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Learning Styles in Essence Learning
Words: 1697 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4604283
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Choosing the most effective style that relates to one's individual personality is very useful in terms of increasing one's learning strengths. I have personally found that in reality most people combine a number of learning styles in developing their unique approach to learning. From my perspective I have found that a combination of both imaginative and analytical learning styles best suits my needs. The emphasis in my approach is however on the imaginative style as I am more comfortable with a learning style that explores various sources and views of reality in a discursive and open-ended way. At the same time the more considered and careful analytical approach is also useful in that it tends to 'ground' one in reality.

eferences

Durbin G. (2002) Interactive Learning in Museums of Art and Design.

etrieved February 23, 2009, at http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:2V3DNJpxFKkJ:www.vam.ac.uk/files/file_upload/5752_file.pdf+%22dynamic+learning+style%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=za&client=firefox-a

Exploring Psychology. Learning Styles. etrieved February 23, 2009, at http://www.dushkin.com/connectext/psy/ch06/learnsty.mhtml www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000308203

Guild,…

References

Durbin G. (2002) Interactive Learning in Museums of Art and Design.

Retrieved February 23, 2009, at http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:2V3DNJpxFKkJ:www.vam.ac.uk/files/file_upload/5752_file.pdf+%22dynamic+learning+style%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=za&client=firefox-a

Exploring Psychology. Learning Styles. Retrieved February 23, 2009, at  http://www.dushkin.com/connectext/psy/ch06/learnsty.mhtml  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000308203

Guild, P. (1994, January). Making Sense of Learing Styles. School Administrator, 51, 8. Retrieved February 26, 2009, from Questia database:  

Learning Culture and Memory
Words: 2090 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91902626
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Memory
A learning culture is an organizational practice, system and values that encourage and support individuals and organizations to increase performance levels, competence and knowledge. It promotes continuous support and improvement for an achievement of goals. Adjustment of current strategies can be done by adjusting to a trend, business model, capital model, launch strategy and making a great plan.
There are several ethical principles and professional standards of learning and cognition in the workplace. Some of them are; encouraging contact between faculty and student, developing cooperation between students, encouraging active learning and respecting adverse talents and learning techniques. Some implications that should be considered when working with others are; demonstrating respect at work, providing feedback with an impact, showing appreciation and overcoming fear of conflict.
WEEK 3 DISCUSSION
Memory Suppression in Alzheimer’s disease
Alzheimer’s diseases is chronic degenerative disease of the neurons. It causes about 60-70% of dementia cases. The…

Learning Over the Last Several
Words: 799 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7161121
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This will be accomplished by studying the following problem:

What specific tools and tactics can be the most successful in helping field psychologists to maximize their total amounts of learning comprehension?

Once this query has been answered, is when actuaries can find data that will identify the best approaches and how they can be applied (in a real world environment) by mental health professionals.

esearch Methods

The research method that will be used is the mixed approach. This is when there is a focus on specific tactics that will look at previous studies (i.e. The quantitative method). At the same time, actuaries are collecting specific samples from field psychologists (i.e. The qualitative methodology). These techniques were selected, because they can provide everyone with a background of key concepts. This will be used to establish a foundation of what processes are the most effective. ("Mixed Method esearch," 2011)

The Expected esults…

References

Mixed Method Research. (2011). Diversified Topics. Retrieved from: http://diversifiedtopics.com/tag/mixed-methods-research-definition/

Helms, J. (2011). Majoring in Psychology. Chichester: Wiley.

Mumford, a. (1997). Action Learning at Work. Aldershot: Gower.

Learning in Recent Years Is
Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69090854
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(3) According to the Multiple Intelligences Survey, I have quite a bit of intrapersonal and interpersonal intellegence and a moderate amount of musical and kinesthetic intelligence. This makes sense because I enjoy analyzing people and situations; and, I decided to leave my old job because I was bored sitting still behind a desk and not talking to anyone for most of the day.

As I was enjoying the surveys so much, also I took Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory and discovered that my learning style consists of doing and feeling or what Kolb would abbreviate as "CE/AE." When these findings are placed on the two-by-two grid by Kolb, my learning style is accommodating. An accommodating learning style is often times referred to as a "hands-on" style and one that relies upon intuition over logic. In fact, these findings also did not surprise me because I have to do something at least…

References

Codde, PhD, J.R. (2006). Using Learning Contracts in the College Classroom. Michigan State University.

Learning and Assessment People Learn
Words: 589 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47827205
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atching videos.

Color coding words and researching notes.

Outlining reading.

Using flashcards.

Using highlighters, circle words and underlining (Fleming, 2010).

If one focuses more on illustrative or graphical knowledge than on the expressions of what is being taught, they put themselves at a distinctive weakness since verbal and written knowledge is still the chief favored option for delivery of knowledge. One should apply their note taking and try to find occasions to make clear information to others by way of using words. A visual learner learns best when knowledge is given to them visually and in a printed language arrangement. In a classroom location, they profit from teachers who employ the blackboard or overhead projector in order to register the vital parts of a lecture, or who supply them with an outline in order to follow along with throughout the lecture. They profit from knowledge attained from textbooks and class…

Works Cited

"DVC Online," 2000, viewed 23 October2010,

Fleming, Grace. 2010, "Learning Styles," viewed 22 October 2010,



"Visual Thinking and Learning," 2010, viewed 23 October

Learning Memory Is an Important Construct of
Words: 1176 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18885927
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Learning

Memory is an important construct of human brain which performs a significant role in each and every activity of life. It is interesting to mention that brain is also a muscle and its energy can be increased by using it. There are many tactics found in literature and everyday practises to sharpen memory skills. However, the most effective technique is to play games which appear interesting to the players and involve memory cells as well. Before planning any exercise to sharpen memory, it is helpful to understand the basic memory process and the types of memory.

This report is about types of memory and their use in the daily life of a human being. The types of memory are elaborated using the example of a game. It is commonly said that memory becomes weak when it is frequently switched from one task to another. In other words, multitasking reduces…

References

Bernstein, D. (2010). Essentials of Psychology. USA: Wadsworth Publishing.

Dehn, M. (2010). Long-Term Memory Problems in Children and Adolescents. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.

Easysurf. (n.d). Retrieved from  http://www.easysurf.cc/memtstn.htm#top 

NCBI. (2009). Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2657600/

Learning Philosophy the Ability to Learn Is
Words: 859 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30098002
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Learning Philosophy

The ability to learn is one of man's most important talents, and, in order for one to improve this capacity, the respective person needs to focus on enriching his personal experience through any means available. Similarly, the respective person has to acknowledge that learning should be something that one longs for, regardless of the fact that many individuals tend to end their education after they finish high school. Learning should not be considered as being something exclusively connected to education, as people can gain important information from a series of environments other than educational institutes. Teachers are mainly responsible for the way that learners amass information, thus meaning that they have to develop methods of having students learn individually and on account of their personal values. Moreover, students need to be influenced in seeing learning as something positive and as something that they should gladly take on. In…

Learning Journal for Organizational Behavior
Words: 2302 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 24870783
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Given the capriciousness of the human condition with respect to continuing redefinitions of personal and professional success, human resource managers are faced with some difficult choices in formulating recommendations for best practices. Therefore, the learning journal would undergo a series of draft versions that would be used to solicit feedback from experts in the field who could point out flaws and areas that required additional research or support to be valid and trustworthy. The solicitation of feedback process would follow the guidance provided by Neuman (2003) who recommends having a manuscript reviewed by knowledgeable individuals who possess the requisite credentials to provide informed feedback. This feedback would be carefully reviewed and the collaborative process would result in changes and additions where they were deemed necessary and appropriate.

4)

Outcomes and New Learning

Some of the overriding themes that emerged from the learning episodes outlined above was that the more researchers…

References

American Psychological Association. (2002). Publication manual of the American Psychological

Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Cheverton, J. 2007. 'Holding our own: Value and performance in nonprofit organizations.'

Australian Journal of Social Issues, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 427-428.

Learning According to the University of Canberra's
Words: 1529 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84269176
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Learning

According to the University of Canberra's Academic Skills Centre (2008), learning is a highly complex process that "takes place at different levels of consciousness, and in different ways, in everything we do. Moreover, individual people learn in different ways and have their preferred learning styles." One of the keys to improving student learning is to understand the different types of learning styles and apply that knowledge to study habits and practices. Study skills are themselves behaviors that need to be learned like any other. Using a combination of disciplinary techniques and cognitive shifts, students can improve their capacity for learning. This will, in turn, help boost grades and test scores. However, learning in an academic context is about more than earning grades. Learning should ultimately enhance one's view of the world and increase tolerance of diversity.

