct. 2014. Retrieved from  http://www.quotes.net/authors/Howard%20Hendricks 

Hutchison, A., & Reinking, D. (2011) Teachers' perceptions of integrating information and communication technologies into literacy instruction: A national survey in the U.S. Reading Research Quarterly, 46(4), 308 -- 329.

Nielsen, C.; DeFranco, J.F. & Malm, E.; (2015) Math, science and sustainability-enhanced career and technical education, Techniques: Connecting Education & Careers, 90(3) pp. 50-55
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Workplace Are Job Knowledge Tests Cognitive Ability

Words: 1575 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84569419

workplace are job knowledge tests, cognitive ability tests, and personality tests.

Job Knowledge Tests

Achievement tests or job knowledge tests are composed of questions designed to measure technical or professional expertise in a specific area of knowledge. Therefore job knowledge tests assess the knowledge of the test taker at the point in time of the assessment. Job knowledge tests are most often utilized in conditions that require applicants to possess a specific set or type of information prior to being hired (Dye, eck, & McDaniel, 1993). Job knowledge tests are useful for positions that require some type of specialized skill or technical knowledge. Typically this type of skill or knowledge has been acquired over a long period. Given this, job knowledge tests are not appropriate to use when the applicants will are going to be trained in the areas tested following their selection. The most common format of job knowledge…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2011). Rights and responsibilities of test takers:

guidelines and expectations. In, American Psychological Association (APA). Retrieved November, 29, 2011, from http://www.apa.org/science/programs/testing/rights.aspx

Anastasi, A. (1967). Psychology, psychologists, and psychological testing. American Psychologist, 22(4), 297-306.

Anastasi, A. & Urbina, S. (1997). Psychological testing (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River:
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the'stages of childhood development physical cognitive

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68291667

Piaget’s Stages of Development
Few theorists have had as strong an impact on developmental psychology as Jean Piaget. While the theories of Lev Vygotsky have offered compelling counterpoints to Piaget’s theories, the stages of psychosocial development Piaget proposed remain salient. In fact, it is easy to combine emerging research on childhood development from infancy to adolescence in terms of Piaget’s stages. As Lightfoot, Cole & Cole (2009) point out, evolutionary theories, information processing theories, and systems theories can all be integrated within the staged concept of development that Piaget proposed. Piaget shows how children develop physically, socially, and cognitively. Likewise, theories of childhood development can demonstrate how children develop self-awareness, empathy, and complex use of language. The four main stages of development include the sensorimotor, the preoperational, the concrete operational, and the formal operational. While far from being discreet stages with strong demarcations between them, empirical research in cognitive, behavioral,…… [Read More]

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Ayurveda and Western Science Compare

Words: 1946 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27267966

The largest difference exists in the basis of the Western holistic treatment and the basis of Ayurveda. Western holistic treatments are based on TCM or 'Traditional Chinese Medicine'. The key components of TCM are as follows:

Qi (pronounced like "chee") - this is the vital energy necessary for life (blood, body fluid)

Zang-Fu - the internal organs; and Jing-Luo: - this governs the meridian and collateral systems of the body. (rown, 2001)

Practitioners of TCM also used a system referred to as "The Eight Principles" which are used to categorize illness or disease. These eight principles are comprised of "four pairs of polarities, including:

interior/exterior;

hot/cold;

deficiency/excess; and Yin/Yang." (rown, 2001)

These principles are stated to determine:

1) Disease location;

2) the nature of imbalance;

3) the presence of a pathological (disease) factors; and 4) the strength of the body's own energies. (rown, 2001)

Summary and Conclusion

Ayurvedic medicine is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brown, Liz (2001) East Meets West and Western Medicine Takes a Back Seat: Why Ayurvedic and Chinese Medicines are at the Core of All That's Right with Holistic Healing Today. Better Nutrition Journal. December 2001. Online available at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FKA/is_12_63/ai_83076770/print .

