American Revolution it Could Be Term Paper

  • Length: 8 pages
  • Sources: 5
  • Subject: Economics
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #77259109

Excerpt from Term Paper :

This strategy also permitted the more speedy management of local dealings. Basically the purpose of this strategy was to centralize of colonial affairs; however, it simply solidified the idea that the colonies needed a system of self-governance that was not inclusive of the British government. Because of the behavior of the British government, the English colonies that revolted in 1776 had in common: "representative assemblies and this institutional affinity laid the foundations for the concerted resistance without which the American Revolution would have been impossible."

It was under the auspices of the English government's attempt to control the colonists that the idea of American independence began to be viewed as necessary. The colonist felt that they had the right and the wisdom to rule and to develop a governmental structure that would be conducive with meeting the needs and the goals of those living within the colonies. The structure of this government borrowed some ideas from the English but it was new and different in many ways. The ideas concerning this new government began to surface prior the American Revolution and continued during and after the revolution.

With these things being understood the colonist were ready and felt capable of moving toward independence. Ultimately there were successful in their endeavors and gained independence from British Rule. In 1776 the declaration of independence was signed and it provided a foundation for the manner in which America would be governed. The declaration insisted that among other things all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. -- That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness."

The declaration provided the British government with the clear intentions of an independent America. It also served as a foundation for the development of the democracy that America has evolved into. This declaration is an outcome of America's quest for independence and a result of the American Revolution.

Conclusion

The purpose of this discussion was to examine the causes of the American Revolution. The examination focused on the economic, social and political issues that led to the American Revolution. The research found that the English government sought to control the economy of the colonies even when it became obvious that the colonists had the capacity to control their own economy. To guarantee economic control over the colonies the currency act and the stamp act were implemented. Both of these acts were met with opposition and became the catalysts for the American Revolution.

In addition to the economic issues between the colonies and the English government there were also social issues that arose. Chief among these issues was religious freedom. Many of the colonists left the old world in pursuit of religious freedom and they feared that the continuation of British rule would impede upon their religious freedom.

The research also found several political issues that led to the American revolutions. Overall, it appears that the colonies began to develop political philosophies that differed from that of the English government. The colonies wanted to be in control of their political and economic destiny. The colonies also recognized that they were totally capable of governing themselves.

References

Becker, Carl Lotus Schlesinger, Arthur M. The History of Political Parties in the Province of New York, 1760-1776. University of Wisconsin Press: Madison, WI. 1960.

Declaration of Independence. Online Available at http://www.archives.gov/national-archives-experience/charters/declaration_transcript.html

Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1943.

Priest, Claire. "Currency Policies and Legal Development in Colonial New England." Yale Law Journal 110, no. 8 (2001): 1303.

Volo, Dorothy Denneen, and James M.Volo. Daily Life during the American Revolution. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2003.

Wahlke, John C., ed. The Causes of the American Revolution. Boston D.C. Heath and Company, 1967.

Ibid,

Priest, Claire. "Currency Policies and Legal Development in Colonial New England." Yale Law Journal 110, no. 8 (2001): 1303.

Becker, Carl Lotus Schlesinger, Arthur M. The History of Political Parties in the Province of New York, 1760-1776. University of Wisconsin Press: Madison, WI. 1960.

Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution. Boston:…

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