The theory of multiple intelligences has formed the theoretical foundation for the study…

References

Armstrong, T. (2010). Multiple intelligences. Retrieved online:  http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.php 

Dartmouth College Academic Skills Center (2011). Managing your time. Retrieved online:  http://www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/success/time.html 

Gardner, H. (2006). Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons. Perseus.

Langer, J.A. (1986). Learning through writing: Study skills in the content areas. Journal of Reading. Feb 1986.

Learning Due Primarily to the Growing Trend
Words: 831 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71546963
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Learning

Due primarily to the growing trend of globalization, education has now become paramount to the overall success of society. International competition for both jobs and prominent positions poses both threats and benefits. For one, international competition encourages innovations which ultimately increases the overall quality of life for society. Innovations such as the internet have given rise to many unique and attractive markets. However, in order to take full advantage of the opportunities globalization and business presents, society must properly educate itself. Through education, civilization can fill the needed jobs required to utilize growing fields of innovation. The underlying principles within education have now been altered. New techniques are required to retain more information. Alternatively methods must be simple enough that students can utilize it in an effective manner within their respective careers. Many theories have been developed in regards to learning theories. These theories primarily consist of behavior, cognitive,…

Learning Methods Within a Learning Setting Each
Words: 1041 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4587189
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Learning Methods

Within a learning setting, each student comes with their individual package and it is not possible to have two pupils learning concepts in the same way despite the fact that they are taught with the same curriculum by the same educators as well. Naseem International School accommodates students from different cultures and backgrounds with different needs. The needs are not purely academic and learning needs only but also cultural and social needs hence care is needed. This paper looks at how teachers can plan for and assess the individual needs of students as well as identify and discuss strategies which promote and enhance the learning of students who have different educational needs (Project Ideal, 2008).

It is critical to asses the pupils in my class since they differ in terms of their abilities to learn and imbibe concepts in class. This assessment can be done as below:

Highest…

References

Douglous.D.Christensen, (1996). Teaching Strategies for Students with Diverse Learning Needs.

Centennial Mall South. Nebraska Department of Education. ( Pg 11-16).Retrieved January 24,2013 from  http://www.nebraskasocialstudies.org/pdf/tsfswdln.pdf 

Sue Watson, (2012). Differentiated Instruction and Assessment. Retrieved January 24, 2013

from  http://specialed.about.com/od/teacherstrategies/a/differentiated.htm

Learning to Read and Write Are Complementary
Words: 1445 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22351665
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Learning to read and write are complementary skills. While in the younger years, writing depends on reading skills, by middle and high school, they are complementary skills: reading is necessary to do writing assignments, while writing about what has read increases comprehension of the reading materials. For this reason, separating reading and writing instruction from content areas is arbitrary and will eventually interfere with the students' progress in those content areas.

From the day children are born, parents are told by doctors, teachers and other experts to read to them, and to read to them every day. They are told to do this because hearing language that contains story lines, rich language and vivid imagery facilitates language development and develops a desire to read. From "The Poky Little Puppy" to Rudyard Kipling, children's literature exists that uses language in exciting and colorful ways. Good children's literature doesn't sound the same…

Bibliography

Erickson, Lawrence.Jan. 11, 1998. "Informational literacy in the middle grades." The Clearing House.

Foley, Regina M. Winter, 2001. "Academic Charateristics of incarcerated youth and correctional educational programs: a literature review." Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

Gardill, M. Cathleen, and Jitendra, Asha K.April 15, 1999. "Advanced Story Map Instruction: Effects on the Reading Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities." Journal of Special Education: Vol.33.

Nourie, Barbara; Livingston, Lenski, and Davis, Susan.July 17, 1998. "The (in)effectiveness of content area literacy instruction for secondary preservice teachers." The Clearing House: 71: 372-375.

Learning Motivation Learning and Motivation
Words: 3469 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89082575
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') (Tingstrom et al., 226) in correspondence with the example provided by the researchers responsible for this evaluation, it may be deduced that such method of positive reinforcement implementation is best suited to a younger educational context such as grammar school. It may only be considered appropriate to attach the positive consequences of individual efforts with the capabilities of an entire class in settings where future prospects such as class rank and college admissions have not yet entered into the discourse over performance motivators.

Tingstrom et al. also identify the independent group-oriented contingencies, which "involve consequences, and criteria for all group members, but access to reinforcement for each group member is based on each member's performance (e.g., 'whoever makes a 90% or higher on the end chapter math test will be able to pick a prize from the treasure chest.' (Tingstrom et al., 226) in many ways, this has proved…

Bibliography

Bunderson, C.V. (1990). Computers in Educational Assessment: An Opportunity to Restructure Educational Practice. Educational Resource and Information Center.

Eisner, E. (1997). The Promise and Perils of Alternative Forms of Data Representation. Educational Researcher, Vol. 26, No. 6, p. 4-10.

Emerson, J. (1989). Review: Dead PoetsSociety. Jeems Cinepad. Online at http://cinepad.com/reviews/deadpoets.htm.

Florio-Ruane, Suzanne; Marianne George & Taffy E. Rapheal. (2004). Book Club Plus: Organizing Your Literacy Curriculum to Bring Students to High Levels of Literacy. Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, Vol. 27.

Learning Reinforcement for Learning to Effectively Take
Words: 1504 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81873442
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Learning Reinforcement

For learning to effectively take place, a number of concepts must be brought together and these include but are not in any way limited to environmental, emotional as well as cognitive influences. One of the most prominent learning theories is the social learning theory whose fronting was most prominently done by Albert andura amongst others.

The Social Learning Theory

The social learning theory is founded on the view that most learning is undertaken within the social context. However, according to Ronald L. Akers, the social learning theory must not only be taken to be a theory of peer influence.

With that in mind, the key concepts in this case include; modeling, imitation as well as observational learning. The social learning theory has four basic principles with the first principle stating that most of the learning is informed by an observation of behavior. Here, the reasoning is that the…

Bibliography

Akers, Ronald. Social Learning and Social Structures: A General Theory of Crime and Deviance. Transaction Publishers, 2009

Griffin, Ricky Organizational Behavior: Managing People and Organizations. Cengage Learning, 2009

Sarafino, Edward. Self-Management: Using Behavioral and Cognitive Principles to Manage Your Life. John Wiley and Sons, 2010

Ronald Akers, Social Learning and Social Structures: A General Theory of Crime and Deviance (Transaction Publishers, 2009), 25.

Learning Specialized Vocabulary
Words: 2788 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87234390
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Learning Specialized Vocabulary

Educators that provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) must provide students with the primary concepts of English in the early stages of language development. As students progress and become more familiar with the language and its idiosyncrasies, advanced training is likely to acclimate students to much of the daily slang as well as complex vocabulary that they hear from native English speakers in routine conversation. It is the responsibility of the ESL instructor to provide this teaching at the appropriate juncture, and the most advantageous route is specialized vocabulary. The following paper will provide a discussion of the concept of word elements in the English language. The paper will continue with an analysis of the methods by which ESL instructors teach technical or specialized vocabulary in their coursework, including various learning strategies for students. Finally, a brief discussion of the importance of specialized vocabulary…

References

American Guidance Service, Inc. (1997). Building Vocabulary

Skills. Minnesota: American Guidance Service, Inc.

Cohen, A., & Steinberg, J. (1983). Effects of three types of vocabulary on readability of intermediate grade science textbooks: an application of Finn's transfer feature theory. Reading Research Quarterly, 19(1), 87-101.

Coxhead, A. (2000). A new academic word list. TESOL

Learning Plan the Aorn Congress
Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Professional Writing Paper #: 11972086
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Exposure to cutting-edge technologies helps me understand the principles upon which technologies work, and can also prepare me for being able to use such technologies effectively in the future. Furthermore, I am interested in how it can transform hospital administration. I believe that one of the best ways to cut costs and reduce medical errors is to transition to a more robust it system.

Leadership Skills: Within the next five years, I intend to take on more challenging roles in my institutions. I want to understand the bigger picture of how hospital administration works and what I can do to improve it. At the AORN Congress, I will meet and network with perioperative nurses who have incorporated leadership positions into their daily work. In ten years, I may want to transition my career entirely into an administrative position.

