Debate Essays (Examples)

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Debating Structured vs Unstructured Methods This Week

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85137375

Debating Structured vs. Unstructured Methods

This week, you have learned about the characteristics of structured and unstructured approaches in qualitative research. For this assignment, you will compare the advantages and disadvantages of each approach and discuss the merits of each.

To prepare for this assignment:

Consider what you have learned in your research courses about planning out the methodology for a research design. As you may recall, a structured or predetermined approach has been advocated in most, if not all, of your research textbooks up to this point.

eview Chapter 5 in Qualitative esearch Design: An Interactive Approach. In this chapter, Maxwell mentions the differences between a structured and an unstructured approach to qualitative methods. To what extent do you agree with the point-of-view that an unstructured approach to qualitative methods can be desirable? Under what circumstances might this be true?

With these thoughts in mind:

Write a response of…… [Read More]


Maxwell, J.A. (2005). Qualitative research design: An interactive approach (2nd Ed.).

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Debating Technology Society and the Environment

Words: 1357 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34066269

Technology, a very familiar phenomenon of modern world, is continuously enhancing its ways towards comforts and luxuries. New thoughts and ideas are coming with every passing second, and what started as only a blurred vision, now became a necessity for all mankind. These have become a need of today's society making the society very much involved in these technological reforms. Several debates have been made on the topic that although the level of our technology keeps on improving day by day, but do all of these hi-tech gadgets give us the proper advantages? Are we really aware of the two different sides of the same mirror, or are we just so much accustomed to all such things around us that we don't bother to look upon the other side? Amongst these debates, two of the very famous are classical McDermott vs. Mesthene debate of 1960s and contemporary debate of Joy…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bill Joy: Genomics, Nanotechnology and Robotics. Retrieved on 15/6/2012 from: 

Brown, John S. And Duguid, Paul. Chapter 4. A Response to Bill Joy and the Doom-and- Gloom Technofuturists. Retrieved on 15/6/2012 from:

Emannuel G. Mesthene vs. John McDermott. Retrieved on 15/6/2012 from:

James Burke Connections #1 - The Trigger Effect. Retrieved on 15/6/2012 from:
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Stem Cell Ethics Debating the Ethics of

Words: 1900 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10694307

Stem Cell Ethics

Debating the Ethics of Stem Cells

The term 'stem cells' can mean different things to different people. For some, it conjures images of medical miracles providing solutions for heart disease, diabetes, and dementia. For others, it terrifies with a future filled with cloned humans. Still others cringe at the thought of mass producing cultured human embryos for the sole purpose of providing organs and tissues for a paying public. As with most complex issues, news media coverage tends to exaggerate easily understood concepts at the expense of the overall truth and the public accordingly remains ignorant of the subtleties surrounding this debate. This seems to add fuel the emergence of polarized camps and a shrinking of a common middle ground. To better define this middle ground, this essay will discuss both sides of this debate and argue instead that the vast majority of people would likely support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Antiniou, Michael. "The Case Against & #8230;" Nature Medicine 7.4 (2001): 397-399. Web. The author argues that the use of embryonic stem cells for research and medicine poses significant ethical and moral issues that cannot be overcome. Of particular concern is the potential for reproductive cloning, a door that the author believes was opened when the UK government approved the use of embryonic stems cells for research and medicine.

Blow, Nathan. "In Search of Common Ground." Nature 451.7180 (2008): 855-858. Web. The author presents several issues facing researchers who work with stem cells and discusses why they are important to advancing this field of research. Of primary concern is developing standard protocols for producing stem cells and creating the necessary protocols and reagents that will allow the therapeutic use of stem cells in humans.

Leeb, C., Jurga, M., McGuckin, C., Forraz, N., Thallinger, C., Moriggl, R. et al. "New Perspectives in Stem Cell Research: Beyond Embryonic Stem Cells." Cell Proliferation 44.1 (2011): 9-14. Web. The focus of this article is the promises and limitations of embryonic, adult, and induced pluripotent stem cells, from the perspective of scientists working in this field. The ethical decisions concerning the use of embryonic stem cells are only mentioned in passing.

Power, Carl and Rasko, E.J. "Promises and Challenges of Stem Cell Research for Regenerative Medicine." Annals of Internal Medicine 155.10 (2011): 706-713. Web. The authors discuss in detail the three main types of stem cell technologies: embryonic, adult, and induced pluripotent. Ethical issues are mentioned occasionally, but not discussed.
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James Morone's by the People Debating American

Words: 686 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96389255

James Morone's By the People: Debating American Government addresses the meaty topics of federalism and nationalism. These trends in American political discourse have shaped much of American history, and it is crucial to engage in intelligent debates on these topics. Morone does an excellent job of presenting all sides of the debate and allowing readers to make decisions accordingly.

First, Morone presents an overview and definitions of terms, starting with the question, why federalism? The author responds to the prevailing federalist and anti-federalist beliefs by showing why a strong federal government might have been appealing to early American statesmen. In particular, Morone notes that the fragmented colonial governments needed to reconcile their interests in national security and free trade. Federalism arose largely out of practical matters. Choosing federalism often involves making calculated compromises between local self-interests and the resources that can only be generated on a larger scale. However, Morone…… [Read More]


Morone, J. (2012). By the People. Oxford University Press.