Cooper, Edwin L. (2004) 12th International Congress of Oriental Medicine. Oriental Medicine and Biotechnology in the Post-Genomic Era - WHO's Traditional Medicine Strategy 2002 Date: November 6-9, 2003. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Journal. 2004 1(1):103-106 Oxford University Press.

Healing Choices (2007) Guide to Complementary and Alternative Healthcare. Online available at  http://www.healingchoicesonline.com/ .

Herlihy, John a. (2003) the Mystery and the Miracle Ayurveda. 13 April 2003. AuthorsDen.com. Online available at  http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewShortStory.asp?AuthorID=1363&id=7866 .
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Ethnomethodology the Social Science of

Words: 2885 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91891783

He wanted to show how conversation analysis and ethnomethodology may elucidate two interrelated matters of continuing concern to the ethnographer: the role of culture in shaping an informants' behavior and the apparent capacity of an investigated culture to compel the fieldworker to follow local habits of thought.

For this research, Watson defined ethnomethodology as "the study of how people, in their everyday lives, constitute the world as a recognizable state of affairs." Similar to conversation analysis, it is concerned with explication of order in social interaction and attempts to replace the existing Parsonian motivational approach to the analysis of social action to one with procedure. It asks not why but how. stipulates four basic moves in conversation analysis of ethnomethodology: 1) Conversation analysis and ethnomethodology look at utterances as tools for the performance of activities, not just things that stand in for other things. Further, activities performed by utterances are…… [Read More]

References

Button, G. & Dourish, P. (1996) Technomethodology Paradoxes and Possibilities. In Proceedings of ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI

Durkheim Emile. 1933 the Division of Labor in Society. Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press

Frances, D. & Hester, S. (2004) an Invitation to Ethnomethodology: Language, Society and Interaction. New York: Sage

French, B. (2005) Issues and Innovations in Nursing Practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing 49(2), 125-134
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Ariely D And Norton M I

Words: 1044 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 15038728



Aldao, a., Nolen-Hoeksema, S., and Schweizer, S. "Emotion-regulation strategies

across psychopathology: A meta-analytic review." Clinical Psychology

Review, Vol. 30, No. 2 (2010): 217 -- 237.

Summary

This article considered of a meta-analytic review of data pertaining to six typical strategies of regulating emotion in relation to four different types of psychopathology. More specifically, the researchers considered the following emotion-regulation strategies: acceptance, avoidance, problem solving, reappraisal, rumination, and suppression; and they considered them in the context of each of the following psychological disorders: anxiety, depression, eating, and substance-related disorders. The method employed by the researchers consisted of primarily of systematic literature searches of studies presenting data about any of the six emotion-regulation strategies in the context of any of the four types of psychological disorders. The authors also conducted various supplementary searches of available databases, articles with potentially relevant literature cited as references, and solicited colleagues for their experience and recommendations…… [Read More]

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Face Recognition

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20461896

ecognition

Cognitive Process of Facial ecognition

We see so many faces each day. How does the mind keep track of them all? Something that seems so simple is actually quite complex. There are a number of cognitive processes that help the mind recognize facial features in general but also familiar faces that represent known associates. The brain categorizes and codes facial features and relationships between those features that allow for a final judgment on whom that face may belong to.

ecognizing faces is actually an incredibly complicated process. Not only does the individual have to see specific feature, but they also have to see the relationships between those features and thus classify them according to their memory bank of previously known facial structures and who they are associated with. This is known as first-order relational information, or the concept that relationships between facial features helps with identification (McKone, Crookes, &…… [Read More]

References

McKone, Elinor, Crookes, Kate, & Kanwisher, Nancy. (2008). The cognitive and neural development of face recognition in humans. McGovern Institute for Brain Research and Department of Brian & Cognitive Science MIT. School of Psychology, Australian National University. Web.  http://web.mit.edu/bcs/nklab/media/pdfs/McKone.Crookes.Kan.revfinal.pdf 

Phillips, Mary L., Bullmore, Edward T., Howard, Robert, Woodruff, Peter W.F., Wright, Ian C., Williams, Steven C.R., Simmons, Andrew, Andrew, Christopher, Brammer, Michael, & David, Anthony S. (1998). Investigation of facial recognition memory and happy and sad facial expression perception: an fMRI study. Psychiatric Research: Neuroimaging Section, 83(1998), 127-138.