Administrative Vision: he main reason why I am attending the 2011 AORN…

Technologies: While I work in an institution that is committed to acquiring the most advanced medical technologies on the market, I believe that perioperative nurses are too narrowly focused on what is being used in their operating rooms. I want to learn about the cutting-edge technologies that are being used in more progressive institutions around the world. Exposure to cutting-edge technologies helps me understand the principles upon which technologies work, and can also prepare me for being able to use such technologies effectively in the future. Furthermore, I am interested in how it can transform hospital administration. I believe that one of the best ways to cut costs and reduce medical errors is to transition to a more robust it system.

Leadership Skills: Within the next five years, I intend to take on more challenging roles in my institutions. I want to understand the bigger picture of how hospital administration works and what I can do to improve it. At the AORN Congress, I will meet and network with perioperative nurses who have incorporated leadership positions into their daily work. In ten years, I may want to transition my career entirely into an administrative position.

Administrative Vision: The main reason why I am attending the 2011 AORN Congress is to present myself with a bigger picture of the healthcare industry. I understand my role in the industry as a perioperative nurse, delivering the best possible quality of care to patients and keeping abreast with the techniques that save lives. The next step is to understand the decision-making processes that are at the root of our work. Issues like financial allocation, budgeting, account management, and human resources development are areas in which I need to improve my knowledge. Seeing the bigger picture of the healthcare industry is my goal. Therefore, ethical and legal considerations as well as issues related to corporate culture and improving the workplace environment are part of my overall learning plan goal. The 2011 AORN Congress will be instrumental in helping me become a more effective leader in healthcare.

Learning Lesson From Frederick Douglass
Words: 589 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 90908288
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Douglass' tenacity reminds me of Martin Luther King, who lived in a world where African-Americans knew how to read and write but were still suffering under the weight of racism. King did not become violent and irrational in order to win people to his way of thinking. Even when he was arrested and put in jail for nonviolent protests, he spoke with a calm and unwavering voice. He knew in his heart what was right and he was smart enough to figure out a way to make his dreams come true without violence. King face adversity but he never gave up and he chose to seek his dream in an unconventional way, much like Douglass. He saw the obstacles and, rather than let them stop him, he found another way.

I think Douglass' persistence and perseverance are examples for anyone who wishes to do anything. Douglass' goal, learning to read…

Work Cited

Douglass, Frederisck. "Learning to Read and Write. The Blair Reader. New Jersey: Pearson. 2004.

Learning the Role of Social
Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95227898
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n other words, it can be criticized for being somewhat discursive and for not providing any form of comparative analysis.

Alternatively, one could argue that methodologically the research falls into the category of a case study, a legitimate form of intensive qualitative research. n the final analysis the article does provide some illuminating insights into the possibilities of literature for social and emotional development in gifted students.

Article 3: The Connection between Social-Emotional Learning and Learning Disabilities: mplications for ntervention by Maurice J. Elias.

The author of this article identifies a number of problematic social and emotional areas for the learning disabled or special needs student. These include the recognition of emotions in self and others; the regulation and management of strong emotions and the recognition of strengths and areas of need ( Elias, 2004). The article also reviews the literature and theoretical positions on this topic. Furthermore, the author…

In order to deal with these problems, the author suggests that in the first instance these inabilities and difficulties in the student must be recognized by the teacher or the therapist. Once they have been recognized, a responsive and caring approach should be taken. The teacher becomes involved in the process of articulating "... The strategies that students must use when they feel the strong feelings that are preventing them from learning effectively..."( Elias, 2004). Furthermore, the teacher should help the student to recognize his or her strengths. This can go a long way to reducing any sense of guilt or inadequacy.

While this study does not provide any quantitative methodology or strategy it does provide a comprehensive overview of the theoretical aspects of the problems and the way that these problems can be addressed by the teacher. What is clearly implied throughout is that the innate talents and abilities of the special needs student enhanced by the caring and responsive techniques and strategies on the part of the teacher.

It could be argued that this study is possibly not as rigorous and methodologically intensive as the first article discussed in the present paper. However, what is clear from an analysis of the study by Elias is that the author provides a comparatively comprehensive overview of the issues and problems at stake and also supports this with practical examples of methods

Learning - Learning Has Been
Words: 547 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1053829
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Within each of these are discriminatory and generalized patterns of learning; and can be incorporated into learning models.

My own learning style is a combination of listening (learning from others) and then doing. It depends on the material; for any tactile operation, I find it easier to understand by touching and manipulating than simply reading in a manual how to perform the task. I believe I make clear use of discrimination in learning; responding to different stimuli with different responses. When the learning task is more scholarly in nature, I tend to combine visual and aural methods with kinesthetic and write down, or outline material.

Burton, N. (March 15, 2012). Hide and Seek: Understanding Self-Deception, Self-Sabotage

nd More. Psychology Today. Retrieved from:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201203/self-deception-series-repression-and-denial

Burton's article is a combination of the psychodynamic and behavioral models of psychological investigation. The major point of the article is that humans are not always rational,…

And More. Psychology Today. Retrieved from:

 http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201203/self-deception-series-repression-and-denial 

Burton's article is a combination of the psychodynamic and behavioral models of psychological investigation. The major point of the article is that humans are not always rational, but are rationalizing. For instance, the trauma of 9/11, even for those not directly affected, caused a number of people to commit suicide. Moreover, if someone is the victim of beatings as a child, they tend to repress those memories, internalize some of the actions, and possibly have problems forming attachments. This, according to Dr. Burton, is the mind's way of defending and coping with stress. It becomes part of the unconscious, but often resurfaces in odd forms. The healthy individual can get on a path to deal with these issues; talk through them, analyze, and find coping mechanisms.

Learning Knowledge Centered the Authors Use
Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56731108
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Another way of combining these two approaches is by having the students involved in the process of what is learned and how. Each learner brings something different to the classroom, so will want to take away something different as well. The teacher and student can work together to set goals of what is to be achieved. Similarly, the students need continual feedback, so they know how they are accomplishing these goals. Lastly, since all students do learn differently, the classroom environment has to be a place for sharing new ideas. Students can learn considerably by seeing how their peers perceive the same drawing, or science experiment or historical event. They gain both knowledge and acquire new learning about their own abilities and that of others in the room. More importantly, this gives each child a similar opportunity to express him or herself and build self-esteem, regardless of the students' varying…

Learning & Memory the Accuracy of Memory
Words: 1445 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87602775
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Learning & Memory

The Accuracy of Memory

The research I completed for this assignment was fairly straightforward. Upstairs in my living room on a day in which I had yet to leave the house, I tried to imagine my front door. I did so without having looked at it for at least 14 hours -- since I had arrived at home the evening before. Once I was able to visualize the door, I then wrote down all of the details that I could conceive of related to its physical appearance. My annotations on this subject included the fact that the door is white and is at the base of approximately 20 steps which lead to the main unit of the domicile. In this tall foyer, the white of the door stands out against the creme color of the walls around it (I was able to see this same color on…

References

Baars, B. (1997). In the Theater of Consciousness: the Workspace of the Mind. San Diego: Oxford University Press.

Dehon, H., Laroi, F. "Affective valence influences participant's susceptibility to False Memories and Illusory Recollection." Emotion. 10 (5): 627-639.

Gallo, D.A. (2010). "False memories and fantastic beliefs: 15 years of DRM illusion." Memory & Cognition. 38 (7): 833-848.

Lindsay, D.F., Read, D.J. (1994). "Psychotherapy and memories of childhood sexual abuse: a cognitive perspective." Applied Cognitive Psychology. 8: 281-338.

Learning Journal Personal Reflection Personal Reflection Now
Words: 340 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25488777
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Learning Journal: Personal eflection

Personal eflection

Now more than ever before, diversity is a real issue for the American society, and with this demographic change comes the need to develop strategies and techniques for making people more appreciative of the gender, ethnic, religious, and cultural differences that constitute the fabric of society. One's gender, ethnicity, race, religion, or sexual orientation does not define who they are and what their abilities are. These elements, therefore, ought not to be used as the primary bases for assigning positions, benefits, or advancement opportunities at the workplace. Just because someone is male is no guarantee that they will display better performance in a leadership or supervisory position than a female candidate would. We may consider men better-placed for such positions because we think of them…

References

Alonso, M. (2012). Best Inclusion Practices: LGBT Diversity. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan

Community Tool Box. (2014). Strategies and Activities for Reducing Racial Prejudice and Racism. Kaplan University. Retrieved 22 March 2015 from  http://ctb.dept.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/culture/cultural-competence/reduce-prejudice-racism/main 

O'Brien, R. (2013). Bodies in Revolt: Gender Disability and a Workplace Ethic of Care. New York, NY: Routledge

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. (2001). Affirmative Action. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved 24 March 2015 from  http://www.civilrights.org/resources/civilrights101/affirmaction.html

Learning Case Study - Literacy
Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72161594
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" I still do that, " and for the question of what happens when you get stuck on a word he replied, "Just mainly that or just ask somebody"

Subject 2: Was a much more confident reader and this is most likely because of the ability to use phonics' based reading and thinking process. The subject had advanced phonics' in a previous grade and those principles have carried forward into the self-esteem and confidence in regard to reading. He has a viable solution for answering his own questions regarding words or sounds he does not know.

According to the analysis of the spelling features, both boys are in similar spelling stages, however, the phonics background in subject 2 will help him develop faster as both a readier and a speller. The children were both using phonetic spelling techniques to pass the spelling portion of the assessment, however, subject one is…

Discovery-Based Instruction Enhance Learning Allusions
Words: 1489 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74196307
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Ali Gunay Balim's journal article, "The effects of discovery learning on students' success and inquiry learning skills" provides empirical evidence that attest to the virtue of guided discovery learning. The research performed in this article divided 57 seventh graders into science classes in which one group was taught using guided discovery learning techniques and the other was taught using conventional methods for instruction. The primary basis for the data was the usage of a pretest and a post-test; each group took the pretest without having any exposure to guided discovery learning. During the posttest, the control group still had no experience with this method of instruction, whereas the other group had four weeks' worth of this type of instruction. The statistical data overwhelmingly supported the virtues of guided discovery-based instruction. With a t-value of 9.76, the experimental group -- taught using discovery instruction that was guided -- consistently performed higher…

References

Alfieri, L., Brooks, P.B., Aldrich, N.J., Tenenbaum, H.R. (2011). "Does discovery-based instruction enhance learning?." American Psychological Association. 103 (1): 1-18. Retrieved from  http://www.societyforqualityeducation.org/parents/constructivism.pdf 

Balim, a.G. (2009). "The Effects of discovery learning on students' success and inquiry learning skills." Eurasian Journal of Education and Research. 35, 1-20.

Flores, M.M., & Kaylor, M. (2009). "The effects of a direct instruction program on the fraction performance of middle school students at-risk for failure in mathematics."

Journal of Instructional Psychology, 34(2), 84-94.

Project-Based Learning
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Learning: Educational Influence and Technique

Project-Based Learning

With the advancement of new teaching and learning techniques such as Outcomes-Based Education, there has been a revolution in the education industry. Students and their needs have become the center of the education effort. With new paradigms such as project-based learning and problem-based learning, these students are prepared for the job market with an efficiency that has never before been the case. The effect this has on education in general is that both teachers and learners benefit from the activities in the classroom. Students are more motivated, and teachers understand the needs and problems faced by students better.

Project-based learning is then used in the classroom by giving students projects that they are expected to complete. These projects are relevant to both the subject field, and the profession targeted by the subject. In this way students learn through practice the various techniques required…

Businesses Learning Organizations in Today's
Words: 593 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 86745017
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Employees attend class one day a week for eight semesters over a four-year period of time. The program specifically teaches methodology.

A virtual learning environment is part of the program and students and faculty are kept in contact via computer or laptop. Employees enroll in the Next Step Program over a four-year period of time. Each student is given a laptop to use during their studies. The curriculum is designed as a virtual campus type of situation. Full-time Verizon employees in New York or New England who are members of either the CWA or the IBEW are eligible. Final selection is based on seniority.

Both companies offer unique programs to help continue the education of their employees. They not only focus on teaching methods in-house, but by utilizing other unique methods too. Verizon goes above and beyond in helping to continue the education of employees both personally and professionally. Each…

References

1990., & States, M.U. (n.d.). Learning Organisations: Case Study Page. School of Engineering. Retrieved April 17, 2010, from http://www.see.ed.ac.uk/~gerard/MENG/MEAB/learning_organisation/case.html

Leadership for Learning Seminar. (n.d.). Redirect. Retrieved April 17, 2010, from http://mysite.verizon.net/vze4qtye/index.html

Six Sigma Learning Topic - Motorola USA. (n.d.). Motorola Home - Motorola USA. Retrieved April 17, 2010, from  http://www.motorola.com/Business/U.S.-EN/Motorola+University/Six+Sigma+Black+Belt+Handbook/Six+Sigma+Learning+Topic

Teaching Techniques to Motivate Students
Words: 4053 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 44686984
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(Fletcher & Crochiere, 2004)

Motivation to Learn

Motivation to learn can be defined as the degree of cognitive effort invested to achieve educational goals (Li, 2003). It can also be understood as the degree of "seriousness" with which a student attempts to address the commitments and targets school with the purpose of: a) master the knowledge and skills rather than and get away with doing the minimum, b) clearly verify the status of their knowledge rather than try to complete the task independently of being sure that they actually learned something (MacIntyre, 2002).

Marshall (2001) have proposed to distinguish two types of motivation to learn, one that manifests itself as a personality trait and one that manifests itself as a state. In the first sense, the concept refers to a general provision that allows a student to perceive learning as an inherently valuable and satisfactory and therefore to engage in…

References

Barbetta, P., Norona, K. & Bicard, D. (2005). Classroom behavior management: A dozen common mistakes and what to do instead. Preventing School Failures. Vol. 49, Issue 3, p 11-19.

Bear, G.G. (2008). Best practices in classroom discipline. In Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.), Best Practices in School Psychology V (1403-1420). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists

Bear, G.G., Cavalier, A., & Manning, M. (2005). Developing self-discipline and preventing and correcting misbehavior. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Fletcher, L., & Crochiere, N. (2004). How to Design and Deliver Speeches (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Cooperative Learning Advantages and Disadvantages
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Among the last advantages of cooperative learning in the classroom is the increase in competition that every student experiences as s/he collaborates with other students/teammates in the process of accomplishing a particular task or activity. There is one caveat, however, in stating this observation about cooperative learning: increased competence is induced only in learning processes wherein information used by students are similar or identical with each other (uchs, 2004:310-1). An increase in the competitive nature of learning using the cooperative learning technique stimulates students' greater desire to perform better, and to outdo other students in accomplishing the task at hand.

While there are advantages to cooperative learning as a teaching and learning tool, there are also disadvantages that can become impediments or hindrances to the students' further learning and the teacher's role as a moderator or to serve as the students' guide to learning.

Among the enumerated disadvantages to cooperative…

Bibliography

Bandiera, M. (2006). "Active/cooperative learning in schools." Journal of Biological Education, Vol. 40, Issue 3.

Buchs, C. (2004). "Resource interdependence, student interactions, and performance in cooperative learning." Educational Psychology, Vol. 24, Issue 3.

Coke, P. (2005). "Practicing what we preach: an argument for cooperative learning opportunities for elementary and secondary educators." Education, Vol. 126, Issue 2.

Laatsch, L. (2005). "Cooperative learning effects on teamwork attitudes in clinical laboratory science students." Clinical Laboratory Science, Vol. 18, Issue 3.

Bruffee Myers Holt Collaborative Learning
Words: 1822 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 45499904
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But that is partly because what I have to suggest is not a method but a stance towards one's teaching. This stance requires a sort of doubleness: an awareness that one's course is part of an ideological structure that keeps people from thinking about their situation, but also a belief that one can resist this structure and help students to criticize it' (Myers 172). Even while using collaborative learning techniques, Myers does not want students to lose their individuality. This is also Holt's goal but it is unclear if this as easy in 'theory' as it is in fact, based on the experiences she chronicles. Holt calls the Bruffee approach 'democratic' but in a perfect democracy there can be a loss of valuable minority opinions.

riting, it could be argued, is designed to express individualism. But not all authors agree with this idea. John Trimbur's "Consent and Difference in Collaborative…

Works Cited

Bruffee, Kenneth a. "Collaborative learning and the 'Conversation of Mankind'." College

English, 46. 7 (Nov., 1984): 635-652

Holt, Mara. "The importance of dissent in collaborative learning." The Writing Center Journal,

28.2 (2008).