Thompson, Robert W., Barnett, G. David, Humayun, Mark S., & Dagenelie, Gislin. (2003). Facial recognition using simulated prosthetic pixelized version. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 44(11), 5035-5042.
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MIT I Am Most Intrigued by the

Words: 320 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78402018

MIT

I am most intrigued by the prospect of studying the human brain in connection with a major course of study in the department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. As a musician with an interest in human cognitive development and learning, I have always been fascinated by the manner in which we produce and appreciate music, by the differences from person to person in that regard, and by the apparent relationship between musical aptitude and mathematical abilities. More particularly, as a pianist, I am interested in the apparent similarity between composing for the piano and computer coding.

The department at MIT that appeals to me the most is the department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. I hope to have the opportunity to study the conceptual applications of mathematical and computer modeling as they may apply to the analysis and understanding of neurological processes and mapping. As an amateur…… [Read More]

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intelligence learning memory cognition

Words: 1665 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41677365

Emotions affect how memories are processed, stored, and retrieved, which also impacts how learning takes place. Perhaps more importantly, emotions impact cognitive processes and learning. Neuroscience shows the ways thoughts are processed depends on one's cultural context and also emotional states. Thinking styles may be also linked to the learning process, as Zhang & Sternberg (2010) point out, and thinking styles are themselves related to cultural variables. The ways people process information therefore has to do with social learning as well as emotional learning and memory. Certain types of emotions may be more conducive to specific types of learning styles or learning behaviors. Emotions can also promote synchronized or chaotic neurological responses. These findings have implications for classroom design and pedagogy.

Wealth means far more than just possession of material goods. As Zhang & Sternberg (2010) point out, capital refers not only to assets in the traditional sense but also…… [Read More]

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Motor Control and Motor Learning

Words: 888 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39263005

new branch of science called Sports Science that respectively makes use of motor learning and motor control in the sports industry.

Sports Science

Motor learning and motor control is a field of science that is being studied from a sports point-of-view. Motor learning is connected to all the processes and conditions that affect one's ability to acquire skills, while motor control ascertains neuromuscular performance of individuals. Many people are taking great interest in the learning of motor skills and expertise, and the development of coordination. This new field of sports is based on the use of the knowledge base in the movement and sport sciences, cognitive sciences, and also physical therapy.

Sports science is a new area of study that is forcing people to explore the scientific explanation for David Beckham's superb soccer skills, and even wondering what would Wimbledon be like if say Pete Sampras had to use an…… [Read More]

References

Computational Learning and Motor Control Lab, available at http://www-slab.usc.edu/,accessed on: November 20, 2003

Graduate Programs: Masters in Motor Control, available at  http://www.indiana.edu/~kines/ms_motor.html , accessed on: November 20, 2003

JCU - Motor Learning and Motor Control, available at: www.jcu.edu.au/school/phtm/ises/lev3sub/sp34hbk.html, accessed on: November 20, 2003

Motor Behavior Specialization - Doctoral Degree Program, available at http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/ess/grad/motrbeh1.htm, accessed on: November 20, 2003
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Mris Legal and Scientific Review

Words: 5397 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2692818

There are three types of stimuli used, which are:

1) Targets;

2) Irrelevant; and 3) Probes.

These are used "in the form of words, pictures, or sounds..." which a computer presents for a second or even a partial second. Incoming stimulus, if it is worth noting, results in a P-300, which is an electrical brain response. The P-300 is part of a MERMER or a memory and encoding related multifaceted electroencephalographic response, which is a larger brain response.