Active Learning Style in Hands-On
Words: 4694 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 94712431
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Roles can be rotated regularly to give all team members experience; and 5) Task or sequence interdependence

This occurs when one group member must first complete his/her task before the next task can be completed. For example, collecting water samples might be assigned to two group members, while research on how to collect samples is done by two other group members. (Foundation Coalition, 2009)

Cooperative learning according to the University of Wisconsin cooperative learning group is stated to be structures that "...generate ideas for open-ended questions or problems. The instructor poses an open-ended question and asks groups of students to generate multiple responses. Groups then summarize their responses and report in one of several ways: in writing, random calling, groups reporting to each other, etc. A faculty member might apply one of these structures at the beginning of a new topic by briefly describing the topic and then asking groups…

Bibliography

Berquist, WH and Phillips, SR (1975) Getting Students Involved in the Classroom: A Handbook for Faculty Development. Council for the Advancement of Small Colleges. (pp.114-117)

Chickering, a., and Gamson, Z. (1987) "Seven Principles for Good Practice," AAHE Bulletin, 39:3-7, ED 282-491, 6pp, MF-01; PC-01.

Diesel, Elizabeth, Allen, Michael, Schreiber, Madeline, and Borrego, Maura (2006) Improved Student Learning in Large Classes by Incorporating Active Learning with a New Design of Teaching Studies. 36th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference 18-21 Oct 2006. San Diego, CA.

Johnson, D.W., Johnson, R.T., and Smith, K. (1991) Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom, Edina, MN: Interaction Book Company

Cooperative Learning Harry Wong and
Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59795014
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It prepares kids for the type of thinking essential to living and working in a very social world. Through this involvement, a teacher can make a huge impact in a student's life, (ong 2002).

Spencer Kagan believes that the levels of student participation should be equal in order to maximize student potential. ith all students actively engaging at the same level, each student will increase their capability of understanding the subject material. He provides several techniques to incorporate students participating with each other. By using techniques such as worksheets encouraging communication between students, each individual student engages in a cooperative style of learning the material at hand, (Fortenburg 1998). Spencer Kagan spreads his own idea of cooperation learning through technique workshops throughout the country.

Like Harry ong, Kagan encourages cooperation not only between teachers and students, but most importantly, between student and student. By using group activities, Kagan's method forces…

Works Cited

Fortenberry, Gary. "Kagan Cooperative Learning Techniques." Woodrow Wilson

National Leadership Program for Teachers. Found at http://wwwWoodrow.org/teachers/bi/1998/presentations/fortenberry

Kagan, Spencer. Cooperative Learning. Kagan Publishing. 1993.

Wong, Harry. "Effective Practices Apply to All Teachers." Teachers.Net. October

Cooperative Learning Science Model for
Words: 2163 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 39322807
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Teacher could also have class come up with a name for the substance.

Anticipation Guide

Name____ Date

Prediction

Please list five words that you think will describe the texture of the "Mystery Substance"

After the Activity

Please list five words that actually did describe the texture of the "Mystery Substance" (you can use some of the same words, but ONLY if they are accurate)

Science- Grade 2

Key Concepts: _Estimation

Science Objective:

Students will learn the basics of scientific methods for science inquiry: i.e. state the problem, formulate the hypothesis, conduct the experiment and analyze and verbalize the results

Language Objective:

Basic: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of new vocabulary words related to the lesson. This will provide a foundation for future scientific lessons using similar vocabulary words.

Higher: Students will be able to articulate their discoveries verbally and in writing.

Materials:

Large, clear cup

Small, clear…

References

Gunter, M.A., Estes, T.H., & Schwab, J. (2003). Instruction: A models approach (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Kagan, S. (1994) Cooperative Learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing. http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/intech/cooperativelearning.htm

Verbal Learning This Is a
Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91944194
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If the items used as stimulus words in a PA task are too similar, discrimination ability decreases, leading to errors in recall. Another difficulty may occur with learning of response items, i.e. meaningful responses are learned easier than non-meaningful responses (Minnesota State University Moorhead, n.d.).

Free recall learning -- retain as much information and recall it regardless of its order. This method is unstructured; learners can remember words in any order they would like. Although dissimilar from serial learning, free recall learning will also illustrate a serial position effect comparable to that obtained with serial learning.

The more an item is rehearsed, the greater tendency the item will be able to be recalled. Organizing information into a meaningful system will also help the recall ability. An example of this would be categorical clustering -- breaking down a large group of specific words into several smaller groups organized by similarity, such…

Bibliography

Boughner, R. (n.d.). Verbal Learning II. Retrieved May 20, 2009, from Rogers State University: www.rsu.edu/faculty/RBoughner/courses/Learning/Verbal%20Learning.ppt.

Minnesota State University Moorhead. (n.d.). Chapter 6 verbal learning. Retrieved May 20, 2009, from Minnesota State University Moorhead: https://www.mnstate.edu/malonech/Psy342/Terry%20Notes/Verbal%20Learning%20T6.htm

The verbal (linguistic) learning style. (n.d.). Retrieved May 20, 2009, from learning-styles-online:  http://www.learning-styles-online.com/style/verbal-linguistic/

Curriculum the Learning and Skills Sector Lss
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Curriculum

The learning and skills sector (LSS) is an Essential part of educational development in the United Kingdom. For many years this educational program faltered and was not taken seriously. However in recent years Legislators in the UK have dedicated a great deal of time and resources to improving LSS. According to Maxwell (2009)

The Learning and Skills Sector (LSS) in England is diverse, comprising further education (FE) colleges, sixth-form colleges, personal and community development learning and work-based training and learning in other adult settings such as prisons and the uniformed services. Over the last 15 years the sector has moved from a position of 'benign neglect' (Young et al. 1995, 7) to being placed 'at the forefront of UK's attempt to raise its skill profile' (Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills, and Department for Children, Schools and Families 2007, 3). Developing the workforce needed to support this ambitious agenda…

Works Cited

Curriculum for diversity guide. Retrieved January 4, 2011 from: http://shop.niace.org.uk/media/catalog/product/C/u/Curriculum-for-Diversity-Guide.pdf

Fisher, R., and Webb, K. (2006) Subject specialist pedagogy and initial teacher training for the learning and skills sector in England: the context, a response and some critical issues. Journal of Further and Higher Education. 30(4), 337 -- 349

Foundation Learning Curriculum for adults. Retrieved January 4, 2011 from:

http://readingroom.skillsfundingagency.bis.gov.uk/sfa/adult_flc_-_factsheet_-_april_10_-_final.doc

Tall Buddies Peer-Assisted Learning Initiative
Words: 6521 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34945821
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Methods for evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of peer-assisted learning programs are discussed as well, followed by a summary of the literature review.

Background and Overview.

The growing body of scholarly evidence concerning peer tutoring has been consistent in emphasizing the powerful effects that children can exert on the academic and interpersonal development of their classmates and/or other students (Ehly & Topping, 1998). For example, Bloom (1984) reported early on that one-on-one tutoring by a fully skilled peer was more effective than both conventional (i.e., teachers' lecturing) and mastery learning (i.e., student- regulated) methods of teaching. Across several replications of academic content and student age levels, Bloom (1984) reported that peer tutoring programs produced effect sizes on the order of 2 standard deviations above the mean of the control group (i.e., students receiving conventional lecture-based instruction), compared with 1.3 standard deviations for mastery learning (effect sizes larger than.25 of 1…

References

Adelgais, a., King, a., & Staffieri, a. (1998). Mutual peer tutoring: Effects of structuring tutorial interaction to scaffold peer learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 90(1), 134.

Afflerbach, P., Baumann, J.F., Duffy-Hester, a.M., Hoffman, J.V., McCarthey, S.J. & Ro, J.M. (2000). Balancing principles for teaching elementary reading. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Arreaga-Mayer, C., Gavin, K.M., Greenwood, C.R., Terry, B.T., & Utley, C.A. (2001). Classwide peer tutoring learning management system. Remedial and Special Education, 22(1), 34.

Bloom, B.S. (1984). The 2 sigma problem: The search for methods of group instruction as effective as one-to-one tutoring. Educational Researcher, 13, 4-16.

Integrate Evaluation Techniques in Your Daily Work
Words: 5565 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 65600921
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integrate evaluation techniques in your daily work routine to improve your job performance? (Answer taken from PDF uploaded - Program_Evaluation_-_Overview_and_Definitions_PowerPoint)

Gredler explains that evaluation is the structural accumulation of any and knowledge that helps to make informed and profitable choices and corporate decisions M.B. Dignan further adds that all basic evaluations are procedural assessments of the results and overall functionality of any and all programs. P.D. Sarvela and a colleague R.J. Mcdermott gave a more detailed explanation in 'Health Education Evaluation and Measurement' by saying that basic evaluation was the utilization of a number of processes that were used to understand and decipher if a program had been functionalized in accordance to the aim with which it was created. Hence, basic assessment of a program is to highlight whether or not the program was able to practically attain the objectives it had originally theoretically set. Research procedures on the other…

Culture Affects the Way Students Learn Mathematics
Words: 1825 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 423849
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culture affects the way students learn mathematics, and how different cultures learn differently. Students in Korea and Japan learn differently than students in the United States for a number of reasons. Statistically, Asian students seem to do better at mathematics than American children do, and they way they learn their mathematics at an early age may be on reason this is so.

Identification and Investigation

US students often show lower test scores in understanding mathematics, while Asian students consistently score higher. There are many reasons for this, from different cultures to different methods of instruction. For example, one researcher found that Japanese children think of numbers differently, and see their relationships in depth. She writes, "She discovered part of the reason was the way they named their numbers. Following ten, they say, "ten 1, ten 2, ten 3" for 11, 12, 13, and say "2-ten, 2-ten 1, 2-ten 2" for…

References

Bharucha, J. (2008). America can teach Asia a lot about science, technology, and math.

Chronicle of Higher Education; Vol. 54 Issue 20, pA33-A34.

Cotter, J. (2009). Right start mathematics. Retrieved 13 Nov. 2009 from the Abacus.com Web site:  http://www.alabacus.com/Downloads/RightStart%20Mathematics.pdf . 1-5.

Editors. (2000). How Japanese students learn math. Christian Science Monitor; Vol. 92 Issue 127, p17.

Technology Learning Is One of
Words: 3267 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96055659
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he 1992 sessions, for example, consisted of approximately twenty-five pupils between 10 and 15 years of age who were mainly drawn from the Seattle area, plus about a dozen staff members.

he daily timetable was organized around activities such as computer graphics, electronic music, and VR itself. he end goal, however, was to build a virtual world. Pupils worked in small groups on the process of world-building and were encouraged to work as teams. (Schroeder, 1996, p. 70)

he technology for this system consisted of both the developmental tools, the PCs and special plug in technology and an immersive system, not afforded to all program trials but very useful here, as can be seen by the outcomes and the engaged student body of the program.

he equipment for building worlds was Swivel 3-D software (see Kalawsky 1993:211-212), and the immersive system consisted of a VPL system with a glove or…

Technology the Journal (Technological Horizons in Education), 26(7), 61. Retrieved October 24, 2004, from Questia database,  http://www.questia.com .

US Department of Education website, 2004, "Educational Technology Fact

Sheet" at  http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/os/technology/facts.html .

Influence of Technology on Teaching and Learning Styles
Words: 2412 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 49970916
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archetypal scene of the educational process is for most of us a child and a teaching sitting next to each other, their heads bowed together intently over a book. It is an island, in this high-tech world in which we live, of the low-tech: A world that depends upon communication and human interactions rather than machines and gadgets. Education seems to be one of those realms in which it is still possible to believe in and practice the humanistic arts.

But this idealized picture of the teaching process is, like so many idealized pictures, not exactly accurate - as well as being a little out of date. Education has, in fact, always made use of technology in our human attempt to pass onto each new generation what the generation before it holds to be important. Slate boards and books were high-tech in their own time - and most children now…

References

Baker, C. (2001). Foundations of bilingual education and bilingualism, 3rd ed. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.

Blevins, D. (2002). Personal communication.

California State Code, Education Code, Section 305-306.

Florida Department of Education, http://www.firn.edu/doe

Differentiated Learning Philosophy and Practice
Words: 992 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85023021
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Students would be graded upon their own, individual contributions, but they could not let down their fellow group participants. They would have to complete their task, and as the task was within their framework of ability, this would not seem too daunting. Another suggested method of behavior management to ensure student compliance with assignments is to instate a points system, whereby a student can earn a maximum number of points for performing specific diverse tasks relating to a unit, which they can select themselves and tailor to their own interests and levels of ability (Childs, 2007).

Lesson Plan

To teach a reading unit to a third grade class making us of the popular E.B. White classic Charlotte's Web, a teacher might assign a vocabulary list to the students, from which they would be tested. However, students would only have to look up words they did not know. Students could be…

References

Childs, Peggy. (2007). "Holes." Help4Teachers.com. Retrieved 2 Jun 2007 at  http://www.help4teachers.com/holes.htm 

Differentiating instruction." (26 Apr 2004). Enhance Learning With Technology. 2004.

Retrieved 2 Jun 2007 at:  http://members.shaw.ca/priscillatheroux/differentiating.html 

Fuller, Donna. (2007). "Charlotte's Web: Chapter 1." Alta Murrieta Elementary School.

Learning Cognitive Theory of Learning
Words: 5035 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10711915
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When children are given the option between a reward they would like and the internal desire to learn something, most children would rather have the reward. That is also true of many adults, whether they are in an educational setting or a business setting. Still, that does not mean that intrinsic interest cannot come along with extrinsic reward, or that operant theory is completely wrong. Many educators mix operant theory with cognitive theory in an effort to provide those with different learning styles more of an opportunity to learn and develop. This helps to reach the largest number of students per educator, improving the overall educational goal.

ognitive Theory of Learning

Introduction

The cognitive theory of learning has been part of education since the late 1920's, when a Gestalt psychologist focused on the issue of Gestalt teaching and learning, and what that could offer to students who were not learning…

Carton, J.S. (1996). The differential effects of tangible rewards and praise on intrinsic motivation: A comparison of cognitive evaluation theory and operant theory. The Behavior Analyst, 19, 237-255.

Cavalier, a.R., Ferretti, R.P., & Hodges, a.E. (1997). Self-management within a classroom token economy for students with learning disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 18, 167-178.

Davidson, P., & Bucher, B. (1978). Intrinsic interest and extrinsic reward: The effects of a continuing token program on continuing nonconstrained preference. Behavior Therapy, 9, 222-234.

Learning Organization Consolidate Research Definitions Organization Learning
Words: 1402 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2157851
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learning organization. *Consolidate research definitions organization learning. *Explain organization a learning organization (teaching federal government hospital). *Discuss advantages disadvantages organizational learning.

The learning organization

The modern day business climate is more challenging and dynamic and it forces the economic agents to seek alternative sources of strategic advantages. One example in this sense is represented by the enhancement of the emphasis placed on supporting learning and the continuous development of the organization of learning. While this concept is gaining more and more interest within the economic agents, it is also highly applicable within public entities, such as hospitals.

This project then starts at the premises that the concept of the learning organization is highly applicable in the context of the teaching federal government hospital. The purpose of this paper is that of supporting a higher understanding of the learning organization, in order to lead to a superior application within the real…

References:

Appelbaum, S.H., 2000, The competitive advantage of organizational learning, Journal of Workplace Learning, Vol. 12, No. 2

Dowshen, S., 2010, Questions and answers, Kids' Health,  http://kidshealth.org/parent/question/parenting/hospitals.html  last accessed on August 6, 2012

John, D., 2002, Organizational learning and effectiveness, Routledge

Karash, R., Why a learning organization?  http://world.std.com/~lo/WhyLO.html  last accessed on August 6, 2012

Learning Organizations Leadership and Learning
Words: 4434 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79874533
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2. True learning organizations allocate the time and resources that are required to develop a competitive advantage based on the lifelong learning and training opportunities that are provided to everyone in the organization.

3. A learning organization not only develops the opportunities for learning but it also provides a corporate culture that encourage all of its members to become self-actualized, thereby contributing to the advancement of the larger society in which the organization competes. .

4. The leadership of true learning organizations ensure that the corporate vision is communicated to all members and provides a framework in which their feedback is welcomed and acted upon, as well as ensuring that an environment exists in which there "are no bad questions" concerning the direction in which the enterprise is headed.

5. Learning organizations make it possible to consolidate work and learning as well as encouraging all members of the enterprise to…

References

Albert, M. 1998 "Shaping a Learning Organization through the Linkage of Action Research

Interventions." Organization Development Journal, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 29-31.