Originally event related potentials (ERP) was the method used for studying brain activity information processing. The limitation of the ERP is that it causes elimination of all patterns that are complex and results in the meaningful signals also being lost. The multifaceted electroencephalographic response analysis or MERA was developed due to the limitation of the ERP. Farwell found that incorporation of this technique resulted in the elicitation of MERMER when the individual…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Taylor, Erich (2007) a New Wave of Police Interrogation? Brain Fingerprinting, the Constitutional Privilege against Self-Incrimination and Hearsay Jurisprudence

WWW.jltp.uiuc.edu/works/Taylor.htm

Pope, Harrison (nd) the Emperor's Tailoring. FMS Foundation Newsletter. Online available at http://www.fmsfonline.org/fmsf96.d31.html

Stetler, Russell and Wayland, Kathleen (2004) Capital Cases - Dimension of Mitigation. June 2004. Online available at http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache:8FdkQI0WFDsJ:www.fd.org/pdf_lib/Capital%2520CasesDimensions%2520of%2520Mitigation%2520Stetler.pdf+MRI:+forensics,+determination+of+guilt+or+innocence&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=50&gl=us.
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Annotated Bibliography on Teaching

Words: 2442 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 85583389

U.S. Education

James W. Guthrie, Paul T. Hill, Lawrence C. Pierce. (1997) einventing Public Education: How Contracting Can Transform America's Schools Illinois: The University of Chicago Press.

This book presents a creative approach to the current dilemma of raising public school performance levels. The author suggests that the incremental reforms and improvements attained over the past decade are not enough, and the system needs to consider a radically different structure in order to create incentive within the system to improve, rather than simply implement the latest strategy, and hope for better results. He suggests that individual school contracts, which give the school individualized control over funding and results will create incentive to change.

This book is an interesting approach to the educational competitive forces which are entering the marketplace. As a teacher, I want to maintain the cohesiveness of the public school system. But as a parent, I understand that…… [Read More]

Reinders Duit, Shawn M. Glynn. (1995) Learning Science in the Schools: Research Reforming Practice New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

This book, while also considering a constructivist approach, was able to make the connection between theory and practice. The book discussed the importance of hands on experimentation in the classroom, so that the student can experience for themselves the principles of science, and how those principle affect their lives.

A liked this book for the examples, and anecdoted taken from the classroom and woven into the text. When students are able to make pratical connections between theory and practice, which is the purpose of science education in the classroom, then they make two positive connections. The first is to the relevance of the instruction, but also practical education catches those students who may want to pursue science education as a career.
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Phineas Gage Prior to the Nineteenth Century

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27612187

Phineas Gage

Prior to the nineteenth century, the role of the brain in cognitive function was sorely misunderstood. As Shreeve (n.d) points out, the ancient Egyptians believed the seat of consciousness to be the organ of the heart and views of gray matter changed little in the ensuing millennia. It was not until the nineteenth century that evidence surfaced related to the preeminence of the brain in human cognitive affairs.

The first movement acknowledging the importance of the brain was ironically un-scientific. Phrenology did posit that the brain was a powerful organ capable of controlling human thought, emotion, and behavior. However, the rigid mapping of the brain that defines phrenology proved utterly ridiculous over time. It would take a series of remarkable patients for emerging brain scientists to uncover the mysteries of cognition -- and the interface between brain, mind, and body.

While Phineas Gage is one of the most…… [Read More]

References

Jeanty, J. (2011). Cognitive brain functions. eHow. Retrieved online: http://www.ehow.com/about_5312779_cognitive-brain-functions.html

"Phineas Gage's Story." Deakin University. Retrieved online:  http://www.deakin.edu.au/hmnbs/psychology/gagepage/Pgstory.php 

Shreeve, J. (n.d.). Beyond the brain. National Geographic. Retrieved online:  http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/health-and-human-body/human-body/mind-brain/ 

Twomey, S. (2010). Phineas Gage: Neuroscience's Most Famous Patient. Smithsonian. Retrieved online:  http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Phineas-Gage-Neurosciences-Most-Famous-Patient.html