Avolio, B.J., & Bass, B.M. 2002 Developing potential across a full range of leadership:

Cases on transactional and transformational leadership. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence

Learning Style Knowledge of Learning
Words: 1471 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 98112955
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Naturally, visual learners do not enjoy reading books as auditory learners would, as written information is mostly processed in the mind's ears rather than by visualizing the text. Finally, a Kinesthetic or Tactile learner will predominantly learn information through touch and movement. In other words, kinesthetic learners would enjoy hands on laboratory session more than a routine class lecture. They also like to simulate events to understand them better. [Marcia L. Conner, pg 47]

Advantages of Knowing the Learning Style

Now that we have seen the domination of different modalities resulting in different learning styles among students, it is pertinent to understand the implications of such differences in context of their academic performance. Several studies have attested to that fact that only 20% of students learn through their auditory modality while 80% are either visual or kinesthetic. [Donna Walker, pg 16] However, in stark contrast, most of higher education is…

Bibliography

1) Marcia L. Conner, (2004) 'Learn More Now: 10 Simple steps to Learning Better, Smarter and Faster',

2) Richard M. Felder, (2005), 'Understanding Student Differences', Journal of Engineering education, 94(1) 57-72, available online at,  http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Papers/Understanding_Differences.pdf 

3) Donna Walker Tileston, (2005) 10 Best Teaching Practices: How Brain research, Learning Styles and Standards Define Teaching Competences', Published by Corwin Press.

4) Steve Garnett, (2005), 'Using Brainpower in the Classroom: Five steps to accelerate Learning', Published by Routledge

Learning Journals in Higher and
Words: 1173 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 94239104
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One result is that in spite of being told how to record a journal in the context of an independent format, most students used a format preferred by the teacher which demonstrates a possible "lack of proficiency with reflective writing" (2002, p. 343), meaning that almost all of the students were not at all familiar with reflective writing techniques and decided to adhere to a format more in line with what the teacher expected or preferred. Another result is that 55% of the submitted journals appear to have become more critical and self-reflective toward the end of the course, an indication that these students had actually become more proficient as reflective writers as a result of keeping a record of their thoughts and achievements.

As to strengths and weaknesses related to the article, it is clear that Langer is a master of academic extrapolation, due to his ability to write…

REFERENCES

Langer, a.M. (2002). Reflecting on practice: using learning journals in higher and continuing education. Teaching in Higher Education, 7(3), 337-352.

Petersen, M.N. (2005). Non-traditional students in higher education. Journal of the American

Educational Board, 4(2), 223-227.

Wilson, J.P. (2004). The application of learning journals in a science classroom environment.

Learning Styles the Theory of Honey and
Words: 2744 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2460708
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Learning Styles

The theory of Honey and Mumford, describes the styles and learning strategies. It incorporates much of the theory of Kolb's learning cycle, making it more intelligible.

It is important to discuss these strategies with students. (Marsick and atkins, p132-51) hile this allows the teacher to become aware of the need to vary their teaching because they do not exist in universal, it also allows learners to realize that everyone learns differently.

So its dominant learning strategies can influence its working methods and student personnel can then optimize them. It may also become more self-confidence. Honey and Mumford (1986) take away from Kolb (1984) the idea of an experiential learning model in four stages they call: experience, the return on experience, drawing conclusions and planning. (aring and Evans, p117-28)

According to them, each phase has specific behaviors and attitudes and is important to successfully complete the learning process itself.…

Works Cited

Lam, Y.L. Defining the effects of transformation leadership on organization learning: a cross-cultural comparison: School Leadership & Management, 2002, pp 439-52.

Marquardt, M. Action learning in action: Transforming problems and people for world- class organizational learning. Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black Publishing, 1999, pp45-49.

Marsick, V.J., and Watkins, KE. Demonstrating the value of an organization's learning culture: The Dimensions of Learning Organizations Questionnaire, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 2003 5, pp132-151.

Evans, C. And Graff, M. "Exploring style: enhancing the capacity to learn?," Education & Training, Vol. 50, 2008, pp. 93-102.

Learning Motivation and Long-Term Retention
Words: 2367 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42018912
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In conjunction with these perspectives on how to create a highly effective online learning platform that aligns to the specific needs of students, there is a corresponding area of research that concentrates on teaching resiliency in the teaching process. The work of Dr. Carol Dweck of Stanford University underscores the need for leading students to continually challenge themselves to grow and have a very strong growth mindset vs. A limited on. She draws on an empirically-derived research study that shows the greater the growth mindset of even the most talented and gifted mindset, the greater the long-term performance gains they make in life (Dweck, 2006). Her book, Mindset, challenges both students and teachers to create a culture of continual focus on excellence and continual striving to improve, never taking a closed or limited mindset to improvement. It is an inspirational book and shows that there is hope for continual improvement…

Works Cited

Ahlfeldt, S., Mehta, S., & Sellnow, T. (2005). Measurement and analysis of student engagement in university classes where varying levels of PBL methods of instruction are in use. Higher Education Research & Development, 24(1), 5-20.

Basile, a. & D'Aquila, J.M. (2002). An experimental analysis of computer-mediated instruction and student attitudes in a Principles of Financial Accounting course. Journal of Education for Business, 77(3), 137.

Beard, L.A. (2002). Students perceptions of online vs. campus instruction. Education, 122(4), 658.

Dutton, j. d.; Dutton, m.; Perry, j. (2002). How do Online Students Differ from Lecture Students? JALN. Vol. 6, no. 1, July.

Learning Clinical Interview Revision How
Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Interview Paper #: 59252012
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If teachers fail to design connected scaffolds than the class will develop only limited capabilities. He explains that this can be done by choosing only those scaffolding tools which have similar structures, assignment objectives, and interactive styles (Tabak, 2004). Hence when considering the scaffolds for developing skills of weak students, I will make sure that the scaffolds are complementing not only the main learning objective but also one another.

eferences

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information eview, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological esearch and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.

Jones, P.…

References

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information Review, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological Research and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.

Learning and Respiratory Care Problem-Based
Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 5012745
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In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that…

Many studies have shown that PBL students experience greater motivation toward learning than their traditional counterparts (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Beachey, 2007, Rogal & Snider, 2008). Further PBL has been associated with greater satisfaction in the learning process by physicians than its traditional counterpart (Beachey, 2007; Op't Holt, 2000; Rogal & Snider, 2008). Evaluations of PBL programs have found that not only do students take pleasure in the process, they also believe that they have the capacity to out perform their peers from traditional curricula in clinical settings (Op't Holt, 2005; Kaufman & Mann, 1996). Studies have shown that the teaching method has little bearing on the learning of academically talented students (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Distlehorst, Dawson, Robbs, & Barrows, 2005; Op't Hoyt, 2005). In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that one would expect significant improvement in clinical knowledge and performance in order to advocate for the use of PBL in the classroom due to the extensive resources that are required to utilize PBL curricula.

One would expect that PBL students would be at a significant advantage over their traditional peers due to the clinical application in the classroom (Colliver, 2000). Some

Learning and Development
Words: 3387 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4344802
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Business

Leadership Learning & Development

The reorganization of a business can take many forms. One of the most crucial areas for reorganization when expanding a business, buying a new business, or even restructuring because of bankruptcy, is to focus the new management team and to incorporate viable solutions for leadership learning & development protection. This report aims to draw up a management development program, devise a program that ensures that the learning needs of the organization are met in a sound and reliable strategic plan and illustrate how a well formatted strategic plan can tie in the objectives associated with learning and development planning.

In addition, the report must also justify the management development program including the strengths and weaknesses of this type of program. By explaining the importance of learning and development in the strategic direction of an organization, the management team is more likely to successfully evaluate what…

Works Cited

Ciulla, Joanne B. (1998). Ethics, the Heart of Leadership. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishing.

Daft, Richard L. (1997). Management (4th ed.). New York, NY: The Dryden Press.

Dew, John R. (1997). Empowerment and Democracy in the Workplace: Applying Adult Education Theory and Practice for Cultivating Empowerment. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Durgee, Jeffrey F., Gina Colarelli O'Connor, and Robert W. Veryzer. (1996) Translating Values Into Product Wants. Journal of Advertising Research. Vol. 36.

Learning Styles and College Students
Words: 4864 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64521808
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Community Colleges in America

In 1983 and 1984, a dozen major reports on the United States' schools were published. All stressed the need for "excellence" in education. These reports are the subject of: Excellence in Education: Perspectives on Policy and Practice. The reports pertaining to higher education were published by The BusinessHigher Education Forum, and saw higher education as "unable to train skilled managers and technicians that they believed industry needed." (Altbach 32) These reports essentially claim that student achievement has declined at technical schools because schools "do not demand enough of their students, do not apply stiff criteria for promotion, do not test students enough, and particularly in high school, provide students with too many choices about what subjects they study." (Altbach 32) These reports are somewhat dated in that they compare American students with Japanese students and focus on technical proficiency vs. The intuitive grasp of problems and…

Works Cited

Altbach, Philip G., Gail P. Kelly, and Lois Weis, eds. Excellence in Education: Perspectives on Policy and Practice. Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1985.

Baker, George A., Judy Dudziak, and Peggy Tyler, eds. A Handbook on the Community College in America: Its History, Mission, and Management. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994.

Diaz, David P., and Ryan B. Cartnal. "Students' Learning Styles in Two Classes Online Distance Learning and Equivalent On-Campus." College Teaching 47.4 (1999): 130-135.

Miller, Richard I., Charles Finley, and Candace Shedd Vancko. Evaluating, Improving, and Judging Faculty Performance in Two-Year Colleges. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey, 2000.

Learning Educational Psychology Multiple Choice
Words: 3789 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64594759
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A behavior resulting from injury or disease behavior resulting from experience behavior resulting from disease or drugs biologically determined behavior

Evidence that learning has occurred is seen in published research studies changes in thinking changes in behavior emotional stability

Change in performance is preceded by bad reviews scientific research the behavior of others change in disposition

If-then statements may also be referred to as principles generalization hypothesis laws

Statements which summarize relationships are restricted to the physical sciences known as hypothesis known as generalization never used in the social sciences

Rules which govern the gathering of information are known as rigid and dogmatic scientific method being flexible

APA rules for research studies

Informed consent is given by the researcher judicial review the American Psychological Association the research subject

Laws are to beliefs as truth is to untruth accuracy is to inaccuracy convictions are to facts are to convictions

Trace conditioning…

Learning About the Lotus Elise Car What
Words: 2507 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 19656114
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learning about the Lotus Elise car. What can one grasp from this particular case? Is there anything significant that stands out? One will discuss this scenario in depth along with theory and recommendations.

Creativity in Organization

Many factors are worth considering when looking at creativity in an organizational environment, especially for Lotus Elise, which include communication, decision making, handling potential conflicts, personal attitudes and group roles. People make decisions every day; they are usually good and bad. However, one needs to describe what these actually are in a business environment. These consist of" democratic, autocratic, collective-participative and consensus" (Leadership Management, 2011, p. 1).

Democratic refers to the majority vote when decisions are made, such as having the Board of Directors decide between three possible candidates who will want to become the next Chief Executive Officer (CEO). One can view an autocratic leader as one who controls everything that occurs within…

References

Ahmed, P.K., Shepherd, C.D., (2010). Innovative Management: Context, strategies, systems and processes. Prentice Hall Business.

Career-Success-For-Newbies. (2011). Work attitude values enhancement: Your personal principles. Retrieved June 14, 2011, from Career-Success-For-Newbies:  http://www.career-success-for-newbies.com/work-attitude-values-enhancement.html .

Forbes. (2011). Seven tips to solving conflict at work. Retrieved June 14, 2011, from Forbes:  http://www.forbes.com/2005/08/24/cx_sr_conflictslide_7.html?thisSpeed=6000?forwardName=cx_sr_conflictslide .

Leadership Management. (2011). Decision-making styles. Retrieved June 14, 2011, from Leadership management:  http://leadershipmanagement.com/html-files/decision.htm .

Techniques to Improve Motivation of Employees
Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12560213
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Introduction
Employee motivation is a factor emanating from commitment and creativity to allow workers to pursue work-related goals. One of the continuing challenges at workplaces, especially for managers and supervisors, is employee motivation. It mostly happens in work environments with no emphasis on employee satisfaction as part of a company’s strategy. Managers and supervisors should recognize their powers to draw forth the best that employees can offer. All employees should feel recognized, motivated, rewarded and supported for them to work efficiently. As a manager or supervisor, no work environment always supports individual efforts geared towards motivating employees to work hard. Even the most supportive work environment is capable of posing challenges when it comes to improving the motivation of employees. However, employers can still create appropriate environment for enhancing employee motivation.
Techniques to Improve Motivation of Employees
Communication
Employers need to communicate with employees effectively and responsibly. All employees want…

Techniques for Relaxation
Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79365046
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By wiping out all other thoughts from the conscious mind, the person is able to address only one thought -- and that thought is to remain the focus throughout the entire meditation (Kaur, Agarwal, & Babbar, 2014). The continual repetition of Om or another word, sound, or phrase, would be an example of exclusive meditation. Additionally, a person can visualize a specific image and hold that image in his or her head as a point of focus for exclusive meditation. Transcendental meditation is a popular method, along with another similar method called relaxation response (Smith, 2007). Studies done on transcendental meditation from Harvard researchers have shown that the technique is effective for people who want to reduce stress levels (Smith, 2007).

Mental imagery is the creation of an image in the mind (Smith, 2007). This can be an image that is put there as a suggestion from someone else, or…

References

Kaur, S., Agarwal, N., & Babbar, R. (2014). Effectiveness of relaxation techniques in reducing stress levels by measuring heart rate variability. International Journal of Physiology, 2(1), 26-30.

Payne, R.A., & Donaghy, M. (2010). Relaxation techniques: A practical handbook for the health care professional. NY: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Smith, J.C. (2007). Chapter 3: The Psychology of Relaxation. In Lehrer, P.M., Woolfolk, R.L., & Sime, W.E. Principles and practice of stress management (3rd ed.). NY: The Guilford Press.

Learning Healthcare Reform From the Lean Experts
Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7755963
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Evidence and Expert Interview

SMAT Goals - Evidence and Expert Interview

I chose goals in the areas of leadership development and organizational planning because I believe these are pivotal skills for a nurse to have in order to be an effective member of a healthcare team. My SMAT goals are as follows:

SMAT Goal 1: Leadership Development

To implement a process of increasing communication between field staff and case managers to increase patient meeting nursing goals to 80% by July 2014.

SMAT Goal 2: Organizational Planning

As a nurse administrator of a home health agency, it is my goal to incorporate a time management-mentoring project for all nurses to balance a healthy work-life balance by March 1, 2015.

Peer-eviewed Articles

SMAT Goal 1: Leadership Development

Staggers, N., Gassert, C.A., and Curran, C. (2002). esults of a Delphi study to determine informatics competencies for nurses at four levels of practice. Nursing…

References

Staggers, N., Gassert, C.A., and Curran, C. (2002). Results of a Delphi study to determine informatics competencies for nurses at four levels of practice. Nursing Research, Nov/Dec. Retrieved  http://nursing-informatics.com/niassess/NIcompetencies_Staggers.pdf 

Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12464758 

Spear, S.J. (2005). Fixing Health Care from the Inside, Harvard Business Review. Retrieved  http://hbr.org/2005/09/fixing-health-care-from-the-inside-today/ar/1 

The Lean Healthcare Exchange. Retrieved  http://www.leanhealthcareexchange.com/

Learning Pain Assessment and Management
Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 15955736
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43). The pain assessment guidelines set forth in this article will have an immediate effect on my first encounter with a patient, particularly if that patient is a chronic pain sufferer or end-of life patient. The sixth defined responsibility in the INPA is also of particular importance in regards to the information contained in this article; this is the responsibility to "evaluate with the patient/client the status of the goal achievement as a basis for reassessment" (INPA, 2007, p. 43). The evaluation of pain and the assessment of necessary and reasonable care in end-of-life patients is a complex task, as this article points out, so the implications of this article's information on this task of the registered nurse are huge.

Its affects on the practical nurse are similar, though heightened. Many of the basic responsibilities of the registered nurse and the practical nurse are the same; for instance, the language…

References

Indiana Code and Indiana Administrative Code. (2007). Indiana nurse practice act.

Sherman, D., Matzo, M., Pace, J. & R. Virani. (2004). "Learning pain assessment and management: A goal of the end-of-life nursing education consortium." The journal of continuing education in nursing, 35 (3), pp. 107